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randybrand
2007-02-07, 13:13
Since moving my router I have been having trouble with various symptoms of dropouts and stuttering. The router is now on the opposite side of the microwave from the SB3. I think I got the stuttering cured by moving the router a little further away from the wires and DVR for my security system.
I am still having trouble with dropouts (SB3 goes dark, lights back up and generally resumes after several seconds or more). This seems to be mostly associated with microwave oven activity, but not always. It generally seems solid until the rest of the family gets home. Server and network health is OK. I am running 6.3.1 to get rid of the problem associated with end of song cut-off. Does anyone know whether channel changes might help this, or should I move the router closer to the SB3?

snarlydwarf
2007-02-07, 13:22
Channel changes may work: microwave ovens have a sort of transmission curve like a router does. Where precisely that curve is in the 2.4Ghz space depends on brand/model/daily-manufacturing-variance. So, yeah, moving your channel may move it out of the way (or more into the way...). If the curve from the oven is sufficiently flat, though, it may be messing up all the channels.

pfarrell
2007-02-07, 13:32
snarlydwarf wrote:
> Channel changes may work: microwave ovens have a sort of transmission
> curve like a router does. Where precisely that curve is in the 2.4Ghz
> space depends on brand/model/daily-manufacturing-variance. So, yeah,
> moving your channel may move it out of the way (or more into the
> way...). If the curve from the oven is sufficiently flat, though, it
> may be messing up all the channels.

Or the OP could buy a new Microwave.

The use of 2.4gHz for WiFi, WiMax, etc. is most problematic. Microwave
ovens were there first, and there for a reason. RF at about 2.4gHz
resonates with the Hydrogen/Oxygen bond in water, which is why microwave
ovens work, they move the water molecules, generating heat.

It was unused when the initial engineering was done in the 1950s because
all the rest of the RF engineers (AM, FM, TV, shortwave, etc.) wanted to
have signals that were not blocked by trees, clouds, house plants, etc.
And so RF communications folks avoided it. The interference is exactly
what the microwave oven inventors wanted, and the band was available.

Of course, everything uses 2.4gHz, from wireless phones, wifi, zigbee,
bluetooth, etc. So there is lots of competition for the frequencies.

I really wish the WiFi "N" folks would move new stuff into another band,
but it is unlikely.

Booster antennas, hacked router firmware that uses more power, etc are
other alternatives.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

jonheal
2007-02-07, 13:39
Since moving my router I have been having trouble with various symptoms of dropouts and stuttering. The router is now on the opposite side of the microwave from the SB3. I think I got the stuttering cured by moving the router a little further away from the wires and DVR for my security system.
I am still having trouble with dropouts (SB3 goes dark, lights back up and generally resumes after several seconds or more). This seems to be mostly associated with microwave oven activity, but not always. It generally seems solid until the rest of the family gets home. Server and network health is OK. I am running 6.3.1 to get rid of the problem associated with end of song cut-off. Does anyone know whether channel changes might help this, or should I move the router closer to the SB3?

To heck with server and network health. I'd be more concerned about the health of my gonads!!

Ur[s]uS
2007-02-07, 13:42
Since moving my router I have been having trouble with various symptoms of dropouts and stuttering. The router is now on the opposite side of the microwave from the SB3. I think I got the stuttering cured by moving the router a little further away from the wires and DVR for my security system.
I am still having trouble with dropouts (SB3 goes dark, lights back up and generally resumes after several seconds or more). This seems to be mostly associated with microwave oven activity, but not always. It generally seems solid until the rest of the family gets home. Server and network health is OK. I am running 6.3.1 to get rid of the problem associated with end of song cut-off. Does anyone know whether channel changes might help this, or should I move the router closer to the SB3?

this is one of the reasons i switched to a homeplug network over electricity powerlines - www.solwise.co.uk

ceejay
2007-02-08, 02:24
Does anyone know whether channel changes might help this, or should I move the router closer to the SB3?

There is a very good chance that changing channel would work. Why don't you just try it?

Ceejay

randybrand
2007-02-08, 12:42
So far I have tried a couple of channel change configurations, but no change. Microwave still kills connectivity. Also concerned about gonads. Looking for a device to measure leakage from the microwave. I am not expecting that to be a problem as it is only 1 year old, but ya never know! Last resort will be to move the router so that it is on the other side of the microwave.

Mark Lanctot
2007-02-08, 12:52
Looking for a device to measure leakage from the microwave.

There are expensive testers, but I have heard a fluorescent bulb works well. But at this point it'd be safe to say you have leakage.

No fear regarding various, umm, body parts. Microwaves are non-ionizing (i.e. they won't damage DNA like ionizing radiation will). It's only called "radiation" because it radiates out from the source, just like radio waves or light - in fact, it is radio waves. Microwaves will do to you what they do to food, i.e. cause thermal burns, but only if they are highly concentrated. There's no way leakage from a microwave oven would burn you or cause long-term damage - you'd have to stick a body part entirely in the microwave while it's in operation to get burnt - and, of course, the mandatory door interlock will prevent you (also I believe having the door open would cause the field to partially dissipate.) Otherwise it's just not concentrated enough.

Becker-Brown
2007-02-09, 21:47
Yep - I've been battling the same thing. I also used to experience some cordless phone interference, but switched to 5.8GHz - now it's just the mocrowave.

Anyhow - I've picked up the Netgear XE104g pack (one XE103, and one XE104) and installed them today, so I'll have to see what happens.

I'll reply with an update later down the road.

'Don't stop the music!'

-Stephen

ptumelty
2007-02-10, 17:11
Have you considered ditching the microwave and using a steamer? :)

Seriously, the powerline products are a great alternative. I used to get a really poor wireless LAN reception anywhere in the house and the ethernet over powerlines fixes this. I get an 85 Mbps connection which is more than fast enough for music, and no dropouts! The price is coming down all the time too. I pad 129 for two, and I think you can get them for around 40 each now. Just make sure you get HomePlug 1.0 compatible and then you won't be tied into a single manufacturer.

Paul.

Becker-Brown
2007-02-14, 18:48
OK - I've been using the Netgear wall-plugs I mentioned previously in the thread for about 5 days (nearly continous use of the SB2) with nary a drop, glitch, stutter. I'd have to give this method of connection a big green light.
Anyone else experiencing wireless connectivity issues should seriously consider going this route.

BTW - the XE104 has 4 ports which is nice if you're using any other networkable items (I got a Ceiva digital picture frame for Christmas :-)).

cheers all,
Stephen

Fleury
2007-02-16, 08:46
Same basic problem, after a few days of OK connection, my SB3 started to drop out, frequent reconnects, black screen etc. Power cycling the cable gateway would solve the problem for a brief time, then more lost connections. The network test would show 90-100% connection, even at the highest throughput, at the tip top it might drop to 85% or so. The buffer settings were all maxed out, netstumbler showed nobody on my channel nearby (isolated house). In theory, all should have been copacetic, so maybe it was the IP or an intermittent squeezenetwork problems? I put softsqueeze on my office PC, a different IP running from a university mainframe with bandwidth to spare. The connection was rock solid, only stuttering or dropping the signal once or twice when the mainframe was having a bad hair day. To make matters worse, I couldn't stream flacs at all on my SB3 at home. My first flac files buffered for a half a minute, then stuttered horribly until I put them out of their misery. But the same files played OK in a flac player on the PC.

My home network linksys WCG200 and Linksys range extender were just not up to the challenge, even with dual high gain antennas on the gateway. Sending the signal to the front of my very long house turned out to be a perilous journey. Every time the heat or AC kicked in, or the microwave started up, or the cat farted, the signal would vanish. SB3 refused to rebuffer half the time. I've seen the same symptoms described in a dozen different threads. It got so bad I could not even listen to a single song on the radio without the agony of rebuffering. What to do?

After much research, I decided to give the homeplug option a try, and picked up a Netgear XE104 base unit for the router, and an XE103 for the SB3. Don't buy the older versions that only do 10-14 mbs on a good day. The pricier 85 mbs models are the way to go, though 85 mbs is science fiction - but I'm getting 50-60 mbs over about 100 foot distance, which is more than adequate. Anything to do with networking is generally as bad a setup/install experience as you are likely to have. But these little adapters were literally plug and play, and how often have you had that experience with a PC product? I didn't have to install interface software (though it later proved useful to monitor the signal). Just stuck them in the wall, popped in the ethernet patch cords, reset the SB3 from wireless to wired, and that was that. Over the past week I have had only two blackouts, both due to the wireless connection from slimserver on my PC to my now hybrid wireless/homeplug LAN. No more dropouts, no more endless rebuffering. Just an uninterrupted flow of beautiful music. And my flac files load almost instantly and stream flawlessly (and sound FANTASTIC).

There are some problems with homeplug technology. Old or bad wiring could limit your success. My home is newly wired, with a single breaker panel, so not an issue for me. The biggest drawback is losing my protection from power surges. Homeplug adapters have to be plugged directly into the wall, power strips with surge protection just won't work. My speed went from 65 to 10 MBS when plugged it into a top end Monster Cable strip, and SB3 could no longer find the server. Almost every surge protector on the market now includes line filtering, which is great for quiet stereo listening or high end LCD TV's, but it treats the homeplug signal as noise and trashes it. Belkin makes a power strip with one plug designed for homeplug equipment, but that seems to be it for the market, and I really don't want to shell out major bucks for a 9 outlet strip with only one homeplug compatible outlet. The cheapest strips have no filtering, but are nearly useless in terms of surge protection capacity. If anyone knows of a surge protector (for a standard plug or for just ethernet cable) that is homeplug compatible please let me know. Meanwhile, I can let the music play all day, just in time for Mardi Gras. Laissez les bons temps roulez!