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View Full Version : Experience with powerline ethernet?



Omri
2006-08-03, 22:47
I am using two Squeezeboxes with Mac OSX 10.4.7 and an Apple Extreme base station. I would say that about 60% of the time the wireless network functions beautifully...and 40% of the time it is a disaster, with frequent dropouts.

It would be expensive to wire my house with ethernet cable, so I am contemplating setting up a powerline ethernet network. I am wondering if others have had experience with this, and whether it results in stable listening.

Thank you.

Simon Still
2006-08-04, 00:10
A couple of friends are using it and are very pleased - one put a pair in to
link his router (which sits near his SB2) to the server PC which was just
far enough away that closing a door broke the wireless link.

They both said they were the easiest bits of IT kit they'd ever used - plug
in, connect wires, use.

bpa
2006-08-04, 00:49
I have Devolo Turbo and I find they work fine for networking for a wireless deadspt I have. I have the following observations:

1. Powerline network has analogous problems to Wireless: some pairs of sockets will have poor throughput, other equipment on "network" can affect transmissions (e.g. radiators on/off), some network equipment won't work.

2. I believe some brands have problems with Windows UPNP. These vendors are promising firmware upgrades.

3. AFAICT a lot of people use powerline point-to-point in conjunction with wireless and not a replacement such as: to reach a dead spot, place a wireless router in a better location away from broadband modem, add an additional accesss point.

The following article on recent Turbo models may be useful.
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/2006/02/06/homeplug_turbo_adapter_round/index.html


edit:

Link to some posts about UPNP powerline problems. This may only affect Slimserver if you using Rhapsody. However it may be a bigger issue if you using upnp more extensively.
http://forums.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/forum_posts.asp?TID=4800

consciouspnm
2006-08-04, 01:32
I use powerline ethernet to connect my SB3 to my QNAP TS-101 as wireless doesn't work through my Draytek router. I've not had any problems with it.

luga00
2006-08-04, 04:26
Yes, I use them all over the house. We live in a old Victorian cottage and wireless won't pass through the walls. I have 3 SB3's and a dedicated music server in a cupboard under the stairs. I use the powerline plugs for all the connections and they are fantastic.
The 85mbps ones typically give me around 60-70 mbps depending on which part of the house they are in.
If you can wait til October, the new 200mbps adaptors are coming onto the market.

bmccall
2006-08-04, 05:56
You must keep in mind that the electrical lines in your house are split - one half coming off one side of your service and the other half coming off the other side. As long as you are trying to transmit to the same side of the service Powerline works fairly well - even though some outlets seem to be dead. If you are trying to reach the other side of the service you will need a connector to have satisfactory service - these can be purchased from Smarthome.
In the long run and for the best service ethernet cable is far more reliable.

Ben

Loftprojection
2006-08-04, 07:44
After years of frustration with wireless I discovered these powerline toys. Man, is it a relief. I bought 2 at first just to link my desktop to the wireless router. After a week of heavenly "no more network" disconnect, I bought more powerline adapters to link everything, the desktop, laptop and SB2. No more wireless crap for me. By the way, mine are the TRENDnet - TPL-102E, cheap and does the job.

SadGamerGeek
2006-08-04, 07:50
Anyone know if these things live happily with X10 devices?

Cheers,

Richard

Pale Blue Ego
2006-08-04, 08:23
I'm using the Netgear XE-102 adapters for 2 of my SB3 connections and they are extremely reliable. I've been using them since January 2003 with zero problems. Only time I ever lost signal was after a power outage, and replugging the unit near the router fixed it in 2 seconds.

I'm getting 12.85 Mbps on one of the connections and 7.72 Mbps on the other. This is plenty of bandwidth for even uncompressed audio. If you want higher speeds,, there are 85 Mbps units available, but for SB3 that is overkill.

It's a nice technology. Unlike wired ethernet, you can move the connection to any plug in the house. And you don't have the problems associated with wifi.

One other bonus is that the technology has essentially paid for itself by allowing me to order the cheaper wired Squeezeboxes.

Milhouse
2006-08-13, 13:47
Question from the UK:

Anyone know if these powerline devices work OK when plugged into 4 or even 8-gang socket extensions? I may need to buy a pair of Powerline/Home Networking-type devices for my folks (85Mbps should do the trick) as I've just about given up trying to get decent 11g wireless coverage between ground and top floors of their house.

However there's a shortage of power outlets near the ADSL router (ground floor) so the powerline device may have to go in an extension socket assuming it will fit - how big are these devices, larger than a standard UK plug?

tommypeters
2006-08-13, 15:22
Yes, I use them all over the house. We live in a old Victorian cottage and wireless won't pass through the walls. I have 3 SB3's and a dedicated music server in a cupboard under the stairs. I use the powerline plugs for all the connections and they are fantastic.
The 85mbps ones typically give me around 60-70 mbps depending on which part of the house they are in.
If you can wait til October, the new 200mbps adaptors are coming onto the market.
They (Netgear) are already to be found in some shops.

gandt
2006-08-13, 23:25
Definitely better not to use them in a four way gang arrangement - much better to get them into the actual socket - even if into an adaptor (so the gang can be connected as well) but even in a four way ganag they do work - the throughput just goes down - though if you have the 85mg units you'll still get more than enough throughput for sb3. FWIW I also have abandoned using wireless with squeezebox and have found the powerline units fabulous.

gandt

mikerob
2006-08-14, 01:31
Question from the UK:

Anyone know if these powerline devices work OK when plugged into 4 or even 8-gang socket extensions? I may need to buy a pair of Powerline/Home Networking-type devices for my folks (85Mbps should do the trick) as I've just about given up trying to get decent 11g wireless coverage between ground and top floors of their house.

However there's a shortage of power outlets near the ADSL router (ground floor) so the powerline device may have to go in an extension socket assuming it will fit - how big are these devices, larger than a standard UK plug?

I'm using a pair of Devolo MicroLink dLAN adapters for a point-to-point link to a Squeezebox in the kitchen where wireless reception isn't great and cuts out when the microwave is on.

Both of the adapters are on 4-way extension leads. I've had absolutely no problems with them and I'm streaming FLAC.

I'm sure having the adapters on extension leads isn't optimal but it works fine for me.

The adapters are bigger than the typical plug so I needed to juggle around other plugs to get things to fit.

luga00
2006-08-14, 02:01
I echo what most have said here about using a fourway. There is a substantial drop in bandwidth but that may be acceptable depending on the usage.
Just as an aside, I found myself in the same situation in one of the rooms where the double socket was already in use. I found a 'triple' socket in B&Q, swapped it with the double and this worked absolutely fine.

Milhouse
2006-08-14, 02:02
Thanks for all the replies. :)

I'll get a pair of the Devolo 85Mbps units and see if can use a double adapter in the outlet. Alternatively, it sounds like they should work fine in the extension (although this may impair their performance I'm sure they'll be plenty good enough for the intended purpose - getting a 1Mbp ADSL connection to a wireless deadspot).

MrStan
2006-08-15, 06:28
I have found that I can use these devices reliably on a Power Block providing the Power Block lead is short, no more than a metre, and the Power Block has no mains filtering devices.

I do get the odd occasions when I get a period of dropouts which I suspect is due to local mains borne interference but these devices are still infinitely more reliable than WiFi.