PDA

View Full Version : How much free space do I really need to leave on my HD?



bephillips
2006-02-28, 16:17
Enjoying my new Squeezebox and I'm in the process of organizing almost a TB of music on hard drives, mostly flacs of live music I have downloaded or recorded myself
http://db.etree.org/bephillips
and have started flac-ing my CD collection.

My question is: How much free space do I really need to leave on a HD before performance takes a hit FOR THIS PARTICULAR APPLICATION?

I have heard that in general, one should leave about 20% free space, but as I understand it, this is in a scenario where users are creating and deleting files in the course of using the drive. I, on the other hand, lay down a bunch of data and then mostly only read it. Leaving 60 GB unused on a 300 GB drive seems wasteful if it is not neccessary for this particular application.

Anyone out there with an authoritative knowlege of HD performance issues able to answer this?

Thanks for your help. Want some fresh tunes? Go to http://bigbluetarp.com for pointers to yummy free flacs of live music recorded by my crew and other fun stuff.

radish
2006-02-28, 17:35
None, fill it as tight as you want. Read performance is not affected in the slightest by available space. Personally when speccing drives I leave a chunk available to grow into, as running out before you have a chance to buy a new drive is a PITA, but having the drive at 100% as a steady state is fine.

jonheal
2006-02-28, 18:55
None, fill it as tight as you want. Read performance is not affected in the slightest by available space. Personally when speccing drives I leave a chunk available to grow into, as running out before you have a chance to buy a new drive is a PITA, but having the drive at 100% as a steady state is fine.
What about swap space? Fragmentation?

stinkingpig
2006-02-28, 19:33
>
> radish Wrote:
>> None, fill it as tight as you want. Read performance is not affected in
>> the slightest by available space. Personally when speccing drives I
>> leave a chunk available to grow into, as running out before you have a
>> chance to buy a new drive is a PITA, but having the drive at 100% as a
>> steady state is fine.
> What about swap space?

Only an issue for the main OS drive, presumably this is a music-only volume.

> Fragmentation?

Only an issue for Microsoft filesystems.

--
Jack Coates At Monkeynoodle Dot Org: It's A Scientific Venture!
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin, so across the Western
ocean I must wander" - traditional

radish
2006-02-28, 20:31
Only an issue for Microsoft filesystems.


Correction: only an issue for certain filesystems, and even then only when they are heavily written/rewritten. Not the case the OP described.

stinkingpig
2006-02-28, 21:23
>
>>
>> Only an issue for Microsoft filesystems.
>>
>
> Correction: only an issue for certain filesystems, and even then only
> when they are heavily written/rewritten. Not the case the OP described.
>

Isn't NTFS their latest and greatest? Certainly gets badly fragged in my
experience. Anyway, I certainly agree with the spirit of your comment and
should have said similar, which is that you gotta use the filesystem in
order to produce fragmentation. A read-only store won't have the problem.

--
Jack Coates At Monkeynoodle Dot Org: It's A Scientific Venture!
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin, so across the Western
ocean I must wander" - traditional

jonheal
2006-03-01, 06:32
A read-only drive implies that the user will never again add any new music. Who does that apply to?

jimdibb
2006-03-01, 07:09
It applies to any hard drive that's full. Or, the better description is a
WORM hard drive. Write once, read many. You can fill that type of device
right to the top.

On 3/1/06, jonheal <jonheal.23zu5b1141221002 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>
wrote:
>
>
> A read-only drive implies that the user will never again add any new
> music. Who does that apply to?
>
>
> --
> jonheal
>
> Jon Heal says:
> Have a nice day!
> http://www.theheals.org/
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> jonheal's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=2133
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=21598
>
>

jonheal
2006-03-01, 07:22
It applies to any hard drive that's full. Or, the better description is a
WORM hard drive. Write once, read many. You can fill that type of device
right to the top.

On 3/1/06, jonheal <jonheal.23zu5b1141221002 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>
wrote:
>
>
> A read-only drive implies that the user will never again add any new
> music. Who does that apply to?
>
>
> --
> jonheal
>
> Jon Heal says:
> Have a nice day!
> http://www.theheals.org/
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> jonheal's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=2133
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=21598
>
>
My point is that considering your music drive read-only is tantamount to saying that you aren't going to be adding any more music -- ever. Unless you have a mechanism in place that adds your new music to a second drive (that also contains all of you previous music), and then overwrites your music drive in its entirety.

radish
2006-03-01, 07:38
My point is that considering your music drive read-only is tantamount to saying that you aren't going to be adding any more music -- ever. Unless you have a mechanism in place that adds your new music to a second drive (that also contains all of you previous music), and then overwrites your music drive in its entirety.

I have my music over 3 drives. The first 2 are full, so I'm adding to the third. When that's full, I'll add another, and so on. Fragmentation is not an issue in this situation.

To be honest, even if I were adding and removing all the time I'd still not consider fragmentation an issue due to the size of these files (large) and the performance requirements of the application (low).

tyler_durden
2006-03-01, 15:36
I fill it up, but before you get it to more than about 80% full, defrag it as many times as it takes to get to zero fragments. Then as you add the remaining files, defrag often to keep fragmentation to zero. Once the drive is full, it essentially becomes a read-only drive and you don't have to do any more defragmentation.

TD