PDA

View Full Version : PDA with 11g WiFi?



aubuti
2006-12-01, 08:03
I need to replace my ancient PDA (Rex 6000, a great little product) and want one with WiFi. Besides using it for checking email at hotspots and such, I like the idea of using it as a remote for my 3 SBs. I was surprised to see that all the PDAs I looked at (including Palm TX and Dell Axims) only had 11b. Are there any out there with 11g?

I'd really rather not have to put my home network -- which is currently all 11g -- into mixed b/g mode. If I do, does the network take a performance hit even when there are no 11b devices around (ie, the PDA WiFi is switched off)? Thanks, and sorry about the slightly OT post.

Paul Webster
2006-12-01, 08:33
As a starting point - the Nokia 770 has 11g.
Its large screen with good resolution and the custom skin has driven a few people here to get it.
Not really a PDA though - but if you stuff lots of extra memory in it and add some extra (frre) software then it starts to look a lot more like one (in that it comes without many office productivity tools).
The 870 is thought to be around the corner - but was not announced officilly at this week's major Nokia event.

There are some smartphones that have 11g (at least here in Europe).

Mark Lanctot
2006-12-04, 19:51
I'd really rather not have to put my home network -- which is currently all 11g -- into mixed b/g mode. If I do, does the network take a performance hit even when there are no 11b devices around (ie, the PDA WiFi is switched off)?

I'm not 100% sure about this, but I believe if it's switched off, then no performance hit. If it's switched on, even if it's not connected to your SSID, there is a performance hit.

tyler_durden
2006-12-04, 20:46
11b is bad enough in handhelds, 11g probably sucks too much power. That's why you don't find it in PDAs that are meant to be small and portable.

Browsers like the default one in the Palm TX don't cache so they have to reload pages each time you want to display them. What is really needed is a browser that caches the web pages. 802.11b would probably be fast enough.

You might try looking for a PDA browser that caches...

TD

SuperQ
2006-12-04, 22:13
11b is bad enough in handhelds, 11g probably sucks too much power. That's why you don't find it in PDAs that are meant to be small and portable.
TD

That doesn't make sense. 11b and 11g use the same RF spectrum and power. The only difference is encoding technique. Yes, it could be possible that the OFDM decoder uses a bit more power.. but with the efficiency of modern wifi chipsets, it shouldm't be any different.

11g might use less than an 11b chipset, because the chip may be a newer, more efficient design.

gurpal2000
2006-12-05, 07:11
I need to replace my ancient PDA (Rex 6000, a great little product) and want one with WiFi. Besides using it for checking email at hotspots and such, I like the idea of using it as a remote for my 3 SBs. I was surprised to see that all the PDAs I looked at (including Palm TX and Dell Axims) only had 11b. Are there any out there with 11g?

I'd really rather not have to put my home network -- which is currently all 11g -- into mixed b/g mode. If I do, does the network take a performance hit even when there are no 11b devices around (ie, the PDA WiFi is switched off)? Thanks, and sorry about the slightly OT post.

Yes the Nokia E61 has 802.11g capability. I use the web browser on it to change tracks on my SB every now and then (when i don't have the remote handy!). Arguably the best "blackberry class" handheld. Check this out for screens: http://www.brighthand.com/default.asp?newsID=12408

aubuti
2006-12-11, 21:20
Thanks for all the suggestions. Unfortunately none of them quite work for me. The Nokia770 isn't a PDA, and trying to make it into one doesn't seem worthwhile to me. The Nokia E61 is indeed a great looking phone, but it (or any GSM phone) won't work in the Washington Metro tunnels, which I need. But I hope some perfect solution will come up soon, given that this is such a rapidly changing field (that is, except for Verizon's exclusive contract with Metro through 2009....)

Paul Webster
2006-12-12, 01:31
You could ignore the phone part ...
With the Siemens Pocket LOOX N520 you also get GPS.
I've never used one - so don't take this as a recommendation.

tommypeters
2006-12-14, 04:55
11b is bad enough in handhelds, 11g probably sucks too much power. That's why you don't find it in PDAs that are meant to be small and portable.
SpecTec has a Micro Secure Digital 11g card for PDA/Smartphones that only draws 188mA...

aubuti
2006-12-14, 07:09
You could ignore the phone part ...

Of course. That suggestion seems both obvious and counter-intuitive at the same time. Thanks for helping me see the forest through the trees.

And I wouldn't have to completely ignore the phone part. For $100 I could get prepaid T-Mobile coverage good for a year, useful for making calls those times I'm carrying the E61 but not my regular Verizon phone. And for the 2-3 months per year that I spend outside the US it can replace my current Nokia GSM phone.

Now just to come to grips with the price of the E61....

Paul Webster
2006-12-14, 23:33
FYI - I also have a Nokia N80, which also has 11g.
I did try it a couple of times with the PDA skin.
From memory, it worked but was not easy to use.
Small screen and lack of a touch interface on the phone made it cumbersome.
So I do suggest that you find a way to try it out before you buy.
I got this phone as a free annual upgrade and it working with Slimserver was a pleasant surprise.

jay_cee_in_da_house
2006-12-23, 21:57
Old thread I know... I'm not sure that either the E61 or the N80 are actually 802.11g. I've done throughput tests with my E70 over wifi and I get about 1 mbit/s. Now I guess that technically the waveform could be 802.11g, but I'm not sure what the point would be with such low throughput.

(I'm not ragging on the phones, I think 1 mbit/s is great)

Mark Lanctot
2007-01-09, 13:05
I read about some PDAs that use true 802.11g cards over an interface that can't support the speed, like SDIO.

Of course the 770's 802.11g card is internal, but perhaps it's connected through a slow interface.