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Squirrel
2006-12-06, 05:38
All the UK suppliers of Squeezebox are showing "out of stock", "pre-order" etc etc...

Is this just a pre-xmas rush or something more sinister? I remember a "temporary hitch" with the Audiotron, "more expected soon". Next thing the product has been discontinued...

fuzzyT
2006-12-06, 09:03
Squirrel wrote:
> All the UK suppliers of Squeezebox are showing "out of stock",
> "pre-order" etc etc...
>
> Is this just a pre-xmas rush or something more sinister?

Sinister? The last time this happened with SD, it was because there was
a new hardware revision in the pipeline.

Given the timing though, I would just guess that it's seasonal demand.

--rt

jonheal
2006-12-06, 09:32
Why would Slim (Logitech) advertise a new, cosmetically changed SB3 if they were about to discontinue the line?

snarlydwarf
2006-12-06, 09:39
Sinister? The last time this happened with SD, it was because there was a new hardware revision in the pipeline.

I thought it was more due to changes in law about acceptable materials in consumer electronics devices. (I can't remember the law name, but I'm not in the UK, so I don't have to worry about it.) For a while there was stock of the evil inedible squeezeboxes and a shortage of the safe-to-eat ones.



Given the timing though, I would just guess that it's seasonal demand.


There was a similar shortage last year at this time, though the publicity from things like the NYTimes review and such that came out around this time certainly fueled that too. Maybe this year is all the people who saw the reviews last year and finally broke down and bought a Squeezebox or three.

(And I thought I was slow: I only sat on the fence for a couple months.... a year is pushing it.)

kdf
2006-12-06, 09:55
Quoting snarlydwarf
<snarlydwarf.2iekon1165423201 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>:

>
> ron thigpen;160136 Wrote:
>>
>> Sinister? The last time this happened with SD, it was because there
>> was a new hardware revision in the pipeline.
>
> I thought it was more due to changes in law about acceptable materials
> in consumer electronics devices. (I can't remember the law name, but
> I'm not in the UK, so I don't have to worry about it.)

I believe you are thinking of:
RoHS, Restriction of Harmful Substances

And if you make products that ship around the world, you will have to
worry about it and all the new variations cropping up all over
-kdf

snarlydwarf
2006-12-06, 11:57
I believe you are thinking of:
RoHS, Restriction of Harmful Substances

And if you make products that ship around the world, you will have to
worry about it and all the new variations cropping up all over


Yeah, that is it. That is what the last shortage in the UK was, not a new product, really, just some modified plastics and differing solders and such.

I am sure it is a royal pain in the butt for people in manufacturing: why I am glad I work in a services industry. Product? What product? :) Is that like "import duties" and such I keep hearing about?

It is probably especially annoying when you have to keep differing stocks for differing markets, making inventory management far more complex.

kdf
2006-12-06, 12:08
Quoting snarlydwarf
<snarlydwarf.2ier5z1165431601 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>:

> It is probably especially annoying when you have to keep differing
> stocks for differing markets, making inventory management far more
> complex.

Thankfully, good planning means you don't have to. Many manufacturers
have already converted their own parts, so you can easily convert your
own products. Plus, the concept of RoHS is that it gets rid of bad
things that are better left out of the environment, air, landfills.
Granted, it does make it harder for the electronics hobbyist.
Reworking lead-free solder takes a bit more effort.
-k

peter
2006-12-06, 12:54
On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 11:08:58 -0800, "kdf" <slim-mail (AT) deane-freeman (DOT) com>
said:
> Quoting snarlydwarf
> <snarlydwarf.2ier5z1165431601 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>:
>
> > It is probably especially annoying when you have to keep differing
> > stocks for differing markets, making inventory management far more
> > complex.
>
> Thankfully, good planning means you don't have to. Many manufacturers
> have already converted their own parts, so you can easily convert your
> own products. Plus, the concept of RoHS is that it gets rid of bad
> things that are better left out of the environment, air, landfills.
> Granted, it does make it harder for the electronics hobbyist.
> Reworking lead-free solder takes a bit more effort.

Yes, wonderful. But what does it mean for the longevity of the devices?
Under US pressure Mercedes Benz converted their wiring harnesses to
biodegradable materials in the early nineties. The engine wiring
harnesses started failing due to time and heat about ten years later and
all had to be replaced (to considerable cost for the owners, MB wouldn't
pay). I hope my SB's won't start biodegrading after a few years. If so,
the net effect to the environment may well be negative. Good intentions
are not enough.

http://users.adelphia.net/~infoage1/complaints_nhtsa_mercedes_wiring_harness_failures_ 1991_1996.html

Regards,
Peter

kdf
2006-12-06, 13:12
tin isn't biodegradeable.

The majority of electronics parts are RoHS compliant simply by
changing the material they coat the packaging with. Cases of tin/lead
are simply tin. gold is ok. Mercury isn't a longevity granting
compound either. RoHS only covers products where the materials in
question are not specifically required for their function. Mercury
switches can be made exempt, small capacitors that require lead as the
dielectric are exempt. Metal leads on resistors don't require
tin/lead coating, so the lead must be moved. The materials covered by
RoHS are restricted, not eradicated. Several US states, a couple of
canadian provinces are also working on similar legislation, not
guaraneteed to be exactly the same. China just recently came out with
it's own variant, which is broader in scope and has more focus on
labelling.

Your SB will not become biofuel any time soon. The whole idea is not
to have the worst offending materials end up in landfills, and one
doesn't have to look far to start finding the early signs of broader
measures to control the increasingly disposable nature of products.

-kdf

cliveb
2006-12-06, 13:29
Granted, it does make it harder for the electronics hobbyist. Reworking lead-free solder takes a bit more effort.
Amen to that. Lead-free solder is a bitch to work with. It needs much higher temperatures, with consequently increased danger of frying the components you're trying to solder. I bought a socking great spool of leaded solder last year, before it became unobtainium. Hopefully it'll last me until I die (probably from lead poisoning :-)