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george_k
2006-03-28, 21:44
Looking for a piece of software that can program that I can schedule to take backups of music stored on my pc to an external HD.

Preferably it would be nice if can determine what new files have been recently from the last backup added and copy over only those new files.

Any suggestions?

kdf
2006-03-28, 21:50
search for the forum topic "how do YOU backup your music"
-k

Mark Lanctot
2006-03-28, 21:54
Long discussion here:

http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=22161

Executive summary: robocopy [source] [destination] /MIR

Pale Blue Ego
2006-03-28, 21:56
xxcopy source:\ target:\ /clone /yy

does it for me

trebejo
2006-03-30, 00:57
Please don't resent this unix-only solution, perhaps you might be interested (e.g. with a linux dual-boot setup where linux is used solely for system maintenance and debugging).

Instead of simply re-writing the entire directory branch everytime I need to make a full back up, I only delete the obsolete files and update or copy the new ones by typing a single line in a terminal:

$ rsync -av --delete /original/ /backup/

where "/original/" stands for the directory that has all the music files and "/backup/" stands for the place where it's being backed up.

This rsync tool is pretty cool all-around, but in the context of large filesystems with relatively small changes, it's a godsend. Cloning a 300gb hard drive takes me about 5-6 hours, but that little command up there executes in a few minutes quietly in the background while I do whatever.

Caveat emptor--this is a pretty sharp little blade. You can wipe out your backup if you make a mistake typing things in there, and if you are distracted enough to switch the places of original and backup, well, then you're going in the wrong direction in a one-way time machine. Come to think of it, Orwell used such a device in "1984".

Cheers,

Ariel

Robin Bowes
2006-03-30, 01:10
trebejo wrote:
>
> Instead of simply re-writing the entire directory branch everytime I
> need to make a full back up, I only delete the obsolete files and
> update or copy the new ones by typing a single line in a terminal:

So, what happens when you realise that you deleted a file just before
you ran rsync that you didn't mean to delete and that you'd really like
to get back?

Sure, rsync is cool, but you're not really making a useful backup using
it like you are.

Have a look at rsnapshot [1] - I think you'll like it.

1. http://www.rsnapshot.org/

R.

bernt
2006-03-30, 01:41
On Windows XP use robocopy and Schedule.

"robocopy D:\path C:\path /MIR" works for me.

trebejo
2006-03-30, 01:45
So, what happens when you realise that you deleted a file just before
you ran rsync that you didn't mean to delete and that you'd really like
to get back?

I yell like a stuck pig, or I look at the other N,000 albums in my collection and cope with it.

Your point is well taken of course. I make a big investment in my alertness at that moment before the "enter" key is pressed (e.g. no scotch before that keystroke).

There is also something to be said about the nature of the filesystem. With scarcely any exceptions, the music files grow monotonically, and deletions are usually the consequence of having moved something around or having re-tagged something.

Hence as far as my music collection is concerned, I'm pretty sure I've made a stable marriage with rsync.

With data of a different nature, my concerns shift, which leads us to...


Sure, rsync is cool, but you're not really making a useful backup using
it like you are.

Have a look at rsnapshot [1] - I think you'll like it.

1. http://www.rsnapshot.org/

R.

Thanks! The multi-user flavor of that (root password need not be involved) makes it pretty suggestive for a multi-user system.

There is a "learning curve--hit the next topic" tension in modernity that sometimes forces me to choose something like rsync rather than the next step up the chain.

Personal on-topic recommendations are the typical stimulant for me to go ahead and make that next step (which is how I replaced a ghastly cp -R whatever command with rsync). And now if your tip bears fruit (it's in an O'Reilly so we're on our way), then my friend shall hear back from *me*.

Unix tennis is a lovely game.

Cheers,

Ariel

fuzzyT
2006-03-30, 10:26
bernt wrote:
> On Windows XP use robocopy and Schedule.
>
> "robocopy D:\path C:\path /MIR" works for me.

Better yet, schedule this:

robocopy D:\srcpath E:\destpath /E /B

This will copy over any new or modified files to your backup but _not_
delete any files/dirs that are in the destpath but not in the srcpath.
This practice protects against a lost/deleted source being automatically
synchronized over to your backup.

And run this only when you are sure of the state of the source files:

robocopy D:\srcpath E:\destpath /MIR

This will delete files/dirs which have been removed from the source,
freeing up space on your backup device.

--rt

street_samurai
2006-03-30, 11:50
As other posters have mentioned in other threads, for Windows, SyncBack is the best backup program I've seen. It works across your LAN, works with Samba... and most importantly of all: it does what it says its going to do.

There is a free version I believe.

I tried several other solutions and none of them worked reliably and as effectively as SyncBack.

ss.