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Harris2508
2006-04-07, 17:40
I know this will seem a stupid question, nevertheless I'm hoping someone will have a suggestion.

Slimserver and Squeezebox will play well from the internal drive on my system, however, since my media is normally all on a NAS drive I'd like it to connect with that drive. For some reason I cannot get the Slimserver to recognize my NAS which is mapped as Drive M on my system. Everything else connects nicely to it. The NAS is a DLink DSM-G600.

I'm sure this is something simple that I'm overlooking. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a lot!

Bob Harris

JJZolx
2006-04-07, 17:52
Slimserver and Squeezebox will play well from the internal drive on my system, however, since my media is normally all on a NAS drive I'd like it to connect with that drive. For some reason I cannot get the Slimserver to recognize my NAS which is mapped as Drive M on my system. Everything else connects nicely to it. The NAS is a DLink DSM-G600.

1. Assuming you're running Slim Server as a service on Windows, you need to run the service using a user account, not SYSTEM. The local SYSTEM account has no access to anything on the network.

2. Use a UNC style path instead of a mapped drive letter. When the service starts up, it won't know the mapped drives that you've set up for yourself. A UNC share name looks like:

\\MachineName\ShareName\folder\...

The \folder\... part isn't needed if your library is in the root directory of the share.

Harris2508
2006-04-07, 19:25
Jim,
Thank you very much for that advice. Your suggestions make sense. I'll follow them. I really appreciate your speedy reply to my question.

--Bob

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 04:01
Hi Bob and SlimDevice,

I am also thinking of connecting my SB to a NAS drive. My question is; can the SqueezeBox play the mp3 on the NAS, eventhough my laptop (or computer) is switched off? That really would be great, as in that case I don't need to always have my laptop (or desktop) switched on.

Regards,

Hein

Siduhe
2006-04-10, 04:25
Hi Bob and SlimDevice,

I am also thinking of connecting my SB to a NAS drive. My question is; can the SqueezeBox play the mp3 on the NAS, eventhough my laptop (or computer) is switched off? That really would be great, as in that case I don't need to always have my laptop (or desktop) switched on.

Regards,

Hein

What you want to do is possible, but only if the NAS solution you are using can run Slimserver itself. You have to have Slimserver running somewhere on something, for the SB to work. Various NAS solutions can do this - the Buffalo Linkstation, the Infrant ReadyNAS and the QNAP101 to name a few.

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 04:31
Thank you very much for your quick respons. I will search the web now to gather more inforamtion about the NAS drives you mentioned. Can you tell me anything about the possibilities of the "Lacie Ethernet Disk mini"?

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 04:52
Could you tell me which Model of ReadyNAS will work for me?

Siduhe
2006-04-10, 05:34
According to the Infrant website, all of these:

http://www.infrant.com/ReadyNAS_family.htm

As I understand it, Infrant produce their own version of slimserver and so you may be limited what plugins you can put on. I would search the boards for more info (I've only used the Linkstation solution).

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 05:36
Could you also say something about the Lacie Ethernet Mini

Siduhe
2006-04-10, 05:40
If I could, I would have. My preference is only to talk about things I have some proper knowledge of.

Have you tried using the search facility to look at the previous threads on that very issue ? They suggest it is a) possible, b) tricky and c) unsupported by Lacie.

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 05:43
Ok, thanks, I'll check the threads further.

Regards,

ein

Gildahl
2006-04-10, 07:29
Just to go out on a limb and suggest something else to think about. I investigated some NAS solutions, but found them kind of expensive. I wanted to go dirt-cheap, yet have the power to run "real" server software. With a little scrounging around, I came up with enough parts to build a bare-bones box (750Mhz PIII, 256MB RAM) for less than $20. In this I put an old spare 8.5GB hard drive to hold an OS, and a 200GB Seagate that I just picked up at a CompUSA "Midnight Madness" sale for $29.95 (after rebates) for data storage.

My initial plan was to just install FreeNAS (www.freenas.org). This free Linux-based software lets you turn any modest PC box into a completely effective NAS storage device. I had zero Linux experience, but doing this actually turned out to be much easier than expected and worked like a charm. So in one evening's project I now had my cheap NAS. But I still had the issue of not being able to run the Slimserver on it. So I decided to abandon FreeNAS and try a full Linux distribution. After a little research I chose SuSE Linux 10 (www.opensuse.org), and have not regretted that decision.

This distribution includes the Samba server which permits you to share drives on the Linux box with your Windows machines. Furthermore, since this is a "real" Linux distribution, you can run the Linux version of Slimserver on it--which, strangely, seems more responsive on this lowly machine than on my 2.6Ghz Windows XP box! Once the SuSE box is attached to the network, you don't even need a keyboard, monitor, or mouse for it at all. In fact, you can put in a closet if you want. Just install the FreeNX thin client server software (freenx.berlios.de) to the Linux box and Windows client (www.nomachine.com) to your Windows machine. This will enable you to do remote management of the Linux box on your Windows machine (similar to remote desktop, but better).

You can stop at this point and run this thing as a full-blown 24-hour availability LAN and Internet music server, but I went ahead and setup a few more things. First, I attached a printer and turned on print services. Magically, I now had a print server. I also installed Webmin (www.webmin.com) to remotely manage and configure the server over the web. This software is very cool if only for the feature that permits you to reboot the machine from anywhere you can access the Internet. Finally, I installed MondoRescue (www.mondorescue.org), a remarkable backup solution that supports writing bootable restore disks directly to CD/DVD/RW and/or iso images.

Oh, and did I say that all of this software is free? It is. And did I say that it was easy to setup? Well, I can honestly say that setting up FreeNAS was, but setting up SuSE and all the other stuff was a definite challenge. Especially for a Linux novice like me. But it is now two weeks later and everything works perfect and is highly stable. Can I say it was worth it?

Yup. ...and cheap.

Dave

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 07:45
Does that mean that you have installed slimserver on Buffalo Linkstation?
So, does it run now without your PC switched on? Or did you hack it? And... can yiu tell me exactly which Linkstation you are using? Does it need to be the Gigabit Linkstation, or will the normal Linkstation be ok?

Regards,

Hein

nicketynick
2006-04-10, 08:24
Inspirational - and very convincing. I have a similar old machine taking up space which should be perfect for the job. I just need to make it run more quietly first, the power supply fan sounds like a jet turbine - guess I'm off to the computer shop in the next few days!

radish
2006-04-10, 09:21
Some useful links

http://www.silentpcreview.com/
http://www.endpcnoise.com/
http://www.quietpc.com/

nicketynick
2006-04-10, 09:58
Some useful links

http://www.silentpcreview.com/
http://www.endpcnoise.com/
http://www.quietpc.com/


Thanks radish!!

Gabriel Montemurro
2006-04-10, 10:03
What you want to do is possible, but only if the NAS solution you are using can run Slimserver itself. You have to have Slimserver running somewhere on something, for the SB to work. Various NAS solutions can do this - the Buffalo Linkstation, the Infrant ReadyNAS and the QNAP101 to name a few.

In reference to the Buffalo LinkStation: is this the LinkStation Home Server HS-D300GL (which is DLNA certified) or is it the standard LinkStation HD-H250LAN?

Thank You, Gabriel

nicketynick
2006-04-10, 10:14
For the $$ required to make an old PC quiet (for NAS use), wouldn't you be just as far ahead just to get the NSLU2 (slug)? Or is it worth it for the faster CPU & bigger memory? (if somebody sold an out-of-the-box slug, where all you had to do was plug it in and install your preferred version of SlimServer.....)

Gildahl
2006-04-10, 11:18
I went with a decidedly low-tech approach to quieting the machine. I had some sheets of thin styrofoam in my basement and lined the inside of the case with them. I made sure I didn't cover-up any vents and carefully monitored the temperature afterward. Purrs like a cat now, and it is actually much more quiet than a two drive external enclosure that I have nearby.

nicketynick
2006-04-10, 11:34
Hmmmm, good idea.... I'll need a new power supply at least though - the thing squeals like a pig until its warmed up, so the fans bearings must be in bad shape. So, instead of spending $100 (CAD) on a new power supply, maybe I should direct those $$ towards a slug, if it can be just as easily set up to run SlimServer, and dead quiet at that. Anybody have any thoughts one way or the other?

Siduhe
2006-04-10, 11:56
In reference to the Buffalo LinkStation: is this the LinkStation Home Server HS-D300GL (which is DLNA certified) or is it the standard LinkStation HD-H250LAN?

Thank You, Gabriel

Hein / Gabriel,

I am referring to the standard Linkstation HD250LAN - but you need be a bit careful whether you have a PPC or an MIPS version of the Linkstation as the installation process is a little different. They are not two seperate products, but different versions of the same product. Buffalo swapped the processor to the more powerful MIPS some time in 2005 AFIAK. Most Linkstations for sale now will be MIPS, I believe.

I can do no better than refer you to the excellent instructions by Marc D. Field below:

http://fieldnetworks.com/slim/linkstation.html

I followed these on a PPC Linkstation and as a total Linux / Slimserver newbie (some time ago now) without any real problems. I found the old PPC Linkstation more than adequate for my initial needs, but a bit underpowered (i.e. slower rescans and web browsing, and you can't run things like Alien BBC on it). A couple of years and a few thousand songs later, I now run a dedicated music server.

The new MIPS version of the Linkstation is a bit more powerful and I believe some people have even managed to get Alien BBC up and running on it.

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 13:15
Thanks very much

heinkraanen
2006-04-10, 13:18
Thanks very much. Looks like I am going to purchase a Linkstation. You're idea is by the way also not too bad.....just using a dedicated music server. I suppose you mean, you just have a seperate desktop/laptop to run slimserver and store your music?

Cheers,

Hein

Siduhe
2006-04-10, 13:45
Hein,

Exactly right. Lots of people use an old laptop or PC, but I built a Cube PC from scratch using a few reclaimed parts and some purchased from new. It worked out cheaper than a new PC or NAS, even though I paid a bit extra for a "quiet" type fan setup. Also installed a second disc drive.

It runs a slimmed down version of XP, Slimserver and Music IP only and has been working flawlessly for the last four months. [Touch wood]

HTH

aubuti
2006-04-10, 20:20
Hein / Gabriel,

I am referring to the standard Linkstation HD250LAN - but you need be a bit careful whether you have a PPC or an MIPS version of the Linkstation as the installation process is a little different. They are not two seperate products, but different versions of the same product. Buffalo swapped the processor to the more powerful MIPS some time in 2005 AFIAK. Most Linkstations for sale now will be MIPS, I believe.

I can do no better than refer you to the excellent instructions by Marc D. Field below:

http://fieldnetworks.com/slim/linkstation.html

I followed these on a PPC Linkstation and as a total Linux / Slimserver newbie (some time ago now) without any real problems. I found the old PPC Linkstation more than adequate for my initial needs, but a bit underpowered (i.e. slower rescans and web browsing, and you can't run things like Alien BBC on it). A couple of years and a few thousand songs later, I now run a dedicated music server.

The new MIPS version of the Linkstation is a bit more powerful and I believe some people have even managed to get Alien BBC up and running on it.

AFAIK, Buffalo is continuing to produce LinkStations with PPC processors as well as MIPS. It depends not only on older vs. newer LinkStations, but also on the model line.

HD-HG ('gigabit') are 266MHz PPC with 128MB RAM

older HD-H are 200MHz PPC with 64MB RAM

newer HD-H are 400MHz MIPS with 64MB RAM

I know that comparing speeds of different processor families is not always straightforward, so I don't honestly know if a 400MHz MIPS is faster than a 266MHz PPC. I am running slimserver on an HD-HG250, and it does fine driving 2 squeezeboxen.

For additional details on the Linkstation hardware configuration, see the "Hardware" section of http://linkstationwiki.org/Information/Information

Then there's the new LinkStation 'Home Server' line (HS-D). I couldn't find processor and RAM information on the Buffalo site, and as far as I know no one has posted hacks for opening this box's system to run slimserver.

heinkraanen
2006-04-12, 07:42
Gents,

I encountered in my quest another product, the FSG-3 Storage Gateway of Freecom. Not only a network drive, but other features are....
Mail server
File server
Backup server
Web server
FTP server
Netwerk router
USB print server
S-ATA enabler
AV server
Firewall
Firmware upgradable
3.5" HD (7.200rpm)
160GB t/m 500GB

I will contact the company to ask about installing slimserver on it.
Here is the link to the data sheet. http://www.freecom.com/objects/00006162.pdf

I'll let you know if as soon I have found out.

Regards,

Hein

Des
2006-04-12, 07:57
I couldn't see any reference to a Mail Server on that link. Is this a feature?

heinkraanen
2006-04-12, 08:06
Yes it is. If you go to freecom.com and search the for the FSG-3 you will find all the feautures. Here is the link.... http://www.freecom.com/productsubs.asp?CatID=8070&sCatID=80703

You might not be able to understand everthing, cause it's in Dutch, but I'm sure you will undertand the features part.

Cheers,

Hein

Mark Lanctot
2006-04-12, 08:50
heinkraanen: I don't want to rain on your parade, but keep in mind these NAS devices are not intended to run complex applications like SlimServer. They are not PCs and are not intended to have 3rd party applications loaded onto them.

They'll fall in 3 categories:

1. Full SlimServer support. QNAP TS-101 and Infrant ReadyNAS. Very rare. Limitations even on these: you have to wait for the manufacturer to upgrade to a new SlimServer version (which contains the Squeezebox firmware), limited plugin availability and restricted (QNAP) or no (Infrant) transcoding.

2. "Hackable" SlimServer support. There's only one "open" NAS where this is manufacturer-supported: the Kurobox. On others, you'll have to install 3rd party firmware to be able to install 3rd party applications. This can be accomplished with varying degrees of difficulty, will almost surely void your warranty and may "brick" your NAS if done improperly (i.e. make it about as functional as a brick.) Examples of hackable NASes: Buffalo Linkstation, Linksys NSLU2. More common than category 1.

3. No third party firmware. You're on your own with these, and manufacturers are unlikely to support you. You can ask, but they will probably say "what the heck is SlimServer?" They may get 20 requests a day for stuff they've never heard of before. The vast majority of NAS devices fall into this category. Some of these devices may not even run Linux but might run something proprietary like VxWorks, in which case you're completely stuffed.

While SlimServer can actually run on some pretty low-powered hardware, it's complicated and needs Perl support. Installing it on just any embedded application like a NAS box is not a trivial undertaking - remember, the manufacturers don't want you messing around in there. Again, these are not PCs and don't use conventional PC hardware and technology - the OS isn't running off a hard disk but off flash memory, there's no keyboard or monitor interface, the processor isn't very powerful, etc. All this makes modifying them hard, a lot harder than a PC.

I don't mean to run this idea down, but you'll probably receive a generic "we don't support 3rd party applications" from Freecom, which is the standard response they give to the 10 SlimServer requests per week, the 20 MythTV requests they get per week, the 40 iTunes requests they get per week and the 2 "Billy Bob's super-duper Linux app" requests they get per week.

You'd be much better off building a low-powered, fanless PC out of a VIA mini-ITX fanless motherboard. Or at the very least, go with something that's been done before: Linksys NSLU2, Buffalo Linkstation, QNAP, Infrant.

I don't want to sound mean, but unless you go with a device that has 3rd party firmware available or supports SlimServer right out of the box you're wasting time. There are lots of NAS boxes out there right now, they're becoming quite popular, and you'll easily find hundreds more if you look. But only a very few can run SlimServer.

Again, I don't want to offend you but I think you're spinning your wheels here. A Google search for "networked attached storage" turns up 50 600 000 hits. I bet 500-1000 of those are for NAS boxes.

heinkraanen
2006-04-12, 08:56
Thanks very much for your extended reply. Very useful. I have also already contacted the company, and they said aproximately what you said. I think I will stop my quest, have a look on the Kurobox, and I might end up keep on running slimserver on my normal PC/Laptop. I don't wanna buy just another PC. I will still buy a NAS server, to sore all my files on, and using the other possibilities, such as the backing-up, mail server, webserver etc.

Regards,

Hein

Mark Lanctot
2006-04-12, 10:22
Thanks very much for your extended reply. Very useful. I have also already contacted the company, and they said aproximately what you said. I think I will stop my quest, have a look on the Kurobox, and I might end up keep on running slimserver on my normal PC/Laptop. I don't wanna buy just another PC. I will still buy a NAS server, to sore all my files on, and using the other possibilities, such as the backing-up, mail server, webserver etc.

Regards,

Hein

Glad you weren't offended. If you're looking at running SlimServer on a normal PC/laptop as you indicate, then all you need is a hard drive to store your music files. Usually you just add an internal hard drive to store your music files and an external hard drive in a USB 2.0 enclosure to back them up. Unplug the USB 2.0 drive and store it away from your PC for protection.

If you want a mail server/web server/file server you might want to take a look at ClarkConnect (http://www.clarkconnect.com/community/). It's a Linux distribution designed specifically for this purpose and can run on some pretty low-power hardware, but it has to run on a PC. If you go with a fanless VIA board, you'll have something as quiet as any NAS and way more powerful and flexible. Also, and this is the best part, ClarkConnect supports SlimServer! At one time I believe it was a standard module although it could be included in the package now. It can be fairly easily installed if it isn't included - a lot easier than installing SlimServer on a NAS, at any rate.

Also I should mention the Kurobox is just a Buffalo Linkstation with open firmware.

Robin Bowes
2006-04-12, 12:02
nicketynick wrote:
> Hmmmm, good idea.... I'll need a new power supply at least though - the
> thing squeals like a pig until its warmed up, so the fans bearings must
> be in bad shape. So, instead of spending $100 (CAD) on a new power
> supply, maybe I should direct those $$ towards a slug, if it can be
> just as easily set up to run SlimServer, and dead quiet at that.
> Anybody have any thoughts one way or the other?

Just replace the fan - costs much less than replacing the whole PSU.

R.

James10
2006-04-12, 12:09
Hello,

Is it possible to add MusicMagic to a Qnap with SS or could I only use MM with the QNap via my PC?

I'm a noob so go easy ;-)

Thanks.

nicketynick
2006-04-12, 12:28
nicketynick wrote:
> Hmmmm, good idea.... I'll need a new power supply at least though - the
> thing squeals like a pig until its warmed up, so the fans bearings must
> be in bad shape. So, instead of spending $100 (CAD) on a new power
> supply, maybe I should direct those $$ towards a slug, if it can be
> just as easily set up to run SlimServer, and dead quiet at that.
> Anybody have any thoughts one way or the other?

Just replace the fan - costs much less than replacing the whole PSU.

R.


PSU fans aren't designed as LRU's (Line Replaceable Units), are they? So what's the best method? Soldering required? Aren't there some big capacitors in there that can give you a nasty shock? Pretty sure if I ask at the computer shop, they'll just tell me I have to have a new PSU!
Thanks for idea.

poyntzj
2006-04-14, 06:19
Back to the first issue, I have an old EPIA Eden machine running as my slimserver, and as I listen to the BBC I use Alien BBC so have to stay down this route. The machine is quiet and lower power.
It itself connects to a Bufflo Terastation which is fine, but the slimserver software would not do a thing with it where as the MP3s share was connected as my M: drive and via Media Player or WinAmp plays my MP3's fine. sheesh, even the TwonkyServer I was using for the Netgear MP101 was working fine.
I tried the workgroups, user ID's and everything else.
In the end I looked at the services again mainly to check that the Windows Firewall was disabled - it was. I saw that the SSDP discovery service was disabled and thought, nothing to loose I'll restart it. Voilia, all working and the slimserver is now working via a UNC address too.

To be honest, with lots of the small NAS devices, a 200Mhz or greater PPC or MIPS processor can easily do these tasks. RISC processors can run at far lower speeds and CISC processors. Sheesh, Look how long it took the PPC range to get to GHz speeds after the Intel/AMD race. The late G4 processors in Macs easily outperform a high end PIII.
Not sure of the speed of the PPC derivatives in the Xbox, PS3 and GameCube, but they may just about reach 2.3Ghz, no more which is way down on the x86 speeds which they have moved away from.

Robin Bowes
2006-05-08, 04:21
nicketynick wrote:
> Robin Bowes Wrote:
>> nicketynick wrote:
>>> Hmmmm, good idea.... I'll need a new power supply at least though -
>> the
>>> thing squeals like a pig until its warmed up, so the fans bearings
>> must
>>> be in bad shape. So, instead of spending $100 (CAD) on a new power
>>> supply, maybe I should direct those $$ towards a slug, if it can be
>>> just as easily set up to run SlimServer, and dead quiet at that.
>>> Anybody have any thoughts one way or the other?
>> Just replace the fan - costs much less than replacing the whole PSU.
>>
>> R.
>
>
> PSU fans aren't designed as LRU's (Line Replaceable Units), are they?
> So what's the best method? Soldering required? Aren't there some big
> capacitors in there that can give you a nasty shock? Pretty sure if I
> ask at the computer shop, they'll just tell me I have to have a new
> PSU!
> Thanks for idea.

Sorry for the late reply - the volume in this forum/list is getting
silly! (A good sign for Slim Devices, I'm sure)

In my experience (I've replaced one PSU fan) it was a standard sized
unit that was soldered onto the PSU circuit board. So, soldering may be
required. Of course, if you're not comfortable with a soldering iron
then a new PSU would be your best option.

R.

nicketynick
2006-05-08, 12:14
Glad you brought me back to this thread - I had forgotten about Gildahl's inspirational post. Hope Gildahl's around, because I have a question:
How did you handle the 200GB drive? My understanding is that Linux can't write to NTFS formatted drives, and the maximum partition size for FAT32 is 137 GB. So did you just create 2 FAT32 partitions, or what?
Off to the hardware store to see if I can find some thin styrofoam!
Nick

richidoo
2006-05-08, 12:44
I have ReadyNAS NV and I find it to work very well with the SB. On the PROs side, It is easy to configure, easy to update, expandable storage, RAID5, transfers data on and off the array EXTREMELY fast. They give excellent service and have an active user forum. 4 drive design allows expansion up to 2.4TB in RAID 5 redundant array. Your data is protected from drive failure by a data redundancy scheme. It is upgradable, and drives are hot swappable. Due to the transfer speed I have seen from it, I would guess it could easily feed several SBs and a network DVD player simultaneously. It is the only NAS solution which actively supports running Slimserver. For me, this was the biggest advantage. I didn't have to trust some geek on the internet to tell me how to hack the product and void my warrantee while drastically reduce my music listening time and reminding me why I left the IT industry.

On the Downsides, slimserver user interface is not as fast on ReadyNAS as on my pentium 4 PC. That has not been a big problem for me, but I am more patient now than I was in my youth. It runs faster if you have your music library well organized and wav files sorted and labelled correctly, and server configured correctly. You must use the official Infrant version of Slimserver with the ReadyNAS OS. This means you must wait until Slim Devices releases an official upgrade before you get ANY of the updates. You cannot use any of the nightly upgrades available for small incremental changes. 6.2.2 is now available on infrant, and this is a very good revision, but undoubtably there will be tweaks that you will not want to wait a few months to get. The ReadyNAS is loud due to the cooling fan. This really doesn't matter as long as you have an ethernet connection somewhere where noise doesn't matter. It is too loud to have it next to your SB for any critical music listening. Much louder than a PC. To get the most value out of it, you need a network in your house, minimum PC + multi-port switch + SB, preferrably router with WAN for internet radio stations. Last, it is expensive compared to USB drives, but most Infrant customers feel that they got their money's worth from Infrant.

Overall, I think it is a good product for serving a very large music collection to a SqueezeBox.
Rich