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MattH
2006-02-15, 03:53
I received my SB3 yesterday, after setting it up I noticed that the bottom right part of the front silver screen was loose.

Looking at the bottom right hand side, the silver front panel is pushed over the white bevel creating a 2 - 3mm gap between the dark and siver screen components.

I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality and/or quality assurance.

MattH

mherger
2006-02-15, 04:13
> I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that
> something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality
> and/or quality assurance.

I think there was a quality problem in one of the first batches - it's not
an issue with all boxes. There was some talk about it in the forums.

--

Michael

-----------------------------------------------------------
Help translate SlimServer by using the
SlimString Translation Helper (http://www.herger.net/slim/)

Richie
2006-02-15, 05:47
> I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that
> something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality
> and/or quality assurance.

I bought three of mine in the UK too but I found it easier to contact
slim support. Just over a week later I had 3 replacement panels arrive
direct from the US and now they look perfect. I guess your supplier
has had some slow moving stock.

I can't fault the service from Slim, they acknowledged the problem
(which a lot of companies don't) and quickly supplied the replacement
parts.

Richard

Millwood
2006-02-15, 06:30
I just got two from Slim and both seem perfect.

Robster
2006-02-15, 16:25
I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality and/or quality assurance.

MattH[/QUOTE]


Expensive? you are joking right?.......for what it does it's a stone cold bargain.

Rob

jmpage2
2006-02-15, 16:33
I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality and/or quality assurance.

MattH


Expensive? you are joking right?.......for what it does it's a stone cold bargain.

Rob[/QUOTE]

"stone cold bargain" is something of a relative term. The SB3 effectively does nothing more than what a Roku you can pick up for $149 does.

The primary things that justify the increased price of the Slim box are the updated display and the "audiophile" quality electronics. For some folks the native FLAC support seals the deal.

Remember, cost is relative. For something like the SB to really take off for the masses it would have to be a heckuva lot less than $300. For not much more than $300 you can get an actual PC running Linux.

radish
2006-02-15, 16:52
For not much more than $300 you can get an actual PC running Linux.

Well, yes, and you could also get 400 candy bars or 20 CDs - but I fail to see the comparison. If I wanted a PC running Linux that's what I would have bought...

jmpage2
2006-02-15, 17:52
Well, yes, and you could also get 400 candy bars or 20 CDs - but I fail to see the comparison. If I wanted a PC running Linux that's what I would have bought...

The point is that the Slim box fits into the general computing category. How many network appliances fetch $300 (answer, not too many). Whether it is "expensive" or a "bargain" is obviously in the eye of the individual consumer. Personally I think that the Squeezebox is starting to creep out of the audiophile/tweaker closet and get closer to being something that the masses will embrace (although it will require much dumbing down of software and installation for that to happen).

When that DOES happen more and more people will put the Squeezebox up against products that cost 1/2 the price for the same basic functionality (Roku, airport express, etc)... and it really won't matter to them if the SB has a better DAC or extra outputs or a slightly better display.

Personally I think that Slim should go the Roku route. Offer a very budget conscious $149 Squeezebos "lite" that offers basic capabilities at a fantastic pricepoint. Then price a souped up version with a bigger display, higher quality DAC, etc, for $100 more. A deluxe version could even do full multimedia have an HDMI output, etc.

I think that Sean and company have done quite well catering to the geeks, tweakers and audio nuts, but at some point to keep selling equipment they will have to cater to joe 6 pack.

Michaelwagner
2006-02-15, 18:41
I think the quote we're looking for is:

No one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people

http://www.quotedb.com/quotes/2199

I guess it's up to Sean & Dean (gee, a California beach band) if they want to go that way or not.

MrC
2006-02-15, 19:29
I think the quote we're looking for is:


http://www.quotedb.com/quotes/2199

Mencken did have a sharp tongue! I think the quote was:


No one in this world, so far as I know ... has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people.

Of course, in 1926, Mencken had not yet seen the rise and fall of Nazi Germany nor the fall of the Soviet Union. I suppose the dumb American's weren't so dumb afterall.

jmpage2
2006-02-15, 19:40
I think the quote we're looking for is:


http://www.quotedb.com/quotes/2199

I guess it's up to Sean & Dean (gee, a California beach band) if they want to go that way or not.

How you extract that by selling to the masses Slim Devices is somehow selling to "stupid americans" is beyond belief. I find it amusing that so many people want Slim's products to remain their own little treasured geek box that the world at large doesn't know about.

I remember when people that owned the iPod were considered elitest because many people couldn't figure out how to load tunes onto it (early iPods only had firewire interface)... Apple went with the standard USB interface, made iTunes easier and easier to use and now they have a massive success on their hands. I fail to see why Slim would want to do any different.

MattH
2006-02-16, 05:46
Expensive? you are joking right?.......for what it does it's a stone cold bargain.

Rob

UK price is 220 which is approx $380. I personally think this is expensive, compared to the Soundbridge, but agree that it(Squeezebox) is the superior product.

I am just disappointed that manufactoring defects we not picked.

Maybe I was just unlucky...

jonheal
2006-02-16, 06:15
The point is that the Slim box fits into the general computing category. How many network appliances fetch $300 (answer, not too many). Whether it is "expensive" or a "bargain" is obviously in the eye of the individual consumer. Personally I think that the Squeezebox is starting to creep out of the audiophile/tweaker closet and get closer to being something that the masses will embrace (although it will require much dumbing down of software and installation for that to happen).

When that DOES happen more and more people will put the Squeezebox up against products that cost 1/2 the price for the same basic functionality (Roku, airport express, etc)... and it really won't matter to them if the SB has a better DAC or extra outputs or a slightly better display.

Personally I think that Slim should go the Roku route. Offer a very budget conscious $149 Squeezebos "lite" that offers basic capabilities at a fantastic pricepoint. Then price a souped up version with a bigger display, higher quality DAC, etc, for $100 more. A deluxe version could even do full multimedia have an HDMI output, etc.

I think that Sean and company have done quite well catering to the geeks, tweakers and audio nuts, but at some point to keep selling equipment they will have to cater to joe 6 pack.
I see nothing wrong with catering to a niche market if that's what Slim wants to do. They don't have to be all things to all people. It has to "maintain," but a business doesn't have to "grow" to survive. As long as their balance sheet stays black, that's all that matters unless they have other aspirations. There will always be new "geeks, tweakers and audio nuts" entering the market.

Ben Sandee
2006-02-16, 06:48
On 2/16/06, MattH <MattH.23bopb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
>
> I am just disappointed that manufactoring defects we not picked.
>
> Maybe I was just unlucky...
>

You were unlucky. I hope you took the time to ask SlimDevices to fix the
problem -- which we all know they will, promptly.

Ben

Fifer
2006-02-16, 06:52
The point is that the Slim box fits into the general computing category.
In whose opinion?

I think that Sean and company have done quite well catering to the geeks, tweakers and audio nuts, but at some point to keep selling equipment they will have to cater to joe 6 pack.
Many companies have made an excellent and profitable business out of catering to niches such as 'geeks, tweekers and audio nuts' (think Naim, Linn, Meridian, etc). It's fairly basic economic theory that niche markets are often far more profitable, higher-margin, less-competitive sectors than the mass market and attract a customer base with higher than average disposable income/discretionary expenditure funding who tend to be brand loyal in their field of interest.

Slim Devices might want to become more mass-market, but it's by no means an imperative.

PAUL WILLIAMSON
2006-02-16, 07:06
>>> jmpage2.23as2b (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com 02/15/06 7:52 PM >>>

radish Wrote:
> Well, yes, and you could also get 400 candy bars or 20 CDs - but I
fail
> to see the comparison. If I wanted a PC running Linux that's what I
> would have bought...

<snip all the non-funny stuff>

> I think that Sean and company have done quite well catering to
> the geeks, tweakers and audio nuts, but at some point to keep
> selling equipment they will have to cater to joe 6 pack.

Who the hell is this guy "Joe 6-Pack" I keep hearing about?
And why is he concerned about audio quality while he's drunk?

I doubt most Joe 6-Pack's give 2 hoots about audio quality, and
even less about a computer. Unless a squeezebox can be used
to play audio porn, slimserver/squeezebox combo will never be
part of the hi-fi setup of Joe 6-Pack.

Paul

Michaelwagner
2006-02-16, 07:23
How you extract that by selling to the masses Slim Devices is somehow selling to "stupid americans" is beyond belief.

From this line:


it will require much dumbing down of software and installation for that to happen

And, you misunderstood my point.

I'm not against "dumbing down" the software (although I hate that expression with a passion, because it's pejorative, and I don't think making software foolproof is a bad thing). I think, in fact, that it will be a necessary step along the way to larger acceptance.

Michaelwagner
2006-02-16, 07:26
Slim Devices might want to become more mass-market, but it's by no means an imperative.
Thank you. This says, more eloquently than I can on the first cup of coffee of the morning, what I wanted to say.

They may chose to become more mass market, but it's not clear that they want to (nor is it clear that they should).

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 09:48
>>>
Who the hell is this guy "Joe 6-Pack" I keep hearing about?
And why is he concerned about audio quality while he's drunk?

I doubt most Joe 6-Pack's give 2 hoots about audio quality, and
even less about a computer. Unless a squeezebox can be used
to play audio porn, slimserver/squeezebox combo will never be
part of the hi-fi setup of Joe 6-Pack.

Paul

You'd probably be rather astounded then by the number of "normal Joes" who have marvelled at my Squeezebox setup only to be intimidated by what it takes to get the whole thing set up and working.

Not everyone who has a real job (welding, construction, telecom, pretty much any job where you might actually break a sweat) and has a beer or two is a drunken porn loving slobbish moron.

But it's good to see you wear your prejudices on your sleeve.

snarlydwarf
2006-02-16, 10:23
a drunken porn loving slobbish moron.

And some of us drunken porn loving slobbish morons enjoy great music, too.

CardinalFang
2006-02-16, 10:32
You'd probably be rather astounded then by the number of "normal Joes" who have marvelled at my Squeezebox setup only to be intimidated by what it takes to get the whole thing set up and working.

I was explaining my SB setup to someone I work with who loves music and has tons of CDs. She wanted to get one when she saw how good looking it was and when I told hert how much I liked it. Her comment was "my son-in-law will have to set this up for me if it involves installing software and setting up network connections". Do not underestimate how intimidating anything other than plugging something into the mains and pressing the on switch is to the intelligent but non-technical person.

The Squeezebox to me is in a limbo state - it has mass market pretensions from its industrial design, it isn't a standard HiFi component shape for example and uses wall-wart type power supplies rather than the overkill electronics favoured by audiophiles. Yet it requires an element of devotion by technically minded people to get it running well. It isn't plug and play, but it looks like it should be. You still need to know what you are doing for a successful install, especially on wireless.

Yes - I know that many people have installed SlimServer, plugged in the Squeezebox and got music, but many haven't and in any case there are lot of people out there who love music but run away at the thought of entering a network IP address. "What if I break my home network? What if I do something wrong and plug it into the wrong slot on the router or PC?"

Paul

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 10:32
And some of us drunken porn loving slobbish morons enjoy great music, too.

Ya! :)

......................

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 10:36
I was explaining my SB setup to someone I work with who loves music and has tons of CDs. She wanted to get one when she saw how good looking it was and when I told hert how much I liked it. Her comment was "my son-in-law will have to set this up for me if it involves installing software and setting up network connections". Do not underestimate how intimidating anything other than plugging something into the mains and pressing the on switch is to the intelligent but non-technical person.

The Squeezebox to me is in a limbo state - it has mass market pretensions from its industrial design, it isn't a standard HiFi component shape for example and uses wall-wart type power supplies rather than the overkill electronics favoured by audiophiles. Yet it requires an element of devotion by technically minded people to get it running well. It isn't plug and play, but it looks like it should be. You still need to know what you are doing for a successful install, especially on wireless.

Yes - I know that many people have installed SlimServer, plugged in the Squeezebox and got music, but many haven't and in any case there are lot of people out there who love music but run away at the thought of entering a network IP address. "What if I break my home network? What if I do something wrong and plug it into the wrong slot on the router or PC?"

Paul

Couldn't agree more. The vast majority of Slimserver downloads are for Windows and we all know how easy it is to get a service like this to run smoothly on windows (firewalls, virus scanners, background processes anyone?).

Some of this is beyond Slim Devices control but certainly there ARE things that can be done with the application and installation instructions to make it easy for non-techies to get things going.

As far as people being "morons" I find that many tech folk automatically slot people into that category who don't live and breathe tech as they do.

I sure know a lot of PHD and MD "morons" if "tech savvy" is really the benchmark for smarts nowadays.

kdf
2006-02-16, 10:43
Quoting CardinalFang <CardinalFang.23c1wb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>:

> I was explaining my SB setup to someone I work with who loves music and
> has tons of CDs. She wanted to get one when she saw how good looking it
> was and when I told hert how much I liked it. Her comment was "my
> son-in-law will have to set this up for me if it involves installing
> software and setting up network connections".

Must be nice to not have to hook up someone else's tv, sattelite dish,
surround sound or program the VCR becuase they are too intimidated.
None of this is new, and certainly didn't stop such equipment from
becoming mainstream. Or, am I misunderstanding the meaning of
mainstream?
-k

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 11:50
Quoting CardinalFang <CardinalFang.23c1wb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>:

> I was explaining my SB setup to someone I work with who loves music and
> has tons of CDs. She wanted to get one when she saw how good looking it
> was and when I told hert how much I liked it. Her comment was "my
> son-in-law will have to set this up for me if it involves installing
> software and setting up network connections".

Must be nice to not have to hook up someone else's tv, sattelite dish,
surround sound or program the VCR becuase they are too intimidated.
None of this is new, and certainly didn't stop such equipment from
becoming mainstream. Or, am I misunderstanding the meaning of
mainstream?
-k

You would be amazed at how many "smart people" use installation services to come out and hook their hi-fi and video gear up for them.

I've met some brilliant people (surgeons, etc) who are absolutely baffled when it comes to technology.

It's of course improbable to make the Squeezebox and Slimserver "idiot proof" but certainly it can be further simplified to make it easier for non-techies to set it up successfully. To start with Slim really should build a native Windows API to control the server and players for the techno-illiterati of the world who find configuration via web browser far too confusing.

CardinalFang
2006-02-16, 12:51
Must be nice to not have to hook up someone else's tv, sattelite dish, surround sound or program the VCR becuase they are too intimidated. None of this is new, and certainly didn't stop such equipment from becoming mainstream. Or, am I misunderstanding the meaning of mainstream?
-k

The same people typically get the person who sold it to set it up for them, which obviously isn't possible for the SB. My mother bought a TV the other month from a department store - they came, unpacked it, set up the channels and left. People expect that kind of service with electronics if they are non-technical. It's part of the deal when buying from a high street store - they'll fit it for you if you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself. The SB is even more scary, you have to install software on a PC and then configure it. Definitely a job for the experts in most people's minds - after all isn't that the sensible option for PCs? To do otherwise is to risk losing data. You have to put yourself in the mindset of the average person who isn't a technophobe but equally isn't a technical expert. Now, I would never ask for that service because I do know how to put things together, but I can guarantee you that most people I know outside of my R&D team would get the store to install non-trivial technology.

As an anology, consider getting new brake discs fitted to my car, which I have just had done at huge expense. Could I do it? Probably, after all I doubt the average mechanic is any smarter than I am, but I'm not experienced and I don't want to risk screwing up my car.

It's very easy to take the attitude that people are just too (a)dumb or (b)lazy to work stuff out, but if you actually want to run a successful consumer products business you have to take into account that people in general don't like wiring up electronic equipment. It's electrical and therefore carries the potential to break or harm if incorrectly installed.

Paul

Fifer
2006-02-16, 14:29
but if you actually want to run a successful consumer products business you have to take into account that people in general don't like wiring up electronic equipment.
Again, if you want to run a successful mass market consumer products business, that might have an element of truth in it but you can run a highly profitable business catering to tech-savvy audiophiles without giving a second thought to such concerns. It all depends on the business model you choose to adopt.

There's a very common misconception that the only way to be successful in business is to cater for the mass market. In some sectors, that would be the worst way to go and would be akin to committing commercial suicide.

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 14:39
Again, if you want to run a successful mass market consumer products business, that might have an element of truth in it but you can run a highly profitable business catering to tech-savvy audiophiles without giving a second thought to such concerns. It all depends on the business model you choose to adopt.

There's a very common misconception that the only way to be successful in business is to cater for the mass market. In some sectors, that would be the worst way to go and would be akin to committing commercial suicide.

I think it's more of an assumption than anything that Sean & Co. have opted for the "audiophile niche market". I repeatedly see people assert this but I haven't seen anything from the Slim folks that confirms or denies it.

Fifer
2006-02-16, 16:44
I was very careful not to say they had. No assumption on my part.

CardinalFang
2006-02-16, 16:47
I think it's more of an assumption than anything that Sean & Co. have opted for the "audiophile niche market". I repeatedly see people assert this but I haven't seen anything from the Slim folks that confirms or denies it.
Quite. It happens to be well designed and sound good at its price point, but is it an audiophile product or one that happens to be good enough to be acceptable as one? As I said before, I would have expected different design decisions to have been taken for a true audiophile product.

Still, as has been pointed out, we're all second guessing here and I'm sure the Slim team don't want to narrow down their market just yet.

radish
2006-02-16, 17:47
When I look at SlimDevices I see a small but thriving company which has been around longer than (or simply outlived) pretty much all it's competitors, and that is continuing to bring out new innovative products which have built them a healthy (and at times rabid) fan base. That's far more than most new companies ever manage, and far more than most of us have probably achieved.

All I see is success - perhaps, just perhaps, they know what they're doing?

Wirrunna
2006-02-16, 17:59
Down under in Oztralia, the high end audio retailers have a thriving installation business for home theatre, home automation etc. As Cardinal Fang said -"The same people typically get the person who sold it to set it up for them" applies here to high end audio.
Perhaps we will see Slim Devices sold by "Authorised dealer / installers" in the future, especially after the recent write ups.
In Oz, existing stock of Squeezeboxs was sold out within a week of the review on the Silent PC Review web site.

snarlydwarf
2006-02-16, 18:00
I agree, Radish.

I don't know if 'network audio players' will ever be 'mainstream' as ipods: most people really don't listen to that much music at home.

Thanks to the old Sony Walkman, people are used to listening to music while exercising or just 'getting around'. Thanks to car stereos they're used to it while driving... but most people I know don't really listen to music at home.

(Which is sort of sad: since you can't really -listen- on a car stereo or even a walkman/ipod type device...)

Radio stations have known this for ages: it's why "Drive Time" is the big money time for radio.

A $30 DVD/CD player will satisfy most people at home.

But for the people who really enjoy -listening- to music, the Squeezebox is a great toy. Um, I mean tool. :)

jmpage2
2006-02-16, 18:17
I agree, Radish.

I don't know if 'network audio players' will ever be 'mainstream' as ipods: most people really don't listen to that much music at home.

Thanks to the old Sony Walkman, people are used to listening to music while exercising or just 'getting around'. Thanks to car stereos they're used to it while driving... but most people I know don't really listen to music at home.

(Which is sort of sad: since you can't really -listen- on a car stereo or even a walkman/ipod type device...)

Radio stations have known this for ages: it's why "Drive Time" is the big money time for radio.

A $30 DVD/CD player will satisfy most people at home.

But for the people who really enjoy -listening- to music, the Squeezebox is a great toy. Um, I mean tool. :)

Interesting.

Most people I know have hundreds (if not thousands) of CDs and at least decent stereos. They listen to music all the time. I would love to see a Squeezebox in all of their homes but it has to be a bit easier to set up for the novice first.

I think about how cool the awesome last.fm plugin is and how hard it was to get the thing going and wonder if I know many people who could do it without some help.

snarlydwarf
2006-02-16, 18:26
Perhaps the people you know aren't.. well.. normal. :)

Look at the junk that's circulating on p2p networks.. "oh, yeah, 128k mp3! this will sound great!" (I may not be a total audiophile, but I can still spot a 128k mp3 even on cruddy pc speakers...)

(I used to think RIAA should just not care about 128k rips: anyone who really enjoyed the album would just see it as a way to sample before buying. "Free Marketing!" Then i realized how many people are quite content with horrible sound...)

PAUL WILLIAMSON
2006-02-17, 05:51
>>> jmpage2.23bztb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com 02/16/06 11:48 AM >>>
>
> PAUL WILLIAMSON Wrote:
> > >>>
> > Who the hell is this guy "Joe 6-Pack" I keep hearing about?
> > And why is he concerned about audio quality while he's drunk?
> >
> > I doubt most Joe 6-Pack's give 2 hoots about audio quality, and
> > even less about a computer. Unless a squeezebox can be used
> > to play audio porn, slimserver/squeezebox combo will never be
> > part of the hi-fi setup of Joe 6-Pack.
> >
> > Paul
>
> You'd probably be rather astounded then by the number of "normal
> Joes" who have marvelled at my Squeezebox setup only to be
> intimidated by what it takes to get the whole thing set up and
> working.

Probably not, since my dad is what I would consider a "normal Joe"
who bought a computer specifically to use my slimp3. Doesn't know
crap about computers, and he's lucky that he even knows how to turn
one on.

> Not everyone who has a real job (welding, construction,
> telecom, pretty much any job where you might actually break a
> sweat) and has a beer or two is a drunken porn loving slobbish
> moron.
>
> But it's good to see you wear your prejudices on your sleeve.

Funny, I don't recall saying "drunks" in my assessment, nor do I recall

including any specific type of worker (amusing you include "telecom"
in with welders as the same type of people) when I described the
stuff I was thinking about.

So it's equally nice to see you wearing your prejudices on your sleve
as well. I seem to recall teachers and priests as one of the highest
convicted users of said specific activity.

Either way, I'm sure Dan's efforts of a wizard for setting up
slimserver
will certainly help Slim Devices break into a market where they already

have a very good presence.

--
jmpage2
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PAUL WILLIAMSON
2006-02-17, 06:07
>>> jmpage2.23cnfb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com 02/16/06 8:17 PM >>>
snarlydwarf Wrote:
>Interesting.
>
> Most people I know have hundreds (if not thousands) of CDs and at
> least decent stereos. They listen to music all the time. I would
love
> to see a Squeezebox in all of their homes but it has to be a bit
easier
> to set up for the novice first.

I agree with you totally, but most of these people still shutdown and
power up their computer when they need to use it. They think that
having the computer off for the time when they aren't using it will
save lots of money. Over a year, it might save them $120. I guess
that's good enough for them, but I've tried to tell them startup of
the computer was hard on it, just like starting up a car. Get over
that hump first, and there's a chance.

> I think about how cool the awesome last.fm plugin is and how
> hard it was to get the thing going and wonder if I know many
> people who could do it without some help.

I can't understand why people think plugging in a stereo to
some speakers is so hard. Trying to get some plugin installed that's
not officially supported by slim, while not challenging, is sort of
intimidating. I guess they just do, and it's our jobs to help slim
make the install easier and sell more units!

Paul

hdarwen
2006-02-17, 07:00
OK ... this is going to be a hard one to pin down I think. But any
help/advice appreciated.

I have recently started using the multiple items in tags feature with a
semicolon (";") delimitor. In a few istances this is in the artist field,
and that appears to be working well.

In my genre field however, complete chaos seems to have broken out :). I
can't see any pattern to the behaviour, though it is consistent in that
specific files are similarly tagged after any rescan. It's just the genre
tags are not what I am expecting. I get the following types of behaviour:

- Some files are genre tagged correctly (both with single and multiple tags)
- Some specify no genre at all (even in cases where there is only one value
and no delimiter)
- Others specify just one of the multiple values in the file

Like I said, the bahaviour is consistent in that a specific file will
display the same characteristic (i.e. one of the above) after a rescan.

Some observations:

- In certain cases I have gone completely over the top and have 4 or 5
values in the genre field (separated by semicolons). Maybe there is some
limit I am not aware of???
- One of the genre values is "12'" so I can easily access all 12' singles i
have ripped. Not sure if the ' character could be causing an issue, i.e.
only letters an numbers supported???
- This one is really odd, but when I am rescanning to build the database,
the genres seem to be coming up correctly. I can only explain this with an
example: Several files have "Tech House" as a value. Typically, the actuall
field value would be "House;Tech House;12'". Now, during the actual process
of scanning, if I select "Tech House" from within "Browse Genres" it shows
me an increasing number of files and everything looks OK. But once scanning
is complete, if I select "Tech House", I get just a single song ... the same
one each time. I have looked at the tags with my tag editor and they all
seem fine (but there are a lot of files).

Am running a recent 6.2.2 nightly on windows, but have been having the same
behaviour for some time.

If anyone has any suggestions, even just suggestions of how I migh be able
to troubleshoot, it would be appreciated.

Many thx.

Erm ... sorry for the long post.

Howard.

Michaelwagner
2006-02-17, 07:36
For historical reasons, a bare number in the genre field is interpretated as a short cut for one of a short list of "standard" genres.

It isn't clear what semi-colon support (a non-standard Slim thing) has done to this support.

You may be tripping over this "feature".

In this old standard, 12 was "Other". Getting any "Other"s where you weren't expecting it?

stinkingpig
2006-02-17, 22:06
....
> I think it's more of an assumption than anything that Sean & Co. have
> opted for the "audiophile niche market". I repeatedly see people
> assert this but I haven't seen anything from the Slim folks that
> confirms or denies it.
>

I'm guessing that's because they wisely see these discussions as a waste
of everyone's time, they don't read them, and they don't comment in them
:)

--
Jack Coates At Monkeynoodle Dot Org: It's A Scientific Venture!
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin, so across the Western
ocean I must wander" - traditional

CardinalFang
2006-02-18, 01:44
I can't understand why people think plugging in a stereo to some speakers is so hard

That reminds of the attempt in Europe to ban 4mm plugs on speaker leads because someone managed to plug them into the mains outlet when setting up their stereo and electrocuted themselves. They're an exact fit in the live terminals for some outlets in some Nordic countries I believe.

fairyliquidizer
2006-02-18, 07:12
I received my SB3 yesterday, after setting it up I noticed that the bottom right part of the front silver screen was loose.

Looking at the bottom right hand side, the silver front panel is pushed over the white bevel creating a 2 - 3mm gap between the dark and siver screen components.

I'm getting back to the UK reseller, but it pretty dissapointing that something this cool (and expensive) is let down by poor build quality and/or quality assurance.

MattH

That is unfortunate mine is flawless. Just bad luck I guess. I bought from Advancedmp3players.co.uk (who are only a local call away from me) and have always had great service from them.

Michaelwagner
2006-02-18, 07:34
The SB3s were only brought out shortly before the end of last year.

I don't work for Slim, but reprising the conversations on this forum at the time:

An improperly formed aluminum faceplate together with an incorrect setting on a torqx automatic screwdriver combined to push the back case against the faceplate, defeating the glue after a period of weeks to months.

The problem was found quickly. Corrective action was both to the faceplate and to the screwdriver.

New faceplates were made within a month and shipped to anyone who had the problem and reported it to support at slimdevices dot com. I got mine I think within a month of the problem report, and that delay was only because they didn't have the new faceplates made yet when I complained.

I don't know how that will work outside of North America, maybe you have to report it to a country-based reseller or something, but it's covered by warrantee, Slim knows about it and have to this point made good on it.

Yes, it's not nice when new products have defects, but if no new products had defects, they wouldn't have warrantees. The important thing is that Slim found and fixed the root cause and replaced the defective face plates.

Oh, quality assurance .... the problem didn't surface immediately because the glue held for weeks, despite being put under unintended pressure ... so an initial QA check wouldn't likely have spotted the problem.

hdarwen
2006-02-19, 06:01
as a (much!) simpler question ... has anybody out there got multiple values
in genres working?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Howard Darwen" <hdarwen (AT) btinternet (DOT) com>
To: "Slim Devices Discussion" <discuss (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com>
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2006 2:00 PM
Subject: [slim] Multiple genres in tags


> OK ... this is going to be a hard one to pin down I think. But any
> help/advice appreciated.
>
> I have recently started using the multiple items in tags feature with a
> semicolon (";") delimitor. In a few istances this is in the artist field,
> and that appears to be working well.
>
> In my genre field however, complete chaos seems to have broken out :). I
> can't see any pattern to the behaviour, though it is consistent in that
> specific files are similarly tagged after any rescan. It's just the genre
> tags are not what I am expecting. I get the following types of behaviour:
>
> - Some files are genre tagged correctly (both with single and multiple
> tags)
> - Some specify no genre at all (even in cases where there is only one
> value and no delimiter)
> - Others specify just one of the multiple values in the file
>
> Like I said, the bahaviour is consistent in that a specific file will
> display the same characteristic (i.e. one of the above) after a rescan.
>
> Some observations:
>
> - In certain cases I have gone completely over the top and have 4 or 5
> values in the genre field (separated by semicolons). Maybe there is some
> limit I am not aware of???
> - One of the genre values is "12'" so I can easily access all 12' singles
> i have ripped. Not sure if the ' character could be causing an issue, i.e.
> only letters an numbers supported???
> - This one is really odd, but when I am rescanning to build the database,
> the genres seem to be coming up correctly. I can only explain this with an
> example: Several files have "Tech House" as a value. Typically, the
> actuall field value would be "House;Tech House;12'". Now, during the
> actual process of scanning, if I select "Tech House" from within "Browse
> Genres" it shows me an increasing number of files and everything looks OK.
> But once scanning is complete, if I select "Tech House", I get just a
> single song ... the same one each time. I have looked at the tags with my
> tag editor and they all seem fine (but there are a lot of files).
>
> Am running a recent 6.2.2 nightly on windows, but have been having the
> same behaviour for some time.
>
> If anyone has any suggestions, even just suggestions of how I migh be able
> to troubleshoot, it would be appreciated.
>
> Many thx.
>
> Erm ... sorry for the long post.
>
> Howard.
>

Richie
2006-02-19, 07:23
> as a (much!) simpler question ... has anybody out there got multiple values
> in genres working?

I use multiple genre tags rather than putting multiple values in one
tag and it seems to work ok.

Richard

Siduhe
2006-02-19, 08:25
as a (much!) simpler question ... has anybody out there got multiple values
in genres working?

Slightly off topic, but yes, absolutely, and using a single tag.

I have Server Settings / Behaviour / Multiple Items In Tags set to ";" and my files are tagged with Tag & Rename as "Latin;Brazil;Samba" or "Latin;Mexico;Carnival". In browse by genre, I have the option of Latin, Mexico or Samba etc to get to the same album or track. I have found that multiple genres aren't recognised if you put a space between the seperator (i.e. "Latin; Samba").

Mixture of Ogg and MP3 files, no FLAC.

HTH

MattH
2006-02-25, 07:06
Hi after a bit of a delay I now have a replacement which is build and working fine :-)