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ob_kook
2006-12-05, 20:04
I originally replied to a thread in Audiophiles below, but decided to move it to General and give it it's own thread since it was a bit off topic from the OP.


I have to throw in an answer here since I just went through a whole lot of grief trying to get my SB to quit dropping! I have a Transporter in the livingroom, no more than 3 feet away from my wireless AP, and it's rock solid. The SB upstairs in the master bedroom is another story, and even though I've got an average 70% signal to it, it can NOT handle uncompressed files. Especially when synchronized, I have to LIMIT the SB to 320k. If I set it to NO LIMIT, it'll spit and sputter all night.

Now, my wireless network is running 811b compatible since I've got several 'older' Mac powerbooks. I've considered running wire to the SB just to help it, but I'm going to try an OMNI external antenna first to see if that fills in the gaps between upstairs and downstairs.

I am not certain I understood you correctly, but I had a similar issue that I have been troubleshooting.

My Wireless router (Linksys WRT54G) is upstairs, and I have a wireless access point (Linksys WAP54G) downstairs in order to get full house coverage. SlimServer is attached via ehternet to the WRT54G. The Squeezebox is much closer to the downstairs AP and is running wirelessly. Both router and AP broadcast the same SSID and have same encryption.

I was getting stutters and dropouts when playing FLAC even though I had great connectivity (90%+). If found that when I disabled the downstairs AP, I actually had much fewer dropouts and stutters even though I only had 50-60% signal.

This led me to believe that perhaps the issue was in the wireless transfer between the WRT54G and the WAP54G, so I ran a cable to connect them (previously they were also wirelessly connected).

To test it, I disabled the wireless broadcasting upstairs and only used the AP for the SB. Perfect. No dropouts, full buffer, much better performance.

The intersting thing is when I turned the wireless broadcast back on upstairs, the problems again manifested themselves in the same form (stutters, dropouts).

I am wondering if the SB is getting "confused" and trying to log into both the WRT and the WAP. Any ideas?

WinXP - SS 6.5.1 - SB2 - WRT54G router - WAP54G Access Point

Ramage
2006-12-06, 01:28
It could be mutual interference, between the 2 wireless access points. Are they on the same channel?

Set the channels as far apart as possible. There are a number of posts on here showing channel plans.

ceejay
2006-12-06, 01:36
This led me to believe that perhaps the issue was in the wireless transfer between the WRT54G and the WAP54G, so I ran a cable to connect them (previously they were also wirelessly connected).

To test it, I disabled the wireless broadcasting upstairs and only used the AP for the SB. Perfect. No dropouts, full buffer, much better performance.

The intersting thing is when I turned the wireless broadcast back on upstairs, the problems again manifested themselves in the same form (stutters, dropouts).

I am wondering if the SB is getting "confused" and trying to log into both the WRT and the WAP. Any ideas?



I for one am really confused about what you are trying to do with the Wireless Access Point. Normally this would be used WIRED back to your router and then broadcasting wireless from its location.

It may also have a wireless repeater mode where you can use it to connect back to your wireless router and present a Wired network in its location.

But it sounds like you are trying to use it to connect wirelessly to your router, and then wirelessly to your SB??? That doesn't sound right.

Apologies if I've misunderstood.

My set up is Wirelsss router at one end of the house, with a long cable running through the roof to a WAP at the other end of the house. Set to different channels! This gives me whole house coverage. In my case I have different SSIDs as I want to be able to force which wireless point the various devices are connecting to...


HTH
Ceejay

ob_kook
2006-12-06, 02:50
I for one am really confused about what you are trying to do with the Wireless Access Point. Normally this would be used WIRED back to your router and then broadcasting wireless from its location.

It may also have a wireless repeater mode where you can use it to connect back to your wireless router and present a Wired network in its location.

But it sounds like you are trying to use it to connect wirelessly to your router, and then wirelessly to your SB??? That doesn't sound right.

Apologies if I've misunderstood.

My set up is Wirelsss router at one end of the house, with a long cable running through the roof to a WAP at the other end of the house. Set to different channels! This gives me whole house coverage. In my case I have different SSIDs as I want to be able to force which wireless point the various devices are connecting to...


HTH
Ceejay


Ceejay, I originally was using it in repeater mode - just trying to get better coverage in the front of the house - with no cabling between the two.

Now I have wired it to the router in much the same fashion as you mention above. I want to keep the same SSID for both, but I think currently they set to the same channel. Perhaps that is my problem.

bergek
2006-12-06, 03:04
It could be mutual interference, between the 2 wireless access points. Are they on the same channel?

Set the channels as far apart as possible. There are a number of posts on here showing channel plans.

Sometimes using different channels can actually cause trouble.

Certain wireless clients (some Centrino based laptops have had this issue) first scan the different channels. When they find a channel where there is at least one AP with the correct SSID they associate with the AP that has the strongest signal strength. The remaining channels are NOT scanned. This is against the standard.

That means that if the AP with the weakest signal (upstairs) comes first in the search order for your wireless client and they are on different channels, it may not pick up the better one (downstairs).

If the two APs are sufficiently far away they might not cause too much interference anyway so you could try to set them to the same channel.

Regardless how you do it you should use channels 1, 6 & 11. Have you done a site survey?

ob_kook
2006-12-06, 03:20
Yes, I did conduct a site suvey with NetStumbler and chose channels which were not in use. There are quite a few wireless networks in my neighborhood that are in range of my house, although not very strong.

I think that from where the SB sits, it has relatively strong reception to either access point. (The downstairs access point is really there in order to extend to the basement theater).

There is no issue when I turn off the wireless broadcasting upstairs, but then I would not be able to browse email on Sunday morning from bed!

Why should one use channels 1,6 or 11?

bergek
2006-12-06, 04:00
Why should one use channels 1,6 or 11?

Frequency ranges for various 802.11b channels [GHz]:

1 2.401 - 2.423
2 2.404 - 2.428
3 2.411 - 2.433
4 2.416 - 2.438
5 2.421 - 2.443
6 2.426 - 2.448
7 2.431 - 2.453
8 2.436 - 2.458
9 2.441 - 2.463
10 2.446 - 2.468
11 2.451 - 2.473

This is for US/Canada. A few more channel may be available depending on the country.

Note how 1, 6, & 11 don't overlap in frequency. The same is true for 2, 7, 12 and 3, 8, 13 but channels 12 and 13 may not be available. In addition, most Wi-Fi access points are pre-configured with channel 1, 6 or 11 which means that other users in your neighbourhood probably use one or more of them. In that case it is easier to get a free channel if you stick to 1/6/11.

Mark Lanctot
2006-12-07, 13:20
I would think using the same SSID on both the router and the WAP would muddy things up quite a bit.

You'd never know what you were connecting to and there'd be no way to control which one you connect to.

bergek
2006-12-07, 15:35
I would think using the same SSID on both the router and the WAP would muddy things up quite a bit.

It depends on what you want to accomplish. Windows XP will connect to the first network in the preferred order as defined in your wireless network settings for which it has coverage. If you have separate SSID there will be separate entries in the settings and the top entry might not be the one you want to use. Not too much of a problem for a stationary computer where you could move the closest SSID to the top but for a laptop there is likely to be a lot of fiddling with the network settings.

Clients on other operating systems might work differently and hold on to the network for as long as it can even if there is stronger signal from another network. I don't think there is a standard in this area so it has the potential of being really muddy.