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JeffCharles
2006-07-27, 20:43
Is it possible to remotely administer a Linux machine from XP Pro? I want to run Linux on a barebones box (with no keyboard or monitor) in the living room, connect it directly to my SB3, and then administer it over a wireless Lan from the XP Pro destop in the bedroom. It would run SlimServer and hold my music files.

By the way, the XP help system states that, "The most seamless administrative experience occurs when the computer that is used to perform administrative tasks is running the same operating system as the computer that is being remotely administered", so my guess is that if what I am asking is possble, it will not be easy.

Jeff

pfarrell
2006-07-27, 20:53
JeffCharles wrote:
> Is it possible to remotely administer a Linux machine from XP Pro?

Sure.

Or at least for 99 and 44/100 % of the time, you can do it.
All you need is a "X-windows" program, or even VNC.

You can even set it up using SSH so that access is secure.

I remotely administer my Mandriva machines all the time,
they have a pretty decent GUI for admin.

For the very weird stuff, I just plug a monitor and keyboard into
anything, but my SlimServer box has been up and running

Last login: Sun Jul 23 10:43:51 2006 from 172.16.4.41
(beatles)/home/pfarrell> uptime
23:52:10 up 403 days, 11:03, 2 users, load average: 0.28, 0.13, 0.11

over a year, and at no time during those 13+ months have I had
to touch the machine or use a monitor or real keyboard.

Of course, my preference is to put the SlimServer in the basement
so I don't have to listen to fan and hard drive noise with my
serious music

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

fathom39
2006-07-27, 20:54
PuTTY is a nice ssh client. Or, depending on your distro, administer the box via web browser.

NWP
2006-07-27, 22:18
I agree with the others. I have an ubuntu linux server and it hasn't had a monitor attached to it in months.

Use VNC if you need a graphical interface or putty if you just need a command line.

But the best part about a linux server is you really don't need to administer it. Once it is set up, it just runs and you can forget about it. Share your music directory and map it as a network drive so you can copy music to it from your XP machine.

notanatheist
2006-07-27, 23:55
I prefer the SSH client from ssh.com . The non-commercial version has two parts to it, a standard ssh shell and a secure FTP program. Makes it easier on you to transfer files over the network if you want "drag & drop" with a secure connection.

JeffCharles
2006-07-28, 07:42
Thanks to all for your replies. I am glad to hear that what I want to do can be done. I will have to learn some Linux, but I've wanted to do that anyway.

I especially like what NWP wrote: "But the best part about a linux server is you really don't need to administer it. Once it is set up, it just runs and you can forget about it." Sounds good to me.

Jeff

kefa
2006-07-28, 17:04
a really cool thing to do is simply install cygwin and select ssh on the install - you get a nice linuxy type command line too :-)

Andy D
2006-07-29, 04:26
For the odd occasion you do need to plug a monitor etc in it might be worth getting a remote admin board - AMI MegaRac, Peppercon Eric etc. - they're not cheap but occasionally come up on eBay for bargain prices.

Basically they allow you to drive the machine, edit the bios, reboot etc. remotely - some allow a remote CD too.

Mark Lanctot
2006-08-02, 20:18
Last login: Sun Jul 23 10:43:51 2006 from 172.16.4.41
(beatles)/home/pfarrell> uptime
23:52:10 up 403 days, 11:03, 2 users, load average: 0.28, 0.13, 0.11

Given the recent weather, this has me wondering - how do you manage that? Do you use a UPS?

The uptime on my router hasn't been longer than 2-3 days for about 2 weeks now due to all the power bumps. Not failures, just long enough to cause a reboot.

radish
2006-08-02, 21:01
Given the recent weather, this has me wondering - how do you manage that? Do you use a UPS?

The uptime on my router hasn't been longer than 2-3 days for about 2 weeks now due to all the power bumps. Not failures, just long enough to cause a reboot.
Not everywhere is having power problems - I'm just outside NYC and although Queens is pretty much an electricity-free zone right now we've been solid for as long as I can remember. Some power companies are better than others it seems :)

notanatheist
2006-08-02, 22:45
Given the recent weather, this has me wondering - how do you manage that? Do you use a UPS?


UPS on my fileserver, UPS on my big fish tank, UPS on my home theater, UPS on my main system, & battery in the laptop! Power outages are rare in Eugene but I use them for line conditioning too. My router's current uptime is only 36 days and the fileserver is at 54 days. Until I have an efficient means of transferring video over the network to a display along with surround sound I won't be touching the fileserver.

ComputerX
2006-08-02, 23:44
I'm compelled to post since at the moment I am doing the oposite. Using rdesktop on a linux laptop to control the W2K Advanced Server box that has my SlimServer on it. I just thought that was funny.


I especially like what NWP wrote: "But the best part about a linux server is you really don't need to administer it. Once it is set up, it just runs and you can forget about it." Sounds good to me.

That is dangerous advice. Unpatched computers are bad news. Historically unpatched unix-like machines were especially bad since a hacker could do more damage to your network from a unix-like macine than from a Windows machine. Now days I don't know if that is as true. Whatever you build you will need to keep it patched. Several distributions have automated ways of doing that. Personally I tend to build servers on SuSE since I have had very good luck with YOU (YaST Online Update.) The latest SuSE dropped YaST for something new that doesn't seem to work as well.

Don't expect linux to be easy. It can be a huge time sink.

If you are serious about *learning* linux, as opposed to *using* linux, you might want to try Gentoo. I have been a linux user for about seven years. Before that I was a user of FreeBSD, Irix, SunOS, and a little Solaris. I also admin a handfull of machines. I have learned as much in a couple months with Gentoo as I did in all those years with the others. You have to do frickin' everything by hand but you learn things like what the last two numbers in the /etc/fstab actually mean. I always wondered what they did. The Gentoo docs explained it.

Good luck, and don't sell Windows short. It really doesn't suck any less than the others.

Dan

mherger
2006-08-03, 00:26
> Not everywhere is having power problems

I can confirm this: I remember two outages in the past 5 or more years.
Once it was due to the company. And once it was my girlfriend blowing a
fuse while fiddling with some wiring - because she didn't want me to shut
down my server :-)

OTOH there are places where you simply can't work without a UPS: I've
spent a few months in Ouagadougou. There wasn't a day without blackout in
the building we were living in.

--

Michael

-----------------------------------------------------------
Help translate SlimServer by using the
SlimString Translation Helper (http://www.herger.net/slim/)

mherger
2006-08-03, 00:37
> That is dangerous advice. Unpatched computers are bad news.

Especially if they're exposed to the internet. But a SlimServer running in
my lan? I really don't care too much about security. I think security
should not be overrated when it comes to SlimServer. This latter should
never be run in public anyway.

> Good luck, and don't sell Windows short. It really doesn't suck any
> less than the others.

Correct. Windows as a product has improved a _lot_. We're not talking NT
3.51 any more, do we :-)? It's rather the company behind the product which
isn't my best friend...

--

Michael

-----------------------------------------------------------
Help translate SlimServer by using the
SlimString Translation Helper (http://www.herger.net/slim/)

Mark Lanctot
2006-08-03, 05:42
Not everywhere is having power problems - I'm just outside NYC and although Queens is pretty much an electricity-free zone right now we've been solid for as long as I can remember. Some power companies are better than others it seems :)

OT: Actually I was referring to recent storms.

Even though I've always been with the same power company, I've lived in many regions of the province of Ontario over the last 10 years and performance is dramatically different depending where you live:

Ottawa: extremely reliable, can go for years without failure

Sarnia: despite frequent storms, very reliable. I suppose it's due to the chemical plants in town who all need reliable electricity.

North Bay: extended power failure every time there's a storm. Power failures for unexplained reasons as well.

Espanola (northern Ontario near Sudbury): power failure every time there's a storm, but not many storms.

London: power failure every time there's a storm, and since London is Canada's lightning capital, that's 2-3 times a week in the summer. However the power failures are brief, 1-2 seconds. Makes it hard to maintain impressive uptime on a server though:

Uptime 8:18

:-P

pfarrell
2006-08-03, 06:15
Mark Lanctot wrote:
> pfarrell Wrote:
>
>>Last login: Sun Jul 23 10:43:51 2006 from 172.16.4.41
>>(beatles)/home/pfarrell> uptime
>>23:52:10 up 403 days, 11:03, 2 users, load average: 0.28, 0.13,
>>0.11
>
>
> Given the recent weather, this has me wondering - how do you manage
> that? Do you use a UPS?

Yes, of course.

> The uptime on my router hasn't been longer than 2-3 days for about 2
> weeks now due to all the power bumps. Not failures, just long enough
> to cause a reboot.

I have three or four UPS in my basement "server farm" which is
where I keep my SlimServer, my cable modem, my firewall box,
and the machine that hosts http://www.pfarrell.com/
It is really just some space next to the furnace and water heater.

There is a little one for just the cable modem and switches,
a moderate one for the slimserver and a huge heavy thing
for the dual-processor Xeon servers.



--
Pat Farrell PRC recording studio
http://www.pfarrell.com/PRC

snarlydwarf
2006-08-03, 08:23
Power outages are rare in Eugene but I use them for line conditioning too.

uhoh. you mean you're across the river from me?

(since I only know of one Eugene...)

rudholm
2006-08-03, 18:59
% uptime
6:56pm up 1515 day(s), 9:34, 1 user, load average: 0.03, 0.04, 0.04

No, this is not forged.

Mark Lanctot
2006-08-03, 19:04
% uptime
6:56pm up 1515 day(s), 9:34, 1 user, load average: 0.03, 0.04, 0.04

No, this is not forged.

UPS...or do you have a power plant in your backyard? :-)

rudholm
2006-08-03, 21:59
UPS...or do you have a power plant in your backyard? :-)

I do have a couple of large UPS units at home, but this particular host is one of a number of systems at work that have been up for over four years.

notanatheist
2006-08-03, 22:36
uhoh. you mean you're across the river from me?

(since I only know of one Eugene...)

You must be over in that place I hear of called Springtucky :) Then again I've always considered I-5 the crossing point since I'm only a few blocks from the river.

Ah, completely off topic. SSH!!

snarlydwarf
2006-08-03, 23:22
You must be over in that place I hear of called Springtucky :)

Exactly, why I get such reliable wireless connnections across the house: my neighbors don't have phones, let alone computers or networks.

Eugene is trapped in 1968, but over here it's 1958...

I'm not sure which is stranger.

Gildahl
2006-08-04, 08:17
I use SUSE and have found the following remote administration tools to be exceptional.

1. The NX thin client/server software from www.nomachine.com. This permits you to take remote control of your desktop from Windows. It is also true thin client software, so you can have multiple simultaneous users connected, each with their own desktop. It's great stuff, and much nicer than VNC, which I previously used and abandoned. It's exceptionally fast on a LAN--almost indistinguishable from a live session (providing you're not playing arcade games)--and remarkably fast over the web too.

2. The Webmin web administration software from www.webmin.com. This permits you to conduct administration of your system through any web browser. It is not remote desktop software, but will permit you to administrate and configure a wide variety of system software and settings. My primary uses for it are for shutting-down/resetting my machine, and for performing administration tasks for my MySQL databases. But Webmin's capabilities go much further should you need to do more.

Dave

SuperQ
2006-08-05, 12:04
Is it possible to remotely administer a Linux machine from XP Pro? I want to run Linux on a barebones box (with no keyboard or monitor) in the living room, connect it directly to my SB3, and then administer it over a wireless Lan from the XP Pro destop in the bedroom. It would run SlimServer and hold my music files.

By the way, the XP help system states that, "The most seamless administrative experience occurs when the computer that is used to perform administrative tasks is running the same operating system as the computer that is being remotely administered", so my guess is that if what I am asking is possble, it will not be easy.

Jeff


http://shipit.ubuntu.com

Grab a copy of ubuntu, it's very easy to install, update, and remotely admin. Built into the default settings is "Remote Desktop" using vnc. Once you login to the machine, you can select System::Preferneces::Remote Desktop from the menu. Click the apropriate checkboxes, and enable a password.

In the menu bar should be a familiar network icon, if you right-click on it and select Properties, there is a Support tab that will tell you the IP of the linux machine.

Then you just need a copy of VNC for windows from http://realvnc.com (free version is fine)

nickrout
2006-08-06, 17:57
If you simply want to log in over a system called ssh you can use a
windows program called PuTTY. It is an ssh client. It gives you a
command line interface to your linux box.

If you are not happy doing everything over the command line, you can use
vnc to communicate.

Shame the rest of the thread got so off topic about power supplies.


On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 20:43:06 -0700 JeffCharles wrote:

>
> Is it possible to remotely administer a Linux machine from XP Pro? I
> want to run Linux on a barebones box (with no keyboard or monitor) in
> the living room, connect it directly to my SB3, and then administer it
> over a wireless Lan from the XP Pro destop in the bedroom. It would run
> SlimServer and hold my music files.
>
> By the way, the XP help system states that, "The most seamless
> administrative experience occurs when the computer that is used to
> perform administrative tasks is running the same operating system as
> the computer that is being remotely administered", so my guess is that
> if what I am asking is possble, it will not be easy.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> --
> JeffCharles
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> JeffCharles's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=4034
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=25891
>
>

smc2911
2006-08-06, 22:53
I have three or four UPS in my basement "server farm" which is
where I keep my SlimServer, my cable modem, my firewall box,
and the machine that hosts http://www.pfarrell.com/

Following this link out of curiosity, I noticed that the site behaves very badly with firefox (displays the html source rather than rendering it). Also, even though there is an index.html in the root directory, the server doesn't seem to deliver it by default, so I'm just getting a directory listing (in both IE and firefox).

Apteryx
2006-08-07, 22:49
I'm no Linux head at all but manage to keep my headless FC5 working with VNC and/or Webmin as appropriate... VNC 'cause direct interaction with local applications is sometimes required, Webmin 'cause I can do things with it I don't know how to do otherwise. Apart from that, it runs Samba, so I synch my music to it from my XP capture/edit machine and very occasionally I might use PuTTY.

nonerz
2006-08-10, 03:27
I run my Zenwalk server headless without a particularly complicated setup. I have a VNC connection, but the GUI won't start remotely. I may fix it eventually, but I've lost too much sleep as it is trying to make linux work. Instead I just use Samba for file transfer and connect to Slimserver remotely.

Call that setup what you will, but it's a functional, easy setup for the linux-challenged.