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Mark Lanctot
2006-05-15, 10:19
Interesting article:

http://www.computeractive.co.uk/personal-computer-world/news/2155861/web-gets-listeners-fm

It's regarding the London, U.K. market but it's interesting nonetheless.

SoundBoy
2006-05-15, 18:51
Mark - the none existing quality of the "normal" self-announced commercial free radio was the reason I bought a Squeezbox. I do not really need to stream my Itunes library.. nice to have, but I just wanted to be able to listen to Internet Radio without the need of a new computer... because radio here s... smile

Cheers


Interesting article:

http://www.computeractive.co.uk/personal-computer-world/news/2155861/web-gets-listeners-fm

It's regarding the London, U.K. market but it's interesting nonetheless.

rudholm
2006-05-15, 20:10
I live in Los Angeles, which is probably the center of the recorded entertainment world and yet, somehow, commercial radio here manages to be horrible. A couple of the college stations have some good shows, and one of the commercial stations is ok compared to the rest (but that's not saying much).

For the most part, commercial radio is eating itself alive by playing only music that they're sure will attract an existing audience, which is material we've all heard before. Every station is basically an "oldies" station (e.g. Jack FM and KROQ). Market research only takes you so far. I don't think it's P2P that's eating into sales, it's the huge media companies like ClearChannel, Westwood One , and Viacom and all their monotonous programming. Nobody takes any risks, and thus nobody breaks new artists.

Add to that the fact that every contemporary AOR station in LA has blathering fools on for the morning "drive time" time slot and it really just makes for a pointless medium.

Now that I have Pandora, I doubt I'll ever listen to local radio again, which is really too bad, I used to like it quite a lot. It used to not suck. Now I just need to get Pandora into my car...

Mark Lanctot
2006-05-15, 20:26
I haven't listened to radio in almost 10 years.

It's exactly like rudholm states - which is bizarre as the markets are separated by thousands of miles, political and cultural boundaries and climate. Yet the problems are the same. Repetitive, formulaic music, inane, stupid "radio personalities". Unlistenable.

When you hear the same song twice in one hour, and when you hear the same song twice in one hour the next day at exactly the same times, you come to realize that after you hear about a week of that tripe, the rest is all the same.

At the time I stopped listening to radio, I decided to give it a chance about a month later. The same songs, the same idiotic radio chatter, the same annoying commercials. Bleh. I imagine if I was to turn the radio on today it would be like I never turned it off.

I used to listen to Internet radio a lot more when I first got my Squeezeboxes. It was much, much better. I'm not listening to it as much anymore now that my music library is a decent size, but I'd like to go back again.

Seriously, how much longer can commercial radio keep this up? And does anyone with an IQ above 75 listen to it? Either my IQ estimate is way off or people appreciate repetitive, mind-numbing drivel more than I do, because I see no signs of it getting any less popular. Which is sad.

stinkingpig
2006-05-16, 07:35
On 5/15/06, Mark Lanctot <
Mark.Lanctot.27vs3z1147750201 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
>
> I haven't listened to radio in almost 10 years.
>
> It's exactly like rudholm states - which is bizarre as the markets are
> separated by thousands of miles, political and cultural boundaries and
> climate. Yet the problems are the same. Repetitive, formulaic music,
> inane, stupid "radio personalities". Unlistenable.
>
> When you hear the same song twice in one hour, and when you hear the
> same song twice in one hour the next day at exactly the same times, you
> come to realize that after you hear about a week of that tripe, the rest
> is all the same.


It's been about the same amount of time for me, but I still listen to public
radio (http://www.kqed.org) and college radio (http://kalx.berkeley.edu is
great). I also travel a lot and sometimes forget my fm adapter, so that
leads to scanning the radio market all over the Western US. It is about the
same all over.


At the time I stopped listening to radio, I decided to give it a chance
> about a month later. The same songs, the same idiotic radio chatter,
> the same annoying commercials. Bleh. I imagine if I was to turn the
> radio on today it would be like I never turned it off.



I used to listen to Internet radio a lot more when I first got my
> Squeezeboxes. It was much, much better. I'm not listening to it as
> much anymore now that my music library is a decent size, but I'd like
> to go back again.



I listen to a bit of Internet radio, but honestly, not that much. Finding or
remembering a station is a pain, and just because KRCC was playing good
music that time I was in Colorado Springs and my iRiver's battery died,
doesn't mean they're playing good music right now. When I want a radio-like
experience and I'm not home, I tend to just play Last.FM through my laptop.
When I'm home, it's easier to turn on a radio and listen to KALX or KQED.


Seriously, how much longer can commercial radio keep this up? And does
> anyone with an IQ above 75 listen to it?



Now, my wife listens to KFOG (http://www.kfog.com) and has for a very long
time. In the afternoons they're just as bad as any of the others, but their
morning and weekend people predate the decade-long slide into audio hell and
they do still play some decent shows. I have no idea why this situation
persists, I can only assume that it's part of Chancellor's control group or
something. Anyway, even when KFOG is playing utter crap, I notice that my
wife barely hears it, it's just background noise. Personally, I can't tune
out anything except electronica (hello Groove Salad) or classical.

--
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin,
So across the Western ocean I must wander" -- traditional