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deserttaxguy
2006-07-01, 21:41
I dont like the rights management issues with the common commercial digital vendors and was wondering what the community suggests as the favorite sites. I just looked around one which I didnt like too much, but it did have total rights to the buyer of the tracks for all the independent or other artist looking to market on the internet. So, could you tell me your favorite spot to buy some tunes?
P.S. just to avoid hassle I stll just buy CDs on line and have them mailed to my PO box. I dont deal with the whole I-tunes, Windows media thing.. At least I get total control of the digits.

JJZolx
2006-07-01, 21:48
I dont like the rights management issues with the common commercial digital vendors and was wondering what the community suggests as the favorite sites. I just looked around one which I didnt like too much, but it did have total rights to the buyer of the tracks for all the independent or other artist looking to market on the internet. So, could you tell me your favorite spot to buy some tunes?
P.S. just to avoid hassle I stll just buy CDs on line and have them mailed to my PO box. I dont deal with the whole I-tunes, Windows media thing.. At least I get total control of the digits.
I still buy music from record stores, both brick and mortar and online. I wouldn't consider buying a download, even without the DRM issues, unless it was _significantly_ cheaper than the CD version of the same album and available in a lossless format. Also, I have no desire to only buy the one hit song from an album that's been played on the radio a million times.

stinkingpig
2006-07-01, 22:28
On 7/1/06, deserttaxguy <
deserttaxguy.2aawwz1151815501 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
>
> I dont like the rights management issues with the common commercial
> digital vendors and was wondering what the community suggests as the
> favorite sites. I just looked around one which I didnt like too much,
> but it did have total rights to the buyer of the tracks for all the
> independent or other artist looking to market on the internet. So,
> could you tell me your favorite spot to buy some tunes?
> P.S. just to avoid hassle I stll just buy CDs on line and have them
> mailed to my PO box. I dont deal with the whole I-tunes, Windows media
> thing.. At least I get total control of the digits.
>
>
http://www.emusic.com, and CDs -- in that order.

--
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin,
So across the Western ocean I must wander" -- traditional

funkstar
2006-07-02, 04:49
never bought music from an online store such as iTunes, never intend to either.

Still get all my CDs from local indipendant, high street chains, and online retailers.

John Rakestraw
2006-07-02, 05:22
On Sat, 1 Jul 2006 21:41:18 -0700
deserttaxguy
<deserttaxguy.2aawwz1151815501 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:

>
> So,
> could you tell me your favorite spot to buy some tunes?

Mostly I buy CDs from local and online stores, but I've bought about a
dozen albums from http://www.magnatune.com/. I like their policies (half
the purchase price goes to the artist, buyer can set purchase price in a
range from $5 to $18, wide choice of both lossless and lossy music
formats, no DRM) and their music collection is growing.

--
John Rakestraw

cparker
2006-07-02, 06:27
I dont like the rights management issues with the common commercial digital vendors and was wondering what the community suggests as the favorite sites. I just looked around one which I didnt like too much, but it did have total rights to the buyer of the tracks for all the independent or other artist looking to market on the internet. So, could you tell me your favorite spot to buy some tunes?

Has to be http://www.allofmp3.com/ for me.. you choose the quality of the tracks (costs slightly more the higher the quality) and no DRM. I downloaded 3 albums for just over Ģ5.

Definately the future of how music should be sold online!!

Michaelwagner
2006-07-02, 07:48
A word to the wise, or at least the wary.

If you scan the forums, you'll find many posts about the legality (or lack thereof) of allofmp3.

And aside from the legal niceties, it isn't clear that the musicians benefit from the sales on that site.

Oh, to answer the original question, I do most of my buying these days at a second hand music store. It's a chain that exists, AFAIK, only in S. Ontario. It's http://beatgoeson.com/ . They have a fairly decent tracking system, so if someone brings in a record you want anywhere in their chain, you find out about it by email overnight and can buy it before it goes on the shelves for the browsers.

When they don't have it, I go to a more mainstream music store, use a discount card.

mlmurray
2006-07-02, 08:37
Recently, I've used a couple of online stores that specialize in second-hand CD's. I've had very good experiences with them - the CD's I've received have been virtually indistinguishable from brand new - especially since I usually just rip them (in flac) to my hard drive and then store the originals.

The best prices for used CD's I've found have been at: http://www.secondspin.com/ , but I've gotten good service from http://www.caiman.com/ as well. Half the price of new cd's is quite common.

autopilot
2006-07-02, 08:50
I use AllOfMP3 from time to time.

It's what i like to call 'protest purchacing', because the more the record industry see's people buying from them, the more likely they will be to sort it out and offer better quality downloads at decent prices.

Also, even if the artist only got 1 penny from the sale, thats more than they would have done if i bought a second hand CD.

Well thats my excuse anyway!

cparker
2006-07-02, 10:38
A word to the wise, or at least the wary.

If you scan the forums, you'll find many posts about the legality (or lack thereof) of allofmp3.

And aside from the legal niceties, it isn't clear that the musicians benefit from the sales on that site.

AllofMP3.com sells albums for Ģ1, compared with iTunes' typical price of Ģ7.99. You cant tell me the artist would get another Ģ6 benefit out of it. Artists make their money out of airtime payments and merchandising anyway, its the record companies who make money on the sale of a CD. If you enjoy paying over the odds for music its your choice.

Its a case of AllofMp3.com bringing the free market to the consumer and about time to!

In addition, for your information;

"A spokesman for the BPI told silicon.com that it won't be setting the lawyers on any UK users of site: "While it remains illegal to use the site, we aren't interested in taking users to task - what we are doing is targeting the site itself."

In addition, to balance the argument;
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/06/07/bpi_sues_allofmp3/

Enjoy!

Michaelwagner
2006-07-02, 10:53
You cant tell me the artist would get another Ģ6 benefit out of it.
I wouldn't tell you that, because it's not true.

But they do get some money from CD sales.


Artists make their money out of airtime payments and merchandising anyway
Now that's not true. A goodly bit of their income comes from CD sales.

Its a case of AllofMp3.com bringing the free market to the consumer
I don't think that's correct.
As I understand it, and it's been debated in the fora here to death before, AllofMp3 is exploiting a loophole in Russian law. Regardless of whether it's letter-of-law legal, it's rather clearly not intent-of-law legal.

As you say, you can buy your music where you want. I just wanted to make the point, if you care about rewarding musicians for their work.

I'm not worried about Michael Jackson. I am worried about the little starving bands that do some of the best blues and soul music.

My solution, where possible, is to buy the CDs off the stage, from the band members themselves.

Where not possible, then I buy from the second hand store.

cparker
2006-07-02, 11:38
Ok, here is my final input on this, taken from;
http://blog.outer-court.com/forum/25240.html

The record company foots the bill for production of the CD. That includes recording, producing, and artwork (for the CD).
They expect the artist to help pay these expenses, so they arrange for an "advance", basically lending the artist the money needed for production.

The artist only makes money AFTER the record company has recooped that advance, and even then, it's only a very small percentage of the cost of the CD that the artist ever sees. Now, the artist has agreed to this, because the other source of income the artist sees does NOT come from the record company.

It's the "Royalties". Royalties are earned every time an artist's song is played on the radio or TV, as long as the artist wrote the song.
If someone else wrote the song and the band took that song and recorded it, the band makes no royalties. The writer of the song does.

If I write a song, and someone else records it and it gets massive airplay, I get rich, and the band only get's album sales, which is small.

That's because the writer of the song ownes the "publishing" writes to the material, and get's payed when it's used.

When you sign a deal with a record company, they then own half (it used to be half, maybe more now) of the publishing.

SO not only is the record company taking most of the song sales, but also over half of the royalties for the song/album.
The royalties are payed by a third party.

In Canada it's ASCAP; I'm not sure in the U.S. When you steal music, you're not hurting the artist, you're hurting the record company, and as I said above, "paybacks are a bi_ch" Artists and consumers alike have been ripped off by record companies for many years.

Now they're suing the already unhappy and ripped off customers for downloading music.

bephillips
2006-07-02, 11:45
If you want to screw the RIAA while supporting the artists, you may want to consider http://lala.com (currently USA only).

Trade used CDs, $1.50 for each trade including postage. The founder claims to give 20% of the profit to the artists who's music is being traded, or in cases where that isn't practical, to a foundation dedicated to providing health care and retirement benefits to working musicians. The founder says that if this takes off big, he hopes to funnel 90% of the profits to the artists in the future. Even now, this is a bigger piece of the action than artists typically receive from new CD sales.

I've done about 70 trades, so far mostly replacing things lost from my collection over the years now that I'm assembling a digital archive, but also some recent releases. I've even received some long out-of-print discs. Seems to be working well. Still in beta I believe, but I have some invitations, so I offer a lala invitation to the first five forum readers who contact me.

radish
2006-07-02, 11:48
There are plenty of artists who get no income from airplay because they're not played on the radio. They get all their income from sales, period. Sure it's a small proportion of the total retail cost of the CD, but it's 100% of their income. I know this for a fact because I know several artists and producers in this position - as well as being close friends with a indy label boss. Your description of how things works is at best misleading, and heavily slanted towards making people feel better about themselves.

radish
2006-07-02, 11:50
Its a case of AllofMp3.com bringing the free market to the consumer and about time to!
In the same way the guy selling "discount" laptops at the local pub is bringing the free market to the consumer?

cparker
2006-07-02, 12:04
There are plenty of artists who get no income from airplay because they're not played on the radio. They get all their income from sales, period. Sure it's a small proportion of the total retail cost of the CD, but it's 100% of their income. I know this for a fact because I know several artists and producers in this position - as well as being close friends with a indy label boss. Your description of how things works is at best misleading, and heavily slanted towards making people feel better about themselves.

In which case, are you going to find them on ITunes or AllofMp3.com anyway??

ddewey
2006-07-02, 12:12
Quoting Michaelwagner (Michaelwagner.2aboxb1151851801 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com):

>
> A word to the wise, or at least the wary.
>
> If you scan the forums, you'll find many posts about the legality (or
> lack thereof) of allofmp3.
>
> And aside from the legal niceties, it isn't clear that the musicians
> benefit from the sales on that site.

Here's how I get around this, in the very infrequent occasion what I want
isn't offered on emusic http://www.emusic.com or from the artists
themselves. Most of what I listen to is independent ('indie') rock.

- Buy desired item on iTunes.
- Delete tracks from iTunes.
- Purchase drm-free tracks from AllofMP3.

This way I gurantee that the artist gets the payment he deserves, which is
very important to me, and I also get drm-free tracks for about a dollar more
than just buying them through iTunes. If AllofMP3 ISN'T full of shit
(unlikely) and actually DOES pay the artist in their roundabout way, then
the artist may actually get paid twice -- sweet.

Once jhymn is able to de-DRM tunes bought from the iTunes store again, I'll
be able to skip steps 2 and 3.

dave

azinck3
2006-07-02, 14:33
In Canada it's ASCAP; I'm not sure in the U.S. When you steal music, you're not hurting the artist, you're hurting the record company, and as I said above, "paybacks are a bi_ch" Artists and consumers alike have been ripped off by record companies for many years.

Now they're suing the already unhappy and ripped off customers for downloading music.

You can debate how you think it ought to work and how what you're doing is "fair" all day long. And while I don't agree with you point-by-point, I certainly generally agree that the radio-airplay/record-company/music distribution model is pretty screwed up. BUT...in the end, the law is the law. There are lots of laws that we might not agree with, but it would be a pretty chaotic world if all it took was disagreement with a law to justify the breaking of said law.

Michaelwagner
2006-07-02, 21:16
It's the "Royalties". Royalties are earned every time an artist's song is played on the radio or TV, as long as the artist wrote the song.
If someone else wrote the song and the band took that song and recorded it, the band makes no royalties. The writer of the song does.
This works differently in Canada. The band is also paid in Canada.

I know because that's how a friend of mine earns money. She sang a trad song, ergo didn't write it, gets royalties if it's played on the air in Canada, but not if it's played in the states.

Michaelwagner
2006-07-02, 22:03
Ok, here is my final input on this, taken from;
http://blog.outer-court.com/forum/25240.html
Hardly an authoritative source. It's just some guy spouting off on a blog.

Diarmuid
2006-07-03, 10:11
And aside from the legal niceties, it isn't clear that the musicians benefit from the sales on that site.

Oh, to answer the original question, I do most of my buying these days at a second hand music store. It's a chain that exists, AFAIK, only in S. Ontario.

Wait a second!

You say that aside from the legal niceties (where as in fact it IS legal in Russia whatever the RIAA say) that it's not clear that the musicians get any money.

Then you go on to say that you buy second hand CD's !! You do realise that the musicians get none of your money either?

Michaelwagner
2006-07-03, 11:47
you buy second hand CD's !! You do realise that the musicians get none of your money either?

On the contrary.

This is like saying the used car market is unimportant to manufacturers of new cars.

A used marketplace enhances the value of products.

Suppose you buy the album from whomever. You don't like it. If you can sell it to a used CD store, who then sells it to me, you will have probably half the money you need to buy the next CD, from a band you like more.

If there was no marketplace in second hand CDs, you wouldn't have that money in your hands to buy the next new one.

It is correct that if I buy Michael Jackson's CD used, Michael doesn't directly get my dollars. But someone else will, indirectly, through the used CD dealer.

Just like a used car dealer enabling others to trade up and buy new cars.

Which is more money to musicians than allofmp3 is.

Diarmuid
2006-07-03, 13:27
On the contrary.

This is like saying the used car market is unimportant to manufacturers of new cars.



Which is not what I said.

I said that your money is not going to musicians.

What you said is true but you can also draw similar analogies with Allofmp3. Allofmp3 is increasing the exposure of bands to people who otherwise wouldn't listen to a band and as a knock on effect the band may benefit (via concerts, future sales, merch etc)

Secondly Allofmp3 is making money because it is providing a service that the consumer wants. no DRM, at a bit rate that you want. People could download the same music from p2p networks but are prepared to pay for the convenience. Why can't the RIAA provide this service? (because they know their business model is on the way out and they are on a money grab while things are still good)

Thirdly why is ok for large corporations to shop around in the world labour market and profit from labour laws in certain far off lands that would be illegal in the US/EU but if the consumer does the same well then that's bad ?

Also if the Recording Industry had it's way, your secondhand record store would be going the way of the dodo. http://www.planetgarth.com/gbnews/garth049.shtml

CEMA and three other major record firms--Time Warner's WEA, Matsushita's UNI and Sony Music Distribution--are under investigation by the Federal Trade Commission and have been the target of several antitrust lawsuits related to their policies against used CDs.


Finally I have spent 1000's Euro on CDs over the past 10 years but I'm sick of the attitude of the recording industry. I'm done with their greed and I despise they way they have politicians in their back pocket, willing to force through whatever the latest crazy bill they can come up with to further screw the consumer. F*ck them, I'm going to download from Allofmp3 jsut cause it pisses them off. I do pity the musicians that are caught in this but sooner or later this has to stop

Sorry for the rant.

stinkingpig
2006-07-03, 17:34
On 7/3/06, Diarmuid <Diarmuid.2adzbz1151958601 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>
wrote:
>
> ...
> Finally I have spent 1000's Euro on CDs over the past 10 years but I'm
> sick of the attitude of the recording industry. I'm done with their
> greed and I despise they way they have politicians in their back
> pocket, willing to force through whatever the latest crazy bill they
> can come up with to further screw the consumer. F*ck them, I'm going to
> download from Allofmp3 jsut cause it pisses them off. I do pity the
> musicians that are caught in this but sooner or later this has to stop
>
> Sorry for the rant.
>
>
or you could do as many have suggested in this thread -- patronize download
sites which do reimburse the artists, such as emusic or magnatune. There are
also many artists who operate their own websites and will be happy to sell
you stuff.
--
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin,
So across the Western ocean I must wander" -- traditional

nicketynick
2007-02-09, 12:44
I wouldn't consider buying a download, even without the DRM issues, unless it was _significantly_ cheaper than the CD version of the same album and available in a lossless format.

I totally agree. But the 'broader' marketplace doesn't seem to be recognizing that there are some of us out here (not enough of us I guess) who want to be able to buy lossless files. I'm somewhat dismayed that Pandora has 'partnered' with iTunes - my collection would be significantly larger if I was able to buy & download albums when the urge struck! Is there an alternative that I'm overlooking?

So I've been looking at emusic.com, but I can't seem to find a link to browse/search their catalog. I hate it when they try to sell you something without disclosing what it is they actually have to sell! ('free trial' notwithstanding!) Can anybody who is using emusic enlighten me?
In the meantime, I guess I'm going to have to continue to buy actual CDs.

snarlydwarf
2007-02-09, 12:58
So I've been looking at emusic.com, but I can't seem to find a link to browse/search their catalog. I hate it when they try to sell you something without disclosing what it is they actually have to sell! ('free trial' notwithstanding!) Can anybody who is using emusic enlighten me?
In the meantime, I guess I'm going to have to continue to buy actual CDs.

I buy from emusic, and still buy lots of CD's.

yes it is annoying to not be able to browse emusic without an account. There is a trick: if you enter at an album or artist page, it will let you browse. You just have to get past the front door.

http://www.emusic.com/album/10775/10775573.html will get you "in" so you can browse.

exile
2007-02-09, 13:14
nicketynick has stated the core issue. people want to buy lossless files and they don't want to pay the same amount as a physical cd because it's obviously highway robbery. therefore, currently allofmp3 is the best alternative.

i don't want to go to the cd store anymore (even though I once loved the notion-it's now completely obsolete in the digital age) and I'm not buying overpriced compressed files from itunes,etc.

whatever you think of allofmp3, the bottom line is that they are providing exactly what people want-choice- at a reasonable price.

fathom39
2007-02-09, 13:15
I can't seem to find a link to browse/search their catalog.

To go straight to search just enter www.emusic.com/about

nicketynick
2007-02-09, 13:23
Thanks, my friend! Took me a few minutes to find a link that made the search/browse toolbar come up, but I found it - I knew somebody here would be able to help out. And it looks like they have lots of stuff that I'm looking for, so I think I'll go ahead and try it out. Now if only they had flac available.....
Sooner or later (hopefully sooner) somebody outside of Russia is going to make a large library of flac/lossless downloads available for sale. In the meantime, I'm not sure I want to line the pockets of the Russian mafia.....

snarlydwarf
2007-02-09, 13:27
Sooner or later (hopefully sooner) somebody outside of Russia is going to make a large library of flac/lossless downloads available for sale. In the meantime, I'm not sure I want to line the pockets of the Russian mafia.....

Well, EMI is supposedly talking to Emusic and others about releasing their whole catalog online.

If they stole the "get it encoded at whatever you want" feature of allofmp3, they could make a killing.

nicketynick
2007-02-09, 13:32
Well, I hope you're right, and EMI (and other labels will follow) agrees there is money to be made. It would be a good thing! (and would involve a different sort of 'killing' than the Russian mafia might partake in :-P )

Soulman
2007-02-09, 14:38
Regarding AllofMP3:

They "sold" my CDs at a given time (look for artist "Antizycle", donīt know if they still do it) I have NEVER seen ANY money nor has my label.

You think thats okay?

Other then that: I still most of my records in a real store. Get home, rip them, scan the cover, file the CD ... sometimes I sel abunch of CDs on ebay.

bdelp
2007-02-09, 14:56
I've bought a bunch from a local pawn shop. This brings up an ethical point. Since the artist receives no $$ from the sale is this really kosher? What if I rip the disc and then sell it back to the pawn shop?
BD

ceejay
2007-02-09, 15:00
We've been here a few times before ... personally I think that if you sell a CD (on eBay or anywhere else) you've just lost the right to keep the ripped copies. Consider the CD as a "licence to use".

OK, the law may not have caught up with fair use yet but if and when it ever does, it will almost certainly say that you have a right to make copies of a CD you *own* to play in various devices.

Once you've sold it you don't own it any more.

YMMV
Ceejay

jeffmeh
2007-02-09, 15:26
We've been here a few times before ... personally I think that if you sell a CD (on eBay or anywhere else) you've just lost the right to keep the ripped copies. Consider the CD as a "licence to use".

OK, the law may not have caught up with fair use yet but if and when it ever does, it will almost certainly say that you have a right to make copies of a CD you *own* to play in various devices.

Once you've sold it you don't own it any more.

YMMV
Ceejay

I think you summed it up quite well.

Soulman
2007-02-09, 15:28
Yes, thats probablby true.

I personaly do not sell CDs I still listen to. But having a collection of way ofer 3000 CDs, I do sell dublicates or stuff I never listen to... I admitt, that I do NOT follow up these sold CDs in my DB always and delete them.

So currently CDs are piling up EVERYWHERE in my house.

Boy.

Kevin O. Lepard
2007-02-09, 16:30
Still buying CDs, often used. It gives me uncompressed, DRM-free
music, is entirely legal, and provides me with a reasonably robust
physical backup (the pressed CD) that I store in minimal space in
binders (tossing the jewel case).

Kevin
--
Kevin O. Lepard

Happiness is being 100% Microsoft free.

andy_c
2007-02-09, 16:37
I've been buying my CDs online from deepdiscountcd.com. Their prices are generally pretty good, and free shipping is always available in the U.S. via USPS. They pack the CDs well, and I haven't had a damaged jewel case so far. Selection is not the best, but not bad either. On a couple of occasions I have canceled orders that did not ship after a month from the order date. But my last two orders with them have shipped promptly.

Another outfit I've bought from is djangos.com. Their prices are just a little bit higher than deepdiscountcd.com, but their selection is better. Once in a while they have a free shipping promotion, but most of the time there's a shipping charge. I have only ordered from them once when they had the free shipping promotion. Shipping was via USPS. Unfortunately, the CD was not packed well and it arrived with a big crack in the case. This was disappointing.

Nowadays I listen a lot to some really good jazz stations on internet radio. I have a laptop on a table next to my listening chair where I control my squeezebox via the web interface. If I hear something I like enough to buy it, I open up a new tab in Firefox and google the artist and song to find out what album it's from. Then I check deepdiscountcd.com to see if they have the album. If so, I order it. This is neat, because I don't even have to get up from my listening chair. I feel like George Jetson or something :-).

David Alexander
2007-02-09, 19:43
I've recently been buying CD's from cdbaby.com. In fact I just
received a box full today. I've found some really excellent music
there. It's all independent so you'll never hear any of it on the
radio but that has no bearing on the quality. Best of all the artists
actually get paid, I think cdbaby keeps $4 and gives the rest to the
artist. The artist sets the price. Heck, they even tell the artists
who bought their CDs and I often get a thank you email from them,
which is a nice touch.

For commercial stuff I check secondspin.com for used discs, and also
Amazon.com where I sometimes buy new and sometimes used.

I won't buy digital music online unless it's equal or better quality
than a CD, costs less than a CD to account for the reduced
manufacturing costs, and can be played on my SB and other devices with
a minimum of fuss. In other words, I don't buy digital music online.

Nostromo
2007-02-09, 20:48
Mainly CD's. The problem with CD's is that most of them only have a few good tracks on them. You're lucky if half of the tracks are worthwhile.

Bought a couple of albums and a couple of tracks on iTunes music store. Never again. The main problem isn't the DRM: you can easily burn on CD the music you bought on iTMS and then rip it anyway you like. The problem I have with is the low quality of the tracks. If the tracks were in Apple lossless, and at the same price, I would download tracks like crazy.

Beatport is interesting if you like electronic music and you're looking, for example, for that hard to find remix. There's no DRM and you have the option between MP3 320 kbps (IIRC) and WAV. But the WAV files are quite expensive. I hear some independant labels sell their music online, without the DRM.

peter
2007-02-10, 01:57
Soulman wrote:
> Regarding AllofMP3:
>
> They "sold" my CDs at a given time (look for artist "Antizycle", donīt
> know if they still do it) I have NEVER seen ANY money nor has my
> label.
>

Maybe nobody ever downloaded any...
You're not on demonoid either (small consolation)

> You think thats okay?
>

Well, it's a good way of showing the labels and artists what the
customers want. (and are prepared to pay for).

> Other then that: I still most of my records in a real store. Get home,
> rip them, scan the cover, file the CD ... sometimes I sel abunch of CDs
> on ebay.
>

You mean, you rip them and then you sell the original? There's some
double standards in this. The same type of double standards we saw when
we had to buy expensive CD versions of records we already owned. That
kind of thing makes me feel less guilty about having demonoid in my
bookmarks ;)

Regards,
Peter

ModelCitizen
2007-02-10, 02:48
That kind of thing makes me feel less guilty about having demonoid in my bookmarks ;)
Regards, Peter
There's no reason to feel guilty for having any of the private music trackers in your bookmarks. We've been ripped off for years. I've bought the same music in multiple very overpriced formats. An intelligent mixture of buying music (i.e. independents, small artists, small remastering companies) and downloading perfect lossless rips is not something to be ashamed of... especially considering that much of the music I like is out of print and very hard to get hold of (even second hand).

I won't even mention the criminality of DRM (thank god some European governments have the guts to challenge it.... mind you it'a a bit late now... even Steve Jobs has seen the way the tide/dollar is turning).
Damn, I mentioned it.

No Antizycle stuff has been uploaded to any of the trackers I use either.

MC