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montechristo
2006-01-13, 11:34
Guys,

A really simple question from someone with zero linux experience

If I choose to run Linux on the mediaserver, can I still use NTFS partitions?

As the Mediaserver will be used for access as a file store for Photos and Videos as well.

thanks,

Mark.

snarlydwarf
2006-01-13, 11:43
Guys,

A really simple question from someone with zero linux experience

If I choose to run Linux on the mediaserver, can I still use NTFS partitions?

As the Mediaserver will be used for access as a file store for Photos and Videos as well.


Well, you -could-, but you wouldn't want to.

It would be better to run a native Linux format (ext3, for example), and then use SAMBA to just 'share' them.

Any filesystem specific stuff is going to be 'lost' or 'emulated' by Samba anyway. (Samba is a program that implements Microsoft's SMB protocol, what is usually called "File and Printer Sharing" on Windows.)

montechristo
2006-01-13, 11:45
aha Samba sounds just the ticket

should the worst happen and I get a system failure (I know its Linux and less likely)could an XP machine read my linux formated disk? to rescue any files?

radish
2006-01-13, 12:14
aha Samba sounds just the ticket

should the worst happen and I get a system failure (I know its Linux and less likely)could an XP machine read my linux formated disk? to rescue any files?

Not if you're using ext3, no. The only FS which is supported fully by both XP and Linux is (AFAIK) FAT16/32. You can however boot with something like a Knoppix live cd to setup a temp Linux environment which would happily read the disks.

snarlydwarf
2006-01-13, 12:53
aha Samba sounds just the ticket

Yes, Samba (or something like it, ie, another implementation of the SMB protocol) is what all those little "Network Attached Storage" boxes run. It makes a Linux (or Free/Open/NetBSD or MacOS or whatever) box appear like a Windows File Server on the network. Very useful if you have to deal with Windows.



should the worst happen and I get a system failure (I know its Linux and less likely)could an XP machine read my linux formated disk? to rescue any files?

No, but you should be backing it up anyway. DVD's aren't that spendy or an external USB drive (attach it to make backups, detach it, power it down and hide it off-premises) is even better.

You're much much more likely to have the bearings on a drive die, or some other catastrophic hardware failure than to have the OS die.. and in that case, the OS won't matter. (Things that go round and round at high speeds do tend to break eventually.)

If you don't want to throw a DVD burner in the linux box, you can use your regular backup program on Windows to do it. I used Nero on a :: wince :: Windows machine to back up my collections to a stack of DVDs a few weeks ago just fine.

bishopdonmiguel
2006-01-13, 13:08
> DVD's aren't that spendy or an external USB drive (attach it to make backups, detach it, power it down and hide it off-premises) is even better.

Something to also consider is ease of backup. As the library grows, swapping DVDs or using an external device can be slow & cumbersome. Perhaps I'm just lazy, but having to do so would crush my motivation to do frequent backups. Using a Ghost bootup CD to create images of NTFS partitions on separate hard disc(s) via a removable tray is quick and easy. Backup up 60 GB of data takes about a half hour.

slimpy
2006-01-13, 15:34
should the worst happen and I get a system failure (I know its Linux and less likely)could an XP machine read my linux formated disk? to rescue any files?
Yes, there is a free ext2/ext3 driver for linux http://www.fs-driver.org
But a good backup is still essential.

-s.

notanatheist
2006-01-13, 21:06
NTFS from linux is read-only unless you want to risk data loss. Ext2/3 support can be obtained for Windows. Using Knoppix to recover only works if you have a FAT32 or Ext2/3 drive to dump to. One advantage to linux is you don't have to worry about a license or any viruses. Most exploits that do exist for Unix/Linux platforms are usually aimed at specific services. Not something a "desktop" user has to worry about. Even if you decided to use that copy of XP you got from a friend you're still putting your system at a risk. And the cost of XP Home would buy you a bigger drive or more RAM.

radish
2006-01-13, 21:48
NTFS from linux is read-only unless you want to risk data loss. Ext2/3 support can be obtained for Windows.

Indeed - as has been pointed out. A useful tool I wasn't aware of.



Using Knoppix to recover only works if you have a FAT32 or Ext2/3 drive to dump to.

Which I'm sure could be arranged - or you could of course throw it over a network or burn it to optical media.



One advantage to linux is you don't have to worry about a license or any viruses. Most exploits that do exist for Unix/Linux platforms are usually aimed at specific services.

Like Samba?


Not something a "desktop" user has to worry about.

Great. This is a network server.


Even if you decided to use that copy of XP you got from a friend you're still putting your system at a risk. And the cost of XP Home would buy you a bigger drive or more RAM.
And that is relevant how? The OP has already said (s)he is using Linux, the question was about filesystems. Please keep your advocacy on point.

snarlydwarf
2006-01-13, 22:31
Great. This is a network server.


Well, behind a $30 router or $50 wireless router, the security of even a wildly open server goes way up. Leaving even open NFS shares doesn't mean much when outsiders can't open a socket.

That said, I will confess to queasiness on this subject: like most things, unless you are willing to invest the time to learn the platform, it may be better to stick with what you know.

(Which is part of why I'll never run anything on Windows.. I don't know it and don't want to... :))

Linux is great for remote-adminning, makes a great server platform since it's so easy to throw out useless 'features' that aren't needed for your application (no getting stuck with pieces of IE everywhere because it's "integrated"), great for adding customizations... incredibly nice for development...

But it does have a steep and unforgiving learning curve.

If you are willing to invest the time and relearn a lot of things, you will be rewarded. If not, you will be punished.

notanatheist
2006-01-13, 23:50
Well, behind a $30 router or $50 wireless router, the security of even a wildly open server goes way up. Leaving even open NFS shares doesn't mean much when outsiders can't open a socket.


Thank you snarly, as the OP pointed out "zero linux experience". Running Samba on a home fileserver behind a router is nothing like running a corporate network with smb, nfs, IIS, apache, php, sql, and so much more.

As a deal, my slimserver is open for people to play my music (in my house or streaming) until whenever I change it. Point your stream or your browser to http://67.171.213.122:9001 and annoy me! ONLY RULE: Play all you want with squeeze3. squeeze2 is my bedroom so don't tweak between 11:30pm and 7:30am PST.

I believe all my comments were beneficial and on topic. Thanks.

fathom39
2006-01-14, 06:46
As a deal, my slimserver is open for people to play my music (in my house or streaming) until whenever I change it. Point your stream or your browser to http://67.171.213.122:9001 and annoy me!

Hey notanatheist,
I like your handle and your collection! A lot of familiar stuff there and others I'd like to have. Too bad you're missing "Hymns and Meditations" by Fernando Ortega. It can be slow for some people and the production was not great but his interpretation and performance of the songs are excellent.



I believe all my comments were beneficial and on topic. Thanks.

Agreed.

mflint
2006-01-14, 07:13
Yes, you *can* have read-write NTFS partitions with linux if you must, but need to use "Captive NTFS".

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captive_NTFS

It's dirty, but it works. Wouldn't be my choice though, as technically stuff like ext3 are superior.

radish
2006-01-14, 08:53
My last post on this (absurdly off topic) thread. The OP said (s)he wanted to use Linux. Wanted advice on filesystems with potential compatibility with Windows. Great - all excellent questions, which were answered pretty quickly. We then got a bunch of really redundant "linux is wonderful rah rah rah" posts which are not helping the OP (or anyone else that I can see) and are even factually wrong in places. Plus a thinly veiled attack on my competence and experience. Save it.

Robin Bowes
2006-01-16, 14:14
radish said the following on 14/01/2006 15:53:
> My last post on this (absurdly off topic) thread. The OP said (s)he
> wanted to use Linux. Wanted advice on filesystems with potential
> compatibility with Windows. Great - all excellent questions, which were
> answered pretty quickly. We then got a bunch of really redundant "linux
> is wonderful rah rah rah" posts which are not helping the OP (or anyone
> else that I can see) and are even factually wrong in places. Plus a
> thinly veiled attack on my competence and experience. Save it.

Jeez, you must be reading a different thread to me.

Drink less coffee.

R.
--
http://robinbowes.com

If a man speaks in a forest,
and his wife's not there,
is he still wrong?