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haunyack
2007-03-11, 17:32
Ok, I am a relative novice to this hobby and have learned a great deal from these forums.
Thanks to all who freely and generously share their knowledge and experience.

Now the question -
Is it true that electronics "break-in"?

Specifically - I have read that my new Vandersteen's "break-in" after about 100 hours.
Does this mean that these exquisite speakers will sound even better as I go?

.

pfarrell
2007-03-11, 17:35
haunyack wrote:
> Now the question -
> Is it true that electronics "break-in"?
>
> Specifically - I have read that my new Vandersteen's "break-in" after
> about 100 hours. Does this mean that these exquisite speakers will sound even better as
> I go?


It is true that many people claim that electronics break in.
Others say that mostly what happens is that you and your ears become
trained.

In any case, enjoy your new speakers and the great music.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

haunyack
2007-03-11, 18:03
Pat,

At the risk of sticking your neck out - what's your opinion?

I always enjoy your remarks.


.

pfarrell
2007-03-11, 18:26
haunyack wrote:
> At the risk of putting your neck out - what's your opinion?

I believe that if there is any break-in for solid state parts and
components, it happens in a few seconds.

Speakers have moving parts, so I can understand how they would need a
few hours, just a car engine needs to be broken in.

The idea that things like speaker wires, or interconnects, need break in
just seems like marketing hype to me.

The obvious part of break in that I can understand is that "buyer's
remorse" is important, so making you keep something for a week or two
lets you get over the buyers remorse.

Tubes, phonograph cartridges, etc. have more reason for an engineer to
understand a potential justification for some break-in.

All IMHO, of course.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

Skunk
2007-03-11, 20:02
Specifically - I have read that my new Vandersteen's "break-in" after about 100 hours.
Does this mean that these exquisite speakers will sound even better as I go?

.

You might ask Mr. Vandersteen, he seems awfully helpful: http://www.vandersteen.com/pages/Techpage1.html
(newest at the bottom)

I couldn't resist posing the question to him, but you might do so as well because mine was rather rhetorical and may not be posted. I didn't see it mentioned on the site...

He would probably appreciate hearing from you, based on your comments.

pablolie
2007-03-11, 20:50
I agree with the perception that moving parts get broken in. Loudspeakers. And our ears. When we are used to something in an area as complex as psychoacoustics, *we* need time to adjust as well.

haunyack
2007-03-11, 21:32
You might ask Mr. Vandersteen, he seems awfully helpful: http://www.vandersteen.com/pages/Techpage1.html
(newest at the bottom)

I couldn't resist posing the question to him, but you might do so as well because mine was rather rhetorical and may not be posted. I didn't see it mentioned on the site...

He would probably appreciate hearing from you, based on your comments.


Hey Skunk,

Thanks for your input.
I have posted to Vandersteen FAQ and have not recieved a response, although I have noticed that subsequent post's have been answered.

S'ok...
Plenty of folks around here that can answer my "entry level" questions to my satisfaction I am sure.

Cheers to the house.


.

haunyack
2007-03-11, 21:38
I agree with the perception that moving parts get broken in. Loudspeakers. And our ears. When we are used to something in an area as complex as psychoacoustics, *we* need time to adjust as well.

Pablolie,

Interesting handle.

Funny you should mention the perceptive side of aural interpretation.

I have found that with my former speakers - B&W Matrix 805, (very fine as well) - there have been times where the music was completely involving and my immersion in the sound field almost sublime.

Other days, the same tracks sound like so much noise emanating from a cheap Philco car radio.

.

haunyack
2007-03-11, 21:41
haunyack wrote:
> At the risk of putting your neck out - what's your opinion?

I believe that if there is any break-in for solid state parts and
components, it happens in a few seconds.

Speakers have moving parts, so I can understand how they would need a
few hours, just a car engine needs to be broken in.

The idea that things like speaker wires, or interconnects, need break in
just seems like marketing hype to me.


The obvious part of break in that I can understand is that "buyer's
remorse" is important, so making you keep something for a week or two
lets you get over the buyers remorse.

Tubes, phonograph cartridges, etc. have more reason for an engineer to
understand a potential justification for some break-in.

All IMHO, of course.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html
Pat,

As always, you have made it easy to understand sometimes complex criteria.

.

pablolie
2007-03-11, 22:06
Pablolie,

... B&W Matrix 805, (very fine as well) - there have been times where the music was completely involving and my immersion in the sound field almost sublime.

Other days, the same tracks sound like so much noise emanating from a cheap Philco car radio.

.

So what did you do? You ahev to finish telling the story.

B&W 805s are excellent speakers - what did you have them paired with? The rest of the chain in your sig has been a constant?

haunyack
2007-03-12, 06:42
So what did you do? You ahev to finish telling the story.

B&W 805s are excellent speakers - what did you have them paired with? The rest of the chain in your sig has been a constant?

I overstated the bit about a "cheap Philco car radio".
Philco made a fine car radio in it's time.

;-)


I will be moving the SB3 > BP20(1) > RB1070 > 805'S to the bedroom in favor of the Transporter(when it arrives) > BP20(2) > B&K > V3A Sig.

.

Skunk
2007-03-14, 19:54
I have posted to Vandersteen FAQ and have not recieved a response, although I have noticed that subsequent post's have been answered.


Just noticed he responded to mine (questioner's name = Puzzled), and another break in ? which I'm guessing was yours.

So you heard right... 100 hours for the majority of break in, and completely broken in before 400.

He had a good point about the acclimation period, but for the record- Fostex doesn't recommend 5k hours of break in. 'They' was a reference to forum people, who would have you believe fostexes turn golden after some extraordinary amount of hours break in. They sound the same to me as the day I got them, and they do actually have ~5k hours. Then again how would I know if they didn't, unless I had an unused pair in the same enclosure to compare...

mlsstl
2007-03-14, 20:18
I'm in the category that doesn't buy into electronic break-in, especially those situations that claim hundreds of hours may be required. In the area of electronics, we have satellites, medical equipment, test equipment and all manner of other stuff that seems to work just fine from the git-go. Only in audio do we seem to have these mystical happenings.

As another poster noted, some days my system sounds better than other days. I strongly suspect I'm much more the variable than the equipment. <g>

haunyack
2007-03-15, 10:03
Just noticed he responded to mine (questioner's name = Puzzled), and another break in ? which I'm guessing was yours.

So you heard right... 100 hours for the majority of break in, and completely broken in before 400.

He had a good point about the acclimation period, but for the record- Fostex doesn't recommend 5k hours of break in. 'They' was a reference to forum people, who would have you believe fostexes turn golden after some extraordinary amount of hours break in. They sound the same to me as the day I got them, and they do actually have ~5k hours. Then again how would I know if they didn't, unless I had an unused pair in the same enclosure to compare...

Hey Skunk,

I checked the FAQ and did see your Q.
No matter, as long as the info was posted.

As to the point of acclimation - and conversely your point "Then again how would I know if they didn't, unless I had an unused pair in the same enclosure to compare" - it makes perfect sense as applied to the way we respond to sound at any given moment.

Remember how sweet our new found love sounded to our ears only to make us wretch at the bitter end of the affair?
Wonder if the same applies to audio?

.