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LHawes
2006-07-13, 18:29
After reading all the trials and tribulations from some of the NAS owners and knowing my technical skills won't extend to learning PERL or some other such computer stuff, does it make any sense to dedicate a litlte box as linked below to serve the same purpose?

I really am ignorant when it comes to the details of the Squeeze Box so I won't pretend to know the answer, but could a dedicated little box with a big ole hard drive act as a file server as well?

Or would it take a lot more than the simple exterior to get some things up and running well and efficiently?

Seems like you could hide it in a closet somewhere and let it sleep till needed or some
other plan. Would it work? Or is NAS the best solution for streaming from a source other than your main PC?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16856101483

pfarrell
2006-07-13, 18:49
LHawes wrote:
> After reading all the trials and tribulations from some of the NAS
> owners and knowing my technical skills won't extend to learning PERL or
> some other such computer stuff, does it make any sense to dedicate a
> litlte box as linked below to serve the same purpose?
>
> I really am ignorant when it comes to the details of the Squeeze Box so
> I won't pretend to know the answer, but could a dedicated little box
> with a big ole hard drive act as a file server as well?

Sure, you will need an operating system.
If you use Windows, all you need is to share files,
but a Windows license will double the price.

I'd recommend the SlimCD, which is a bootable Linux
with SlimServer preinstalled.


> Seems like you could hide it in a closet somewhere and let it sleep
> till needed or some
> other plan. Would it work? Or is NAS the best solution for streaming
> from a source other than your main PC?

I never understood exactly what a NAS is. Looks a lot like
a computer preinstalled for file sharing to me.

All you need is a computer that you know how to administer.
Windows, Mac, Linux, etc. are all fine.

> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16856101483

Looks like the right idea. Its barebone, so you will have
to add disks, memory, etc. And some need video cards.

One downside of the Shuttle and similar form factor computers
(and that is just what they are) is that there is not a lot of
room for disks. Depending on the size of your library, you
may find you need more than one disk drive. So you might be
better off with a mini-tower "normal PC" rather than
the small form factor Shuttle. But if it has what you need,
go for it.


--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

LHawes
2006-07-13, 19:07
Thanks for the reply Pat,

When you suggest SlimCD do you suggest that instead of Windows as an OS, or instead of the added expense of an OS? Both?

I know I can learn anything but I just don't feel like learing Linux, but again to your point, the cost increases even with a bare bones system.

Thanks again

Larry

pfarrell
2006-07-13, 19:17
LHawes wrote:
> Thanks for the reply Pat,

You're welcome


> When you suggest SlimCD do you suggest that instead of Windows as an
> OS, or instead of the added expense of an OS? Both?

Yes, the SlimCD uses Linux, is free, etc.
So you would not need a Windows license.


> I know I can learn anything but I just don't feel like learing Linux,
> but again to your point, the cost increases even with a bare bones
> system.

That is really a personal decision. Linux in a live CD like
the SlimCD is not hard, and it makes most of the administration
transparent.

But it is different, and even if it is easy, there is a learning
curve. So if you want to dabble in it, you can try, and
if you decide that it is too hard, then buy the Windows copy.
Just make sure that whoever sells you the computer will allow
you to buy the copy of Windows at the "with system" price, which
is cheaper than buying a copy Retail at your local computer store.

And administering any Linux will occasionaly require
some shell commands. A lot of Windows and Mac users
haven't touched a shell in decades. So it can
be off-putting.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

Kevin O. Lepard
2006-07-13, 20:32
>When you suggest SlimCD do you suggest that instead of Windows as an
>OS

SlimCD is free. Itwill run _instead_of_ Windows, and save you buying
a license for it.

See: http://www.herger.net/slim/detail.php?nr=763&kategorie=slim

>I know I can learn anything but I just don't feel like learing Linux,

Part of the idea is that with SlimCD that you can use it without any
fuss. Just boot it and go! :-)

I suggest trying the free solution to see how it works for you.
There's very little to lose.

Kevin
--
Kevin O. Lepard

Happiness is being 100% Microsoft free.

mherger
2006-07-13, 23:44
> I'd recommend the SlimCD, which is a bootable Linux
> with SlimServer preinstalled.

While I'm happy to see SlimCD so popular, I would _not_ recommend it as a
distribution to be installed on a dedicated machine by someone who does
not know Linux. While SlimCD makes a nice demo system and can be the base
for a very lean installation, it needs quite some know how about eg. Samba
to make it useful in a productive environment.

For the Linux newbie I'd rather recommend something like contribs.org or
ClarkConnect.com which offer hassle free installation, resonable
configuration and a nice web interface. And they're both free for the home
user.

> I never understood exactly what a NAS is. Looks a lot like
> a computer preinstalled for file sharing to me.

That's exactly what it is.

>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16856101483
>
> Looks like the right idea.

Looks like more than powerful enough!

--

Michael

-----------------------------------------------------------
Help translate SlimServer by using the
SlimString Translation Helper (http://www.herger.net/slim/)

mherger
2006-07-14, 06:41
> I'd recommend the SlimCD, which is a bootable Linux
> with SlimServer preinstalled.

While I'm happy to see SlimCD so popular, I would _not_ recommend it as a distribution to be installed on a dedicated machine by someone who does not know Linux. While SlimCD makes a nice demo system and can be the base for a very lean installation, it needs quite some know how about eg. Samba to make it useful in a productive environment.

For the Linux newbie I'd rather recommend something like contribs.org or ClarkConnect.com which offer hassle free installation, resonable configuration and a nice web interface. And they're both free for the home user.

> I never understood exactly what a NAS is. Looks a lot like
> a computer preinstalled for file sharing to me.

That's exactly what it is.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16856101483

> Looks like the right idea.

Looks like more than powerful enough!