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ebin
2007-02-11, 18:35
Hey All

Just FYI
I live in Canada and have been running my #2 SB3
in my unheated garage all winter so far
Does not freeze in there but gets very cold.
(minus 20'C outside the garage)
The unit is usually turned on once a day
and somedays will run an hour or two.
Was told the display would be good for -20'C
Everything still works wonderful (knock on wood)

My #1 SB3 stays nice and warm snuggled up next to
my old Denon receiver and a pair of Paradigm 11se

Look'in to make/buy some wireless speakers for
around the pool area with #2, any suggestions??

Stay Warm
"Frost bit'in Canadian"

aubuti
2007-02-11, 19:25
There may be some exceptions that prove the rule, but for the most part wireless speakers have problems with static, dropouts, and generally not very good sound. As an alternative, could you move the SB out to poolside, and use them with some active (aka powered, amplified) speakers? Active speakers are available for a wide range of budgets, and many of them are very good. And an advantage of having the SB poolside is that you'll be able to control your tunes where you're listening to them.

mswlogo
2007-02-11, 20:50
You have pools in Canada !!!

Mark Lanctot
2007-02-11, 21:18
Hi ebin!

ebin lives in my city and I sold him that SB3. I just didn't realize he'd freeze the poor little thing! (just kidding!)

Actually this was his plan all along - I checked the specs for the display: operating temp to -20 C, storage temp to -40 C. We did have a few -20 nights a week or so ago. And as you see, it's coping fine. I haven't seen any other forum users operate their SBs in an unheated garage in the winter in a climate colder than this - it may be that ebin in doing environmental testing for Slim/Logitech.

Anyway in regards to your question, yes the cordless speakers almost universally suck. Plus I'm not sure if there's the combination weatherproof/wireless speaker. But almost every speaker manufacturer has outdoor speakers which would be fine for use in the summer. Home Depot sells 12 gauge outdoor lighting wire which would be ideal for speaker wiring - the wire insulation is UV resistant and it's designed to be buried. (Although if it's buried, I don't know why it needs to resist UV, but anyway. Maybe the exposed ends?) Its gauge is sufficient for long runs and at least one other forum member is using it for speaker wire, see http://forums.slimdevices.com/showpost.php?p=179574&postcount=33 I use this stuff on the model railroad, it's got a huge number of very fine strands and very, very thick insulation. Despite the thickness of the insulation, it remains relatively flexible because of the fine stranding.

You can even get outdoor speakers disguised as rocks at the local dealer: http://www.londonaudio.com/ , see "Rockustics", but they are expensive. Better to look at conventional outdoor speakers from your favourite speaker manufacturer.

Oh and yes mswlogo, we do have pools in Canada but we tend not to use the outdoor ones in February...

snarlydwarf
2007-02-11, 21:24
You have pools in Canada !!!

Yes, when the igloos melt,, they have pools.

seanadams
2007-02-11, 21:45
At this very moment Logitech's testing facility is subjecting SB3s to storage at -40 to +70 C temperatures, vibrating the heck out of them, dropping them, etc. I even saw them grind one up and put it in a x-ray spectrometer to look for lead, mercury, chromium etc. Fun stuff!

mflint
2007-02-12, 12:46
I even saw them grind one up and put it in a x-ray spectrometer to look for lead, mercury, chromium etc. Fun stuff!
You won't be laughing when the pile of dust lands on your desk for repair.

4mula1
2007-02-12, 13:08
At this very moment Logitech's testing facility is subjecting SB3s to storage at -40 to +70 C temperatures, vibrating the heck out of them, dropping them, etc. I even saw them grind one up and put it in a x-ray spectrometer to look for lead, mercury, chromium etc. Fun stuff!

So is my SB3 RoHS compliant? ;)

audio53
2007-02-12, 13:34
So is my SB3 RoHS compliant? ;)

Let's hope not, at least as far as soldering goes. I want something with the reliability of good old tin-lead. Not that unproven and environmentally harmful tin-silver-copper solder. But, considering they ship SB3's to the EU, I'm sure it is RoHS compliant.

At least the SB3 is made in the US. I was pleasantly surprised to see made in California on my SB3.

Bob

verbatone
2007-02-12, 14:15
Don't fool yourself, final assembly may be done (or was done) in the US, but I'll bet more than 95% percent of the materials (plastics, LCD, circuit board, electrical components) were manufactured outside the US, most likely in China. The SMT process probably happened in China too.

I believe RoHS solder joints are just as strong as tin-lead, it's just the melting point is higher for RoHS solder paste. Once it flows, it's good to go!

ebin
2007-02-12, 17:35
Hey

Yes the pool is frozen right now,
but gets a lotta use in the summer months and
we have a heater to extend the season some what.
Great for bathing the Huskies LOL

I was looking to modify some omni-directional
speakers to go around the property for
when we have outdoor parties, that way they can
be placed where ever the "action" is and not
disturb the neighbours.Might just stick to
wired ones under the eaves
(they will look a lot better once painted)
One set in the garage on ceiling and work very well
so I thought I would try another out side.
Haven't picked speakers(6.5") for 2nd set yet,
Any suggestions?

seanadams
2007-02-12, 17:59
Don't fool yourself, final assembly may be done (or was done) in the US, but I'll bet more than 95% percent of the materials (plastics, LCD, circuit board, electrical components) were manufactured outside the US, most likely in China. The SMT process probably happened in China too.

I believe RoHS solder joints are just as strong as tin-lead, it's just the melting point is higher for RoHS solder paste. Once it flows, it's good to go!

Correct. Over the years, production has moved incrementally to China wherever appropriate. Today, Squeezebox mechanical assembly, test, and pack happens in California, but that too will go to China soon. It is practically impossible to manufacture electronics at any appreciable volume in the US.

Transporter's electronics are also built in China, but the aluminum chassis is machined locally, and final assembly takes place here. There are no immediate plans to change the Transporter process.

The initial switch to RoHS was a pain, but there have been no reliability issues.

audio53
2007-02-12, 19:08
I believe RoHS solder joints are just as strong as tin-lead, it's just the melting point is higher for RoHS solder paste. Once it flows, it's good to go!

Not true. I am an electronics manufacturing engineer. Data coming in shows SAC (no-lead) alloys to be worse than SnPb under shock and vibration. (Don't drop your SB3.) About the same as SnPb under thermal cycling. The real issue is the false belief that the lead free alloys are better for the environment. Also not true when looked at from a scientific and not a political/marketing point of view. Here is some reading for you: www.rohsusa.com Even the US EPA agrees that lead based solders have no adverse impact on the environment. This is what happens when politicians get involved in technical matters. We now mine more tin (which produces lead as a by product), we use more energy to solder at 40 degree C higher temperatures, we throw away 50+ years of soldering knowledge and reliability for an unknown alloy and actually put worse things in the landfill. Go figure.

Recycling is the answer.

Bob

audio53
2007-02-12, 19:14
Correct. Over the years, production has moved incrementally to China wherever appropriate. Today, Squeezebox mechanical assembly, test, and pack happens in California, but that too will go to China soon. It is practically impossible to manufacture electronics at any appreciable volume in the US.

Transporter's electronics are also built in China, but the aluminum chassis is machined locally, and final assembly takes place here. There are no immediate plans to change the Transporter process.

The initial switch to RoHS was a pain, but there have been no reliability issues.

Agreed about producing consumer products in the US. Wishful thinking on my part :-) Glad I am in the military/avionics end of electronics manufacturing. More interesting anyway.

The SB3 is too young to judge potential lead-free solder reliability. See my previous post. Curious as to what reliability testing standard(s) you used when you switched to lead-free. From a practical viewpoint, you may not experience reliability issues depending on how long a typical SB3 life cycle will be. Consumer electronic products today typically have a short life due to technology advances and the uncontrollable need to upgrade to the latest and greatest.

Bob