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patrick
2005-10-08, 17:53
All,

Last night Slim Devices lowered the price on Squeezebox2. Wireless is now
$249 (originally $299) and wired is now $179 (originally $249).

Line right up...you don't have wait any longer to purchase a second, third,
or even fourth Squeezebox2! (https://secure.slimdevices.com/order/)

Have a great weekend,

Patrick

---
Patrick Cosson
V-P, Sales & Marketing
Slim Devices, Inc.
415-359-7407 cell
413-638-5248 efax

"Simply put, Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 is the best product in its class.
You're not buying a computer peripheral, but rather a superbly engineered
audiophile component."

Editors¹ Choice | LAPTOP Magazine | September 2005

hifijames
2005-10-08, 21:25
Do I get refund? I just bought at $279 :-)

Maditude
2005-10-08, 22:16
> Do I get refund? I just bought at $279 :-)

Me too! Should be here Monday. It's not a big deal, but this is the second time it's happened to me now (bought my second [wired] squeezebox just before they dropped the price from 249 to 199).

If you see any annoucements here in the forum from me about buying yet another squeezebox [they are awesome], that's probably your cue to hold off for about a week to two. :-P

Dave D
2005-10-09, 06:04
Line right up...you don't have wait any longer to purchase a second, third, or even fourth Squeezebox2!

Patrick, can you give any hints about if this price drop is inspired by an upcoming new or additional product offering? I would be disappointed to buy another SB2, only to see an "audiophile" version come out a few months later, or a version with integrated amplifier, etc.

An example of a great company which gives hints about new product offerings at the same time as offering sales on existing products is AV123 (av123.com). I recently bought a set of their closeout Rocket ELT speakers, even though I knew that they were coming out with a whole new line of even better speakers for the budget-minded folks (the X-series). Why didn't I wait for X? I just didn't like the new finish offerings, vs. the older speakers. But at least I had a choice.

I know that might be a bit radical approach to marketing, but it's very effective. AV123 has an extremely loyal customer base, similar to that of Slim Devices, who are constantly salivating about product offerings which are announced far in advance of availability. By the time the product is available, they've often sold out of the first shipments via pre-orders.

I'm not suggesting a "far in advance" approach in your market of audio electronics. Not even suggesting that you give details of any product until it is released (your competitors could be faster than you). However, a little hint would be nice, e.g. "yes, we're planning a new product release around the holidays which will be geared more toward the higher end." Or if it's just good ol' Slim Devices, making their flagship more affordable, you could make that clear, as well.

Removing the "2" from the SB2's splash screen has us all wondering what's going on.

Thanks, Dave

patrick
2005-10-09, 09:05
"no hints, no forecasts, no previews."
- Justice Ginsberg

As she stated during her congressional hearings when nominated for the US
Supreme Court


---
Patrick Cosson
V-P, Sales & Marketing
Slim Devices, Inc.
415-359-7407 cell
413-638-5248 efax

"Simply put, Slim Devices' Squeezebox2 is the best product in its class.
You're not buying a computer peripheral, but rather a superbly engineered
audiophile component."

Editors¹ Choice | LAPTOP Magazine | September 2005





On 10/9/05 6:04 AM, "Dave D" <Dave.D.1wmyqb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com>
wrote:

>
> patrick Wrote:
>> Line right up...you don't have wait any longer to purchase a second,
>> third, or even fourth Squeezebox2!
>
> Patrick, can you give any hints about if this price drop is inspired by
> an upcoming new or additional product offering? I would be disappointed
> to buy another SB2, only to see an "audiophile" version come out a few
> months later, or a version with integrated amplifier, etc.
>
> An example of a great company which gives hints about new product
> offerings at the same time as offering sales on existing products is
> AV123 (av123.com). I recently bought a set of their closeout Rocket
> ELT speakers, even though I knew that they were coming out with a whole
> new line of even better speakers for the budget-minded folks (the
> X-series). Why didn't I wait for X? I just didn't like the new finish
> offerings, vs. the older speakers. But at least I had a choice.
>
> I know that might be a bit radical approach to marketing, but it's very
> effective. AV123 has an extremely loyal customer base, similar to that
> of Slim Devices, who are constantly salivating about product offerings
> which are announced far in advance of availability. By the time the
> product is available, they've often sold out of the first shipments via
> pre-orders.
>
> I'm not suggesting a "far in advance" approach in your market of audio
> electronics. Not even suggesting that you give details of any product
> until it is released (your competitors could be faster than you).
> However, a little hint would be nice, e.g. "yes, we're planning a new
> product release around the holidays which will be geared more toward
> the higher end." Or if it's just good ol' Slim Devices, making their
> flagship more affordable, you could make that clear, as well.
>
> Removing the "2" from the SB2's splash screen has us all wondering
> what's going on.
>
> Thanks, Dave
>

pfarrell
2005-10-09, 09:22
On Sun, 2005-10-09 at 06:04 -0700, Dave D wrote:
> Patrick, can you give any hints about if this price drop is inspired by
> an upcoming new or additional product offering?

See Patrick's response.

> An example of a great company which gives hints about new product
> offerings at the same time as offering sales on existing products is
> AV123 (av123.com).

Most companies learned from Osborne Computers, one of the stars of
personal computing in the late 70s. They announced the next great thing,
and all the potential customers decided not to buy the current thing,
destroying sales and depriving the company of the money they needed
to develop the next great thing. They went poof.

I predict that the price of the SqueezeBox2 will go down slightly over
time. Then sometime in the future, an new cooler product will come out
at about the same price as the initial price of the SqueezeBox2.

Intel has done pretty well with this business model.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

Marc Sherman
2005-10-09, 09:23
Pat Farrell wrote:
>
> I predict that the price of the SqueezeBox2 will go down slightly
> over time. Then sometime in the future, an new cooler product will
> come out at about the same price as the initial price of the
> SqueezeBox2.
>
> Intel has done pretty well with this business model.

It's a pretty standard model. The first few runs of the new hardware
were probably relatively small, so that any bugs in the new hardware
(such as the processor unseating, and the capacitor in the analog out
stage, etc) could be worked out before the next run. As the bugs are
eliminated, subsequent production runs can be larger, and per-part
prices drop.

- Marc

Michaelwagner
2005-10-09, 09:47
Most companies learned from Osborne Computers, one of the stars of personal computing in the late 70s. They announced the next great thing, and all the potential customers decided not to buy the current thing, destroying sales and depriving the company of the money they needed to develop the next great thing. They went poof.
Commodore nearly did the same thing a few years later.

They recovered from it, but then died trying to bring to market and support umpty-ump versions of the Amiga, as in:

Amiga as IBM PC killer (with an add-in PC emulator card)
Amiga as Mac killer (already was one, IMHO)
the BIG AMIGA
the small amiga
etc.

May be a lesson there too.

=?UTF-8?B?TXIgTsO1dQ==?=
2005-10-09, 10:22
Pat Farrell wrote:
> On Sun, 2005-10-09 at 06:04 -0700, Dave D wrote:
>> Patrick, can you give any hints about if this price drop is inspired by
>> an upcoming new or additional product offering?
>
> See Patrick's response.
>
>> An example of a great company which gives hints about new product
>> offerings at the same time as offering sales on existing products is
>> AV123 (av123.com).
>
> Most companies learned from Osborne Computers, one of the stars of
> personal computing in the late 70s. They announced the next great thing,
> and all the potential customers decided not to buy the current thing,
> destroying sales and depriving the company of the money they needed
> to develop the next great thing. They went poof.
>
> I predict that the price of the SqueezeBox2 will go down slightly over
> time. Then sometime in the future, an new cooler product will come out
> at about the same price as the initial price of the SqueezeBox2.
>
> Intel has done pretty well with this business model.
>

I agree with your assessment completely Pat, but.., our R Cringley
issued a clarification regarding the Osbourne effect back in June.

"The Osborne Effect
Sometimes What Everyone Remembers Is Wrong"

http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20050616.html

best,
peter

stinkingpig
2005-10-09, 14:41
Mr Nõu wrote:

> ...
> I agree with your assessment completely Pat, but.., our R Cringley
> issued a clarification regarding the Osbourne effect back in June.
>
> "The Osborne Effect
> Sometimes What Everyone Remembers Is Wrong"
>
> http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20050616.html


and as I'm sure you and Cringely both know, myths of popular culture
survive because they're useful, not because they're 100% factual.

--
Jack At Monkeynoodle Dot Org: It's A Scientific Venture!
"I spent all me tin with the ladies drinking gin
so across the Western ocean I must wander" -- trad.

Michaelwagner
2005-10-09, 17:14
Another good reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect

hifijames
2005-10-10, 11:41
Seriously, 30-day Satisfaction Guarantee technically covers the price drop if we do choose to return it and buy a new one at lower price. Not a good thing to either party. The better way is to refund something like $15. :)
Not that I care about $30 so much. It will certainly show that SD does care about its customers' interests.

mbsb2
2005-10-11, 12:02
Asked Slim Devices about possible refund last night --- no reply yet. I received my replacement SB2 yesterday (first one couldn't power up).

snarlydwarf
2005-10-12, 11:47
I just got my 2nd sb2 and had to unbox it at work to show people why one just isn't enough. ("You need one of these in every room you listen to music ... you could be able to do with Softsqueeze in the office, but you need this for anyroom with real speakers.")

It did include everything.

I was surprised to find a tshirt.

Where's my pony, though?

max.spicer
2005-10-12, 12:11
T-shirt? That's new! They just keep raising the bar, don't they. When I get my next squeezebox, I want a t-shirt, a pony and a signed photo of Sean! :-)

Max



I was surprised to find a tshirt.

Where's my pony, though?

max.spicer
2005-10-12, 12:13
Actually, that reminds me of my Amiga days. The first Amiga famously had the signatures of its designers and a pawprint of the lead designer's dog embossed inside the cover. I'm therefore increasing my demands - I want the lead designer's dog as well!

Max


T-shirt? That's new! They just keep raising the bar, don't they. When I get my next squeezebox, I want a t-shirt, a pony and a signed photo of Sean! :-)

Max

Michaelwagner
2005-10-12, 12:48
Ah, the Amiga. Sigh. Still have mine somewhere in storage.

Sean, I think that's the only piece of technology I never took apart. Dunno why. Just seemed so irreverent, somehow. Plus, back then, spare parts weren't very easy to come by if I broke it.

hmmm...kinda like now, actually. Seen any spare amiga parts recently?

I saw pictures of the signatures on the plastic mold, never opened mine to see it tho.

Michael

jimdibb
2005-10-12, 12:56
I've got a whole amiga 1000 setup, working condition, with external ram
(starboard II, maybe not working), disk drives, lots of floppys/sw in
various conditions, mouse if anyone is interested. I could come back with a
more complete list and an asking price.

It does have the designers names on the inside.

On 10/12/05, Michaelwagner <
Michaelwagner.1wt1hb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
>
> Ah, the Amiga. Sigh. Still have mine somewhere in storage.
>
> Sean, I think that's the only piece of technology I never took apart.
> Dunno why. Just seemed so irreverent, somehow. Plus, back then, spare
> parts weren't very easy to come by if I broke it.
>
> hmmm...kinda like now, actually. Seen any spare amiga parts recently?
>
> I saw pictures of the signatures on the plastic mold, never opened mine
> to see it tho.
>
> Michael
>
>
> --
> Michaelwagner
>

CardinalFang
2005-10-12, 13:04
It does have the designers names on the inside.


Apple used to do that too until they relaised that was a handy way for recruitment agencies to identify all their top designers so that they could poach them for other companies :-)

Jeff Coffler
2005-10-12, 13:09
> T-shirt? That's new! They just keep raising the bar, don't they. When
> I get my next squeezebox, I want a t-shirt, a pony and a signed photo of
> Sean! :-)

A signed picture of Sean? Hopefully not scantily clad, right???!!! ;-)

kdf
2005-10-12, 13:17
Quoting Jeff Coffler <jeff-list-slimdiscuss (AT) taltos (DOT) com>:

>> T-shirt? That's new! They just keep raising the bar, don't they. When
>> I get my next squeezebox, I want a t-shirt, a pony and a signed photo of
>> Sean! :-)
>
> A signed picture of Sean? Hopefully not scantily clad, right???!!! ;-)
>
careful what you wish for. enough armagnac and I wouldn't want to guess what
Sean might think is a good idea.

-k

seanadams
2005-10-12, 13:50
Quoting Jeff Coffler <jeff-list-slimdiscuss (AT) taltos (DOT) com>:

>> T-shirt? That's new! They just keep raising the bar, don't they. When
>> I get my next squeezebox, I want a t-shirt, a pony and a signed photo of
>> Sean! :-)
>
> A signed picture of Sean? Hopefully not scantily clad, right???!!! ;-)
>
careful what you wish for. enough armagnac and I wouldn't want to guess what
Sean might think is a good idea.

-k

In other news, we've cancelled plans for our textiles division and are now hurriedly constructing a mobile off-shore Foie Gras operation in time for the upcoming ban in California.

Michaelwagner
2005-10-12, 21:10
I've got a whole amiga 1000 setup, working condition, with external ram (starboard II, maybe not working), disk drives, lots of floppys/sw in various conditions, mouse if anyone is interested. I could come back with a more complete list and an asking price.
I had a 1000 with 2MB external RAM thing, whatever it was called back then, and an extra drive. Haven't powered it up in years, but it's in good condition. Should try some time. Software too, but I don't know how well it fared stored in the basement.

Michaelwagner
2005-10-12, 21:12
now hurriedly constructing a mobile off-shore Foie Gras operation in time for the upcoming ban in California.
Just build it on the ocean side of highway 101 and wait for it to detach and float off-shore by itself. Then you can claim you didn't purposely try for an off-shore operation.

scalesr1
2005-10-12, 22:26
Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio Scientific
Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory add-on
board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I bet
someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and some 7
segment displays - am I right?

Richard


-----Original Message-----
From: Michaelwagner
[mailto:Michaelwagner.1wtouz (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com]
Sent: 13 October 2005 05:10
To: discuss (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com
Subject: [slim] Re: New low price on SB2!


jimdibb Wrote:
> I've got a whole amiga 1000 setup, working condition, with external ram
> (starboard II, maybe not working), disk drives, lots of floppys/sw in
> various conditions, mouse if anyone is interested. I could come back
> with a more complete list and an asking price.
I had a 1000 with 2MB external RAM thing, whatever it was called back
then, and an extra drive. Haven't powered it up in years, but it's in
good condition. Should try some time. Software too, but I don't know
how well it fared stored in the basement.


--
Michaelwagner

Michaelwagner
2005-10-13, 07:06
Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio Scientific Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory add-on board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I bet someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and some 7
segment displays - am I right?
I had a 6502 based thing called a KIM pretty much as you describe. 7 segment led displays. I wire wrapped a whopping 4K of static memory and connected it to the board with a ribbon cable, increasing my memory 5 fold (slow clocks). It had a serial port so I built a 16 line x 64 character video terminal and did most of my work with that.

P.S. Why am I not surprised to find old hobby computing pioneers on this site? Ohio Scientific Superboard. Oh, my. Never saw one. Only read about them. My friend who was president of the science club at the time home built an 8008 system with toggle switches and core memory.

Bill Burns
2005-10-13, 08:17
Richard Scales wrote:
> Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio Scientific
> Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory add-on
> board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I bet
> someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and some 7
> segment displays - am I right?

Hex keypad!!! We used to *dream* of having a hex keypad and
seven-segment displays!

My Altair (still in the attic) had toggle switches and LEDs; if you were
very lucky you could key in the Teletype KSR interface in about 5
minutes, then you could load programs from paper tape into the 1K of memory.

--
Bill Burns
Long Island NY USA
mailto:billb (AT) ftldesign (DOT) com

dean
2005-10-13, 08:22
On Oct 13, 2005, at 8:17 AM, Bill Burns wrote:

> Richard Scales wrote:
>
>> Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio
>> Scientific
>> Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own
>> memory add-on
>> board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but
>> I bet
>> someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and
>> some 7
>> segment displays - am I right?
>>
>
> Hex keypad!!! We used to *dream* of having a hex keypad and seven-
> segment displays!
>
> My Altair (still in the attic) had toggle switches and LEDs; if you
> were very lucky you could key in the Teletype KSR interface in
> about 5 minutes, then you could load programs from paper tape into
> the 1K of memory.
YOU HAD LEDS AND SWITCHES? I would have killed for that! We had
bare wires and relays and were happy to have them!

Kids today!

Bill Burns
2005-10-13, 09:08
dean blackketter wrote:
>
> On Oct 13, 2005, at 8:17 AM, Bill Burns wrote:
>
>> Richard Scales wrote:
>>
>>> Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio
>>> Scientific
>>> Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory
>>> add-on
>>> board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I bet
>>> someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and some 7
>>> segment displays - am I right?
>>>
>>
>> Hex keypad!!! We used to *dream* of having a hex keypad and
>> seven-segment displays!
>>
>> My Altair (still in the attic) had toggle switches and LEDs; if you
>> were very lucky you could key in the Teletype KSR interface in about 5
>> minutes, then you could load programs from paper tape into the 1K of
>> memory.
> YOU HAD LEDS AND SWITCHES? I would have killed for that! We had bare
> wires and relays and were happy to have them!

You had WIRE!!! We had to get up in the morning and go down t' mine,
dig the copper ore, smelt it, and make our own wire every day.

--
Bill Burns
Long Island NY USA
mailto:billb (AT) ftldesign (DOT) com

max.spicer
2005-10-13, 09:15
You had MINES!!!! etc etc ;-)

Max


dean blackketter wrote:
>
> On Oct 13, 2005, at 8:17 AM, Bill Burns wrote:
>
>> Richard Scales wrote:
>>
>>> Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio
>>> Scientific
>>> Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory
>>> add-on
>>> board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I bet
>>> someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and some 7
>>> segment displays - am I right?
>>>
>>
>> Hex keypad!!! We used to *dream* of having a hex keypad and
>> seven-segment displays!
>>
>> My Altair (still in the attic) had toggle switches and LEDs; if you
>> were very lucky you could key in the Teletype KSR interface in about 5
>> minutes, then you could load programs from paper tape into the 1K of
>> memory.
> YOU HAD LEDS AND SWITCHES? I would have killed for that! We had bare
> wires and relays and were happy to have them!

You had WIRE!!! We had to get up in the morning and go down t' mine,
dig the copper ore, smelt it, and make our own wire every day.

--
Bill Burns
Long Island NY USA
mailto:billb (AT) ftldesign (DOT) com

CardinalFang
2005-10-13, 09:17
YOU HAD LEDS AND SWITCHES? I would have killed for that! We had
bare wires and relays and were happy to have them!

LEDS AND SWITCHES. LUXURY. We had wet string and tin cans etc.

It all reminds me of my career actually. Started off repairing old pinball machines with relays and bells as a teenager, moved onto core memory and processors built up from individual gates and ALUs and then onto the meaty stuff - Z80s. 386's, 486's Pentiums, and so on. Now, I've gone full circle and it's games on cell phones...well nearly full circles, the phones ring like they have bells, but they have surprisingly fast processors and no relays. Not full circle at all in fact. Don't know why I said that.

scalesr1
2005-10-13, 10:38
... and I bet he lived in t'shoe box in t'middle of road etc.etc.etc.

-----Original Message-----
From: max.spicer [mailto:max.spicer.1wumfb (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com]
Sent: 13 October 2005 17:15
To: discuss (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com
Subject: [slim] Re: New low price on SB2!


You had MINES!!!! etc etc ;-)

Max

Bill Burns Wrote:
> dean blackketter wrote:
> >
> > On Oct 13, 2005, at 8:17 AM, Bill Burns wrote:
> >
> >> Richard Scales wrote:
> >>
> >>> Well, I have never owned an Amiga - I started out with an Ohio
> >>> Scientific
> >>> Superboard with 4K of Ram, to fit more I had to build my own memory
>
> >>> add-on
> >>> board. I am struggling to think what was around before this - but I
> bet
> >>> someone out there had some 8080 based thing with a hex keypad and
> some 7
> >>> segment displays - am I right?
> >>>
> >>
> >> Hex keypad!!! We used to *dream* of having a hex keypad and
> >> seven-segment displays!
> >>
> >> My Altair (still in the attic) had toggle switches and LEDs; if you
>
> >> were very lucky you could key in the Teletype KSR interface in about
> 5
> >> minutes, then you could load programs from paper tape into the 1K of
>
> >> memory.
> > YOU HAD LEDS AND SWITCHES? I would have killed for that! We had
> bare
> > wires and relays and were happy to have them!
>
> You had WIRE!!! We had to get up in the morning and go down t' mine,
> dig the copper ore, smelt it, and make our own wire every day.
>
> --
> Bill Burns
> Long Island NY USA
> mailto:billb (AT) ftldesign (DOT) com


--
max.spicer

The wild things roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible
teeth
and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws
but Max stepped into his private boat and waved good-bye