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View Full Version : Confirming compatibility issue with SMC router



tyler_durden
2005-12-21, 14:36
I have the SMC2804WBRP-G router that is listed in the wiki as having a problem connecting to the SB-3. I can verify that in all modes of setting the router, it is not possible to connect to the SB-3. I have the latest firmware in the router. Testing was done with the SB-3 within 5 feet of the router. The SB-3 can see the SSID broadcast, but cannot connect.

If you have one of these routers, better get a different one if you want to use the SB-3.

TD

Mark Lanctot
2006-01-02, 22:03
At least this confirms what I was seeing.

I did try at least 5 or 6 versions of the firmware, starting with the first and ending with the last version 2s.

It's too bad I had to ditch this router because it had a very powerful, stable wireless module that puts the Linksys WRT54G to shame. It also had a very good firewall.

The good news about the WRT54G is that you can use 3rd party firmware, which adds considerable flexibility, although I have yet to see one which has the firewall that the SMC did. But since the 3rd party firmware is in active development, perhaps a powerful firewall will be added one day.

Could you add your name to the "Reported by" field? Also someone added info about the SB1. It would be useful if they could add "SB1" to the Slim Device Field, the SB1 firmware and their name as well.

Thanks.

Looks like this wiki page has grown immensely. It's good to see that there are many more routers that work than routers that don't. It should also show those having problems that their router does indeed work - or that the router itself is to blame.

stoobie-doo
2006-01-02, 22:15
I have the SMC2804WBRP-G router that is listed in the wiki as having a problem connecting to the SB-3. I can verify that in all modes of setting the router, it is not possible to connect to the SB-3. I have the latest firmware in the router. Testing was done with the SB-3 within 5 feet of the router. The SB-3 can see the SSID broadcast, but cannot connect.

If you have one of these routers, better get a different one if you want to use the SB-3.

TD
I found with my SMC that I could connect intermittantly via DHCP, but it was never reliable or permanent. I would not use the SMC with an SB3, period.

tyler_durden
2006-01-02, 22:31
At least this confirms what I was seeing.

It's too bad I had to ditch this router because it had a very powerful, stable wireless module that puts the Linksys WRT54G to shame. It also had a very good firewall.

The good news about the WRT54G is that you can use 3rd party firmware, which adds considerable flexibility, although I have yet to see one which has the firewall that the SMC did. But since the 3rd party firmware is in active development, perhaps a powerful firewall will be added one day.

Looks like this wiki page has grown immensely. It's good to see that there are many more routers that work than routers that don't. It should also show those having problems that their router does indeed work - or that the router itself is to blame.

I was very sorry to give up the print server that was in the SMC router.

The current crop of WRT54Gs is the version 5 hardware, (that I have) which is no longer linux based (there is a new WRT54-GL also that is still linux based, but you have to hunt for it and pay extra). It seems sort of silly- they change the hardware and firmware and call it by the same model number. If they think the model number is so hot that they want to keep it to sell routers, why do they go to the trouble of redesigning the hardware and firmware? It must be a LOT cheaper to manufacture the new one...

I try to add my 2 cents to the wiki page.

TD

Michaelwagner
2006-01-02, 23:17
I found this interesting
http://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS4729641740.html

especially these bits:

Linksys's director of product marketing, Mani Dhillon, said Linksys made the switch because, as a more deeply embedded system, VxWorks allowed the company to halve the amounts of Flash and RAM in the device, while retaining similar functionality. Apparently, reducing memory-related BOM (bill-of-materials) costs more than offset the costs of licensing a proprietary OS, given the WRT54G's extremely high sales volume. "We sell literally hundreds of thousands per month," Dhillon said.

The new, VxWorks-based WRT54G "series 5" models have 2MB of Flash, and 8MB of RAM, compared with 4MB of Flash and 16MB of RAM in the earlier, Linux-based versions.


According to Dhillon, Linksys's biggest competitors in the wireless access point market, including NetGear and D-Link, switched from Linux to VxWorks long ago. "Linux has a larger memory footprint. To be honest with you, a lot of companies in the networking space have already switched," he said.

Christian Pernegger
2006-01-03, 03:09
OT as it might be - I had three SMC switches die on me within 3-6
months. Now switches aren't routers but I suspect that the quality of
their products isn't quite up to par with the nice spec sheets.

C.

tyler_durden
2006-01-03, 09:35
I think it is an underhanded marketing trick to call the current WRT54G a WRT54G. Its like Ford selling lots of mustangs, so they decide to relabel Pintos as Mustangs and take the unknowing suckers for a ride.

It isn't the same hardware. It isn't the same firmware/OS. It isn't the same product.

TD