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Deaf Cat
2005-05-08, 14:18
Hiya,

Just sorting out what exactly I need to run the SB2 without wires.

I have an old desk top win98 AMD 300MHz, and a more recent XP 1.2GHz laptop. It would be nice to use the desk top as the base / music store if possible.

To start with though - do you think I would be able to get a wireless card to slot into the laptop and use it with the SB2 in, I think it is Peer-to-Peer or Ad Hoc mode...?

I look forward to any suggestions.

dean
2005-05-08, 21:12
While you could set up an ad hoc network with a wireless card, I'd
strongly recommend getting an inexpensive wireless router and connect
your desktop to that via ethernet. Then connect your Squeezebox to
the router wirelessly.

It'll be easier to set up, be more reliable and probably cost less.


On May 8, 2005, at 2:18 PM, Deaf Cat wrote:

>
> Hiya,
>
> Just sorting out what exactly I need to run the SB2 without wires.
>
> I have an old desk top win98 AMD 300MHz, and a more recent XP 1.2GHz
> laptop. It would be nice to use the desk top as the base / music
> store
> if possible.
>
> To start with though - do you think I would be able to get a wireless
> card to slot into the laptop and use it with the SB2 in, I think it is
> Peer-to-Peer or Ad Hoc mode...?
>
> I look forward to any suggestions.
>
>
> --
> Deaf Cat
>

Deaf Cat
2005-05-09, 03:40
Cheers for the reply,

Leading to another question I am afraid:

Most of my music files will be of the lossless type.
I think I read somewhere that a 10M g router would be ok for MP3 files.

Would it be a good idea to go for the 54M g when using lossless files ?

Thanks

Mark Bennett
2005-05-09, 12:18
On Mon, 2005-05-09 at 03:40 -0700, Deaf Cat wrote:
> Most of my music files will be of the lossless type.
> I think I read somewhere that a 10M g router would be ok for MP3
> files.

802.11b (11mbps) can be OK for lossless music streamed at
full PCM data rates, but it depends on your environment.

I have run a system pretty reliably over the 802.11b for
over a year with minimal dropout problems, but:

a) None of my neighbours have a wireless network
b) I rarely listened to music in the bedroom at the same
time we were using the microwave
c) The SB was reasonably close to my access point
(15 foot and one solid brick wall)
d) Most of the time the SB was the only thing using
the network

Now my SB1 has been moved to the kitchen I get regular
dropouts because of c), and certainly b).

> Would it be a good idea to go for the 54M g when using lossless files
> ?

If you have the choice, I think it's pretty much a no-brainer
to say yes.

If you only ever have SB1's, never plan to get anything
faster than 11b and can stick to the rules listed above,
then you might get away with 11b. 54g access points are
probably almost the same price as 11b, and will work much
better with an SB2.

(Although ironically, since the SB2 can do local flac
decoding and has a bigger buffer it can probably handle
being on an 11b network much better than an SB1 could
- never tried though.)

--
"The biggest problem encountered while trying to design a system that
was completely foolproof, was, that people tended to underestimate the
ingenuity of complete fools." (Douglas Adams)

Deaf Cat
2005-05-09, 14:36
Cheers Mark,

Makes sence once its explained, do you have any thoughts on the Pre-N routers ?

Will probably be 10m at most and 2 walls and a partition in the way.

All new this networking gear to me so good to hear advice.

Mark Bennett
2005-05-10, 00:34
On Mon, 2005-05-09 at 14:36 -0700, Deaf Cat wrote:
> Cheers Mark,
>
> Makes sence once its explained, do you have any thoughts on the Pre-N
> routers ?

I don't have any direct experience of the pre-n routers. On
the face of it they seem a good thing. They claim greater
range than G routers, which in turn should give better
bandwidth at the same range. However, there are a couple
of points to be aware of (probably not a complete list):

a) The 802.11n standard is not yet fully defined, which
is why the routers are called pre-n. It may well be
that the existing hardware can be firmware upgraded to
the full 802.11n when it is ratified, but there are
unlikely to be any guarantees, and your box may have
to fall back to 802.11g standards to talk to real .11n
hardware.
b) The extended range of the 802.11n devices also widens
the distribution of your data, and opens scope for
people to hack into your network from further away.
Make sure your security settings are as good as they
can be.
c) I believe that the absolute max bandwidth of the 802.11n
is no better that the .11G+ or turbo products that are
currently widely available. However if you are further
from your access point, then you should get better
bandwidth.
d) The SB2 is only a .11g product, so I'm not sure how much
the pre-n benefits will affect the communication with it.
I suspect that the dual antenna arrangement on the access
will still give some range improvement, but I don't know
for sure.

> Will probably be 10m at most and 2 walls and a partitionin the way.

If these are two solid brick walls then it might be worth
considering the pre-n kit, even my SB2 only sees around 30%
wireless strength in a condition which is probably similar
on a standard g+ access point.

I don't know for sure how much a pre-n will help much though,
because of d).

--
"The biggest problem encountered while trying to design a system that
was completely foolproof, was, that people tended to underestimate the
ingenuity of complete fools." (Douglas Adams)

Deaf Cat
2005-05-10, 04:40
Usefull Tips Thanks.

I suppose if I go down the 11g 54M route I could use a long crossover cable or normal cable which ever is used to run the access point into the loft from the server, so signals will only have to go through one ceiling.....