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paula1960
2006-10-16, 04:00
Hello,

I would like to know how it works if I buy a DS for my network and install Flipflip's ssods package on it and than connect it to my Mac.
Having next to no knowledge of linux ( although I installed a second harddisk in my Tivo years ago thanks to the great instructions provided) so I wonder can I access the SD from the mac to transfer music and backup other files.
Can I copy the music files from iTunes to the slimserver ssods install on the SD or at least make them accessible?
I hope the question is clear enough?
paula

SB3 and iMac OSX.4.8

mherger
2006-10-16, 04:06
I wonder can I access the SD from the mac to transfer music and backup other files.
Can I copy the music files from iTunes to the slimserver ssods install on the SD or at least make them accessible?

You won't need any Linux knowledge for this: SSODS is installed like any patch or firmware update on the DS via the web interface.

The DS's shares will be available on the Mac through the SMB networking. I don't know how it actually is called in OSX, but it's the standard method you're using to connecto to a Windows file server.

flipflip
2006-10-16, 05:14
Correct, Michael.

I think the manual of the DS addresses this.

And I think there is even an "administration" software which will setup the connection (at least under windows).

The only thing you have to configure in SSODS (or in SS) is the location of the files on the DS. That's documented in the README file (Installation instructions) and is independent from the computer you use to copy files to the DS.

Here's a link to the user guide of the DS.
http://download.synology.com/download/ds/DS-106e/UG/Syno_106_Series_UsersGuide_enu.pdf

Regards,
flip

paula1960
2006-10-16, 11:33
Thanks you both for your answers. To make sure that I understand this. I would format the DS under linux, install ssods and than be able to connect from my mac through the network.
Aside from that question would I be able to partition the DS into one linux/ssods partition and one mac os partition.
Thanks again for your help,
paula

flipflip
2006-10-16, 13:14
I would format the DS under linux, install ssods and than be able to connect from my mac through the network.
Aside from that question would I be able to partition the DS into one linux/ssods partition and one mac os partition.


Not quite. Once you installed the Harddisk to the DS, a program (which is on the CD you get with the DS) will setup the DS and the HDD inside. It will create two partitions. One fixed size (100 MB or so) for the system (Linux) and one covering the rest of the HDD. You cannot have more partitions. All partitions internally are in linux format ("ext3", with some hacks by synoplogy).

On the second partition you can setup as many shared folders as you want. There's one by default, called "public", which is world writable (can be changed). Then you can add other shares and users and setup read+write permissions for these. They will all be on the same partition.

You'll use these shares on the mac as "network" drives. You can access them as shares on a windows (or samba) file server or (i think) also via some mac protocol. Anyway, you'll be able to use these shares as storage for whatever files you want.

SSODS then can be configured to use any of these folders as its music directory. For example, if you store your mp3 collection in a folder "Music" on the "public" share, SSODS must be configured to use the (DS internal) path "/volume1/public/share". /volume1 is this second partition, "public" the folder corresponding to the "public" share and "Music" a top-level folder on the same.

The first attached USB storage device would be /volumeUSB1 etc.

It's probably a good idea to have different shares for different purposes. E.g. a "music" and a "data" share. Because only whole shares can be backed up to an attached USB storage or to another DS (using the included backup facility). And since the shares internally reside on the same partition, there will be xx MB free on the partition and not on an individual share.

Savvy?

:-)

flip

tommypeters
2006-10-16, 13:27
...and I think it's advantagous to backup to an eSATA drive instead of USB2. Over USB2 it takes around 18 hours to backup a full 500GB drive, I expect it to be faster over eSATA (just got my eSATA case, haven't tested). However, Synology recommends an "eSATA only" disk/case - the combined USB2/eSATA often have compatibility problems with Diskstation.

Good though, is that the backup is direct from the Diskstation to the backup disk - the data doesn't travel over the network and through the computer. :)

flipflip
2006-10-16, 23:39
Maybe.. but on the other hand, it will just copy what changed.. so it's only the whole 500 mb the first time.. at least in my setup.

And, if I understood you correctly, you backup to a USB plugged to your computer and then use a backup (copy) program on the computer?! I attach the USB disk to the DS and use the built-in backup facility That's what you want to do with the eSATA disk, isn't it? What's wrong with USB?

But I'd be interested to know how much faster it really will be. I think that the DS has a performance "issue" with the built-in backup. I reckon that not the whole bandwith is used over usb2. When I last monitored a backup it looked like 1-2 mb/s (shouldn't usb2 allow a multiple of that?). Maybe it's throttled to not interfere with users accessing files etc. I think "rsync" (which is used to backup) has that feature.

flip

tommypeters
2006-10-17, 13:52
No, I mean that it copies directly - of course I connect the USB2 disk to the DS and it handles the copy itself. That's obvious. It's just that my previous NAS sent the data over the network, through the computer and to the USB2 disk connected to it. It's also obvious that it was returned to the shop... ;)

I don't know either if the DS-106 throttles the transfer, I will see later. My intention for the eSATA I bought is to have it to extend the storage when the DS-106 gets full, the eSATA case is fanless and wouldn't add any noise. I would have the music I play more seldom on it, so it would only sometimes be turned on.

paula1960
2006-10-22, 13:51
Hi,

thanks you all for the replies. I have received my Diskstation and have installed ssods which worked pretty smooth. Thanks to Flipflip for the work that he has put into this software. It is much appreciated.
Now I have transferred some music and that works ok as well.
If I may ask a few more questions...
Can I add Itunes playlists? And can I add the Sirius plugin or Alien BBC that I used with slimserver on my mac?
Thanks again,
paula

flipflip
2006-10-22, 15:51
Can I add Itunes playlists? And can I add the Sirius plugin or Alien BBC that I used with slimserver on my mac?


Itunes support should work as before. I don't use it but a friend who does said something like "you can import itunes.xls [or so] into slimserver". I'm sure others here can explain that in more detail.. :-) Let me know if there are some limitations in SSODS regarding itunes. I'll add that to the documentation.

The sirius plugin i don't know either, but generally plugins should work as on other installations. I have sucessfully tested a few so far (see README.ssods), including AlienBBC. You have to add the plugin files to the Plugins folder which can be accessed as a network share (\\diskstation\SlimServer\Plugins) once you set access permissions in the diskstation admin interface. Another possibility is to add the files to the slimserver tarball and install that. AlienBBC needs a special config file on the diskstation, see README.ssods for details.

Btw, if the documentation of SSODS is missleading or incomplete for mac users, let me know (what to change/add). Input is always appreciated.

flip