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Gerald B. Cox
2005-03-13, 08:54
I have opened a feature request (Bug 1061) as follows:

"Native support of OGG VORBIS format in firmware. I've read that FLAC is now
supported in Slimserver2. My friends and I have been waiting for native OGG
VORBIS support. It is a drag to have to incur the overhead and increased
bandwidth requirements to convert to WAV. The option to use LAME to convert to
MP3 kind of defeats the purpose of having a OGG library in the first place. If
we wanted MP3 we would have encoded in that format in the first place. What are
the plans to support the OGG VORBIS format in firmware?"

I received a prompt response:

"SB2 has the option of transcoding to FLAC rather than MP3. This gives you the
bandwidth benefits of compression without the quality loss of MP3. It's not
quite the same as Ogg Vorbis in firmware, but I'm hoping it's a reasonable
stopgap measure."

Does anyone have any additional information if this support is being seriously
considered; and the timeframe that it may be implemented? I would think my
friends and I aren't the only ones using this format, esp. with the advent of
OGG support in various radio feeds, various portable devices, etc. Is this
something that cannot be supported in SB2, and could only be made available in
SB3, SB4 or SBx?

Daryle A. Tilroe
2005-03-13, 12:03
Gerald B. Cox wrote:

> I have opened a feature request (Bug 1061) as follows:
>
> "Native support of OGG VORBIS format in firmware. I've read that FLAC is now
> supported in Slimserver2. My friends and I have been waiting for native OGG

Well we had to wait about a year and buy new hardware to get
native FLAC (NOTE: not a complaint; just an observation) so I
would anticipate spring 2006 and the SB3. ;-)

Personally I think that OGG VORBIS may become 'betacized'.
Sure it is better than MP3 but MP3 is the 'VHS' of audio and
FLAC/AppleLossless are the two 'DVD' contenders. With the
constantly increasing bandwidth and storage capacity those
who are serious about quality will go FLAC, Apple Lossless,
or even uncompressed and almost everyone else will be happy
with the ubiquitous MP3 de facto standard (until, perhaps,
that bandwidth and storage curve makes it irrelevant as well.
Personally I hope FLAC becomes the lossless de facto standard.
In any event I strongly suspect 'better than MP3' lossy formats
will slowly loose all traction in the market.

--
Daryle A. Tilroe