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KlaymenDK
2006-11-05, 11:35
Hi all,
here's a rather complex question, I hope I can explain it properly. I am wondering whether I can use my SB3 as a wireless bridge in the following way.

The DSL socket is in my living room right next to my SB3, but all the other computing stuff is in the far end of the flat. Dumb. So currently, I have a cat5 cable snaking through my living room where it can be torn by pets, babies, roombas, ... not ideal (and ugly).
In other words, the LAN travels right past the SB in a cable, and then back again without one.

It would be much neater if the SB could sit on the DSL socket and bridge to the router wirelessly. The thing is: I have no idea how this bridging stuff works (or, for that matter, whether my router (a WRTG54GL running DD-WRT) can use the wireless adapter for its WAN side, and where that would leave my SB-to-Slimserver connection).

The main thing for me is security: how do I ensure the SB3 will only talk to me and not the neighbours?

Secondarily, of course I worry that the SB, being on the WAN side of the router, would no longer be able to access the server; and that the routers WLAN, being used for WAN, can no longer serve a LAN WLAN to my LAN clients (this latter point I of course should be asking in the DD-WRT forum, and is mentioned here chiefly for completeness).

Does anyone have applicable experience? Am I being an unrealistical optimist (as I must admit I do suspect)?

Mark Lanctot
2006-11-05, 11:55
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. As a wireless bridge, it receives wireless signals and can send them on to a device connected to the LAN port. In other words, it bridges wireless to wired, not the other way around.

If you connected it directly to your DSL, it could access SqueezeNetwork but it could not see your SlimServer.

And as powerful as DD-WRT is, I don't think you can put WAN on the wireless side. If you added a WAP it would, but see below.

Here's how you could get it to work, although it would involve making the SlimServer wireless, which is often a bad idea: put the router at the DSL port, wire the SB3 to it, get a wireless card for your PC and get it to connect wirelessly to your router. That actually might not be too bad. Although your SlimServer would be wireless, your SB wouldn't, so it's still a 1-hop arrangement. I'd think it would be worse than wired SlimServer/wireless Squeezebox but it would be better than having BOTH wireless.

azinck3
2006-11-05, 13:02
Actually, if your dsl modem has a router built into it (many do--mine, for example) then I'm pretty sure you can do what you want. You would not use the wan ports in your wrt54gl, you would turn off the dhcp server on the wrt54gl, setup client bridge mode on the wrt54gl, and be sure to turn on bridging on the sb3.

azinck3
2006-11-05, 14:47
Thought about this a bit more and my original post was wrong...that wouldn't work. But I was close. Don't set up your wrt54gl in client bridge mode. Just use AP mode. Everything else I said should be right. I'm pretty sure that'll work.

KlaymenDK
2006-11-06, 02:07
As a wireless bridge, it receives wireless signals
I thought I had read somewhere that you could do LAN --cat5--> SB ~~wlan~~> SB --cat5--> LAN, that would imply an SB could also send.

Nevertheless, thanks for shooting me down before I build too many castles in the sky! ;-)

Mark Lanctot
2006-11-06, 07:03
I thought I had read somewhere that you could do LAN --cat5--> SB ~~wlan~~> SB --cat5--> LAN, that would imply an SB could also send.

No. The SB has wireless bridge functionality as opposed to wireless access point functionality.

Now I suppose to be fully accurate, a wireless bridge also sends signals, otherwise how could the bridged device have upload access, but it can only be associated with the originating AP and no other wireless device. That's the difference between it and a WAP, a WAP can be associated with any wireless device. But a bridge can't be used as the basis for an ad-hoc network.

A WAP is a wireless router without a WAN port - it's a wireless switch that connects many devices together. A bridge only connects a wired LAN segment to a pre-existing wireless LAN (WLAN). If we were to use wired networking equivalents, a WAP would be a switch, connecting many devices, while a bridge would be a longer patch cord, connecting one device, although you could have a switch downstream of it.

azinck3
2006-11-06, 07:36
Again, if your modem has a router built-in (many do), then you can do what you want to do. wrt54gl serves as WAP and switch, your modem serves as dhcp server, router, and internet gateway. Let me know if you have any configuration questions.

Mark Lanctot
2006-11-06, 07:39
Yes azinck3 is right, if your modem has router capabilities and multiple ports built in, it would work fine.

I keep forgetting that, my modem only has one port and no routing capabilities.

azinck3
2006-11-06, 09:49
Yes azinck3 is right, if your modem has router capabilities and multiple ports built in, it would work fine.

I keep forgetting that, my modem only has one port and no routing capabilities.

Wouldn't even need multiple ports on the modem--mine doesn't but still is a router.