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usualsuspects
2005-09-17, 06:56
What Linux distro does slimserver run best on? Is it entirely Perl or is there some C/C++ (or something else) code in there? I don't have a major preference on Linux distros - could run whatever works best. I will end up having at least one OpenBSD box on my network - anyone run Slimserver on OpenBSD? I know from painful experience that it can be a challenge to get software that is developed on/for Linux to compile and run correctly on OBSD - also it has Perl taint "issues" - thoughts?

pfarrell
2005-09-17, 08:37
On Sat, 2005-09-17 at 06:56 -0700, usualsuspects wrote:
> What Linux distro does slimserver run best on?

I have no idea. I run it on Mandriva
I have no idea what best is :-)

> Is it entirely Perl or is
> there some C/C++ (or something else) code in there?

It is all perl. it needs a few CPAN modules, all the rest
is included in the distribution kit.

> Slimserver on OpenBSD? I know from painful experience that it can be a
> challenge to get software that is developed on/for Linux to compile and
> run correctly on OBSD - also it has Perl taint "issues" - thoughts?

Do you know about the live CD that Michael offers? All setup with
slimserver and ready to boogie.

--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com

Patrick Dixon
2005-09-17, 12:01
I've run it on FC3 and on Ubuntu (Debian). Both work fine and were pretty easy to get going even for a non-Linux expert like me.

I've got no idea what's best either!

The SlimCD is Debian based.

Bruce Hartley
2005-09-18, 01:33
Patrick,

totally off topic, but I was just looking at your website from your sig, (as you're in the UK).

I notice you're in Yate, about 30 miles from me in Worle.

bizarre.

Will have to remember that if I ever need your type of services.

Patrick Dixon
2005-09-18, 03:30
Bruce, if you'd like to hear my modified SB2 just give me a ring.

Bruce Hartley
2005-09-18, 11:45
thanks, might take you up on that.
I'm just convinving myself to re-rip my cds as flac, currently high bit rate VBR MP3s.

If I could hear what I could ultimately achieve it, might convince me.

cliveb
2005-09-23, 04:34
I will end up having at least one OpenBSD box on my network - anyone run Slimserver on OpenBSD? I know from painful experience that it can be a challenge to get software that is developed on/for Linux to compile and run correctly on OBSD - also it has Perl taint "issues" - thoughts?
I run Slimserver on FreeBSD. Presumably it's similar to OpenBSD. I deliberately chose it as I had cobbled together an old 500MHz AMD K6 with 128MB RAM from bits I had kicking around, so wanted the lightest footprint possible - no GUIs or sissy stuff like that. It's been running smoothly and without intervention in the attic for a few months.

I know very little about FreeBSD (and before I started, knew zilch). It probably helped that about 10 years ago I was fairly experienced with Unix System V, so most of the FreeBSD incantations were familiar to me.

The FreeBSD ports facility works like a dream, and Slimserver is available from it. I just set up CVSup, configured the ports I wanted, and let her rip. It deals with all the interdependencies and I had very few issues that needed manual intervention.

Does OpenBSD have a similar facility?

usualsuspects
2005-09-23, 06:54
OBSD has ports (source patch sets) and packages (binary). I don't see slimserver in either. I'm starting to think that I should run slimserver on Linux (perhaps CentOS) and leave OBSD to do other things. Then again, I am considering not putting an OBSD box in at all now. My main reason for having it was firewalling and routing, I really like PF, but it looks like my Netgear router may be up to the task. Thanks for the heads-up on FreeBSD - out of curiosity, how far back is the FreeBSD port of slimserver version-wise? Is it synced up to the latest version on a regular basis, or does it lag behind? Do you have problems with "Windows only" stream formats?

cliveb
2005-09-23, 10:49
Thanks for the heads-up on FreeBSD - out of curiosity, how far back is the FreeBSD port of slimserver version-wise? Is it synced up to the latest version on a regular basis, or does it lag behind? Do you have problems with "Windows only" stream formats?
I think the latest version available in the ports collection is 6.1.1; so I guess it does lag behind a bit. I'm running 6.0.2, and have had no reason to update it - it works well, and if it ain't broke....

What do you mean by "Windows only stream formats"? If you're referring to Windows codecs such as WMA, then that's not an issue for me: all my stuff is in FLAC format. But I've probably misunderstood your question.

street_samurai
2005-09-23, 12:00
Running Slimserver on Debian has been a dream. I'm by no means a Linux expert but once you've done the relatively simple (for Linux) setup... Squeeze seems to run very well right about 4-5% of total system resources.

No idea if its "the best" but with the new installer and apt-get, debian has been worlds better than other distro's that I've tried.

ss.

usualsuspects
2005-09-23, 13:00
What do you mean by "Windows only stream formats"? If you're referring to Windows codecs such as WMA, then that's not an issue for me: all my stuff is in FLAC format.

I should have been clear: windows codecs. I use squeeze for critical (lossless ripped) as well as casual listening (streams of various formats). I am trying to get a feel for what streams might not work on a non-Microsoft platform.


Running Slimserver on Debian has been a dream
I have a fondness for Debian, APT is a joy to work with. My only complaint is the glacial pace that Debian stable moves at. (I understand wanting a stable platform to be stable - but there is stable, and there is fossilized). I have two boxes running Debian Woody that I have not gotten around to upgrading to Sarge, mainly because for all of the important software on them, I gave up on the Debian packages and built from source more recent versions.

Slimserver looks like the kind of software that I will keep updated to the bleeding edge. New features in both the software and the embedded firmware of recent nightly’s are useful to me, and so a packaged version is not desirable. It looks like Slimserver will be easy to update as the only dependencies are perl modules. This is my main reason for my original posting question about what the “best” distro might be. Nightly’s often work well only on the platform that they are developed on/for.

street_samurai
2005-09-23, 13:43
My only complaint is the glacial pace that Debian stable moves at.

Don't want to turn this topic into a distro rant or get way off topic, but...

Stable moves at a glacial pace for the exact reason you mentioned. Thats why there is Testing and Unstable. Testing has most of the newer builds of software and you can always go to Unstable if you want the bleeding edge. Think of other quicker-to-update distros as being just like Debian Unstable.


Slimserver looks like the kind of software that I will keep updated to the bleeding edge. New features in both the software and the embedded firmware of recent nightly’s are useful to me, and so a packaged version is not desirable. It looks like Slimserver will be easy to update as the only dependencies are perl modules. This is my main reason for my original posting question about what the “best” distro might be. Nightly’s often work well only on the platform that they are developed on/for.

I don't fully understand this paragraph in terms of what you mean by a "packaged version" but I'm fairly sure that I've read that some (all?) of the Slim developers use Debian as they dev platform... I've personally never had any significant problems with the Nightly builds:

Stop the server. Unpack into the slim directory. Start the server. Couldn't be easier.

ss.

Michaelwagner
2005-10-07, 18:58
It probably helped that about 10 years ago I was fairly experienced with Unix System V
Sigh. I feel old just reading this. 20 (!) years ago I was sysadmin for a large IBM mainframe VM (Virtual Machine) system running multiple copies of system 6 and later system 7. Still recovering from all the unpronounceable, unmemorable command names (rm, stty, ps - my favorite - the etc directory).

usualsuspects
2005-10-08, 08:34
Sigh. I feel old just reading this. 20 (!) years ago I was sysadmin for a large IBM mainframe VM (Virtual Machine) system running multiple copies of system 6 and later system 7. Still recovering from all the unpronounceable, unmemorable command names (rm, stty, ps - my favorite - the etc directory).

Funny how 20 years on - those same commands are still used. If I had a penny for every time I typed "ps aux" or "netstat -pl" - I would have at least $6.87 :-) OpenBSD likes to chroot everything - so you end up with a bunch of mini-file systems - each with its own /etc directory - huge fun for backup and restore.

I decided to go with CentOS 4.1 - easy OS install and zero issues so far running slimserver. Redhat just loves to put things in strange places, and even a "minimal" install puts more stuff in the file system that what I would call minimal, but those are minor issues.

DavidHull
2005-10-10, 17:40
Just for the record, I just successfully installed the latest SlimServer nightly on OpenBSD 3.7 without too much trouble. There were two changes I made:

1. I removed the flac and oggdec executables in the Bin/i386-openbsd directory supplied in the distribution tar file. They did not seem to be valid openbsd executables. I installed the flac and vorbis-tools OpenBSD packages in their place.

2. Instead of running the Bin/build-perl-modules.pl script, I installed the necessary Perl modules from the OpenBSD packages and then modified slimserver.pl to use the newly-installed OpenBSD versions instead of the SlimDevices-supplied modules.

bernt
2005-10-10, 22:52
If you want a server with a small footprint, easy install and autoupdate. Try Trustix http://www.trustix.org.

coach
2005-10-13, 11:28
I'm running on my OBSD 3.6 box at home no problems there. The only problems have to do with transcoding and lack of horsepower. And while OpenBSD is good, it can't add Hz to my CPU.

DavidHull
2005-10-13, 17:53
I've created an OpenBSD package/port that should make it easy to install SlimServer 6.1.1 on an i386-based OpenBSD system. It works for me on OpenBSD 3.7.

I've make them available at http://members.dslextreme.com/~hull/openbsd/


http://members.dslextreme.com/~hull/openbsd/slimserver-6.1.1.tgz
This is the i386 package. It's about 5 MB.

http://members.dslextreme.com/~hull/openbsd/slimserver-6.1.1.port.tar.gz
This is the port which contains the code I used to create the package.


I'm using lame, flac, oggdec, and faad to transcode formats.

I've modified the stock slimserver sources a little in an attempt to make it more secure, but I don't promise much because slimserver currently isn't designed for security.