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Maurice Poirier
2005-03-02, 14:27
I have two computers on my network, both connected to a router, itself connected to a cable modem (all wired). This morning I turned on the server computer (Windows XP), connected the Squeezebox to the router and installed it. But I omitted to turn on the second computer (Windows 98) before doing so. The Squeezebox is working fine, but I think it usurped the IP address of the computer that was not turned on, because with this computer I now get the message:

The system has detected a conflict for IP address 192.168.0.3 with the system having hardware address 00:0B:DB:BF:44:!E

How can I resolve this mess?
Many thanks.

mherger
2005-03-02, 14:38
> I have two computers on my network, both connected to a router, itself
> connected to a cable modem (all wired). This morning I turned on the
> server computer (Windows XP), connected the Squeezebox to the router and
> installed it. But I omitted to turn on the second computer (Windows 98)
> before doing so. The Squeezebox is working fine, but I think it usurped
> the IP address of the computer that was not turned on, because with this
> computer I now get the message:
>
> The system has detected a conflict for IP address 192.168.0.3 with the
> system having hardware address 00:0B:DB:BF:44:!E
>
> How can I resolve this mess?

Either disable DHCP on your router and configure all your devices
manually, or change the W98's configuration to use DHCP. Or configure your
DHCP server to attribute always the same IP address to your devices.

--

Michael

-----------------------------------------------------------
Help translate SlimServer by using the
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Phil Karn
2005-03-02, 15:00
Maurice Poirier wrote:
> I have two computers on my network, both connected to a router, itself
> connected to a cable modem (all wired). This morning I turned on the
> server computer (Windows XP), connected the Squeezebox to the router and
> installed it. But I omitted to turn on the second computer (Windows 98)
> before doing so. The Squeezebox is working fine, but I think it usurped
> the IP address of the computer that was not turned on, because with this
> computer I now get the message:
>
> The system has detected a conflict for IP address 192.168.0.3 with the
> system having hardware address 00:0B:DB:BF:44:!E
>
> How can I resolve this mess?
> Many thanks.

The best way is to assign a fixed, static IP address to each host on
your own local network. There's really no point in allocating IP
addresses dynamically to your own hosts given that you have such an
abundant supply of 192.168.0.xxx addresses. Dynamic assignment also
makes it difficult for your hosts to find and talk to each other (unless
they use Apple's Rendezvous). However, it's still useful to keep DHCP
and dynamic addressing around for the benefit of guests with laptops, so
you don't really want to turn it off entirely.

You can do this in several ways:

If you have a typical small home router box with DHCP support (e.g.,
Linksys, Netgear, D-Link, SMC), it will generally let you specify the
range of addresses that it will allocate dynamically. Allocate a
reasonable number of addresses in your subnet to the dynamic pool for
visitors, and make static assignments to each of your own hosts that are
outside the range of this pool in the remainder of the subnet. You will
have to turn off DHCP and manually configure the IP address on each of
your own hosts, though; if they use DHCP, they'll still get a dynamic
address out of the dynamic pool.

If you have a more sophisticated DHCP server, e.g., if you're running
one on a general purpose Linux, UNIX or OS X box, then you can probably
enter the individual Ethernet MAC addresses of each host into the DHCP
server database and assign each one a fixed IP address. When the device
boots with DHCP, the server will recognize the MAC address and always
assign it the same, fixed IP address. This way you avoid having to
manually (re)configure all of your hosts with IP addresses. If an
unknown MAC address shows up, as from a visitor's laptop, the DHCP
server will fall back to giving it one out of the dynamic pool.

Phil

Robin Bowes
2005-03-02, 17:17
Phil Karn wrote:
> If you have a typical small home router box with DHCP support (e.g.,
> Linksys, Netgear, D-Link, SMC), it will generally let you specify the
> range of addresses that it will allocate dynamically. Allocate a
> reasonable number of addresses in your subnet to the dynamic pool for
> visitors, and make static assignments to each of your own hosts that are
> outside the range of this pool in the remainder of the subnet. You will
> have to turn off DHCP and manually configure the IP address on each of
> your own hosts, though; if they use DHCP, they'll still get a dynamic
> address out of the dynamic pool.
>
> If you have a more sophisticated DHCP server, e.g., if you're running
> one on a general purpose Linux, UNIX or OS X box, then you can probably
> enter the individual Ethernet MAC addresses of each host into the DHCP
> server database and assign each one a fixed IP address. When the device
> boots with DHCP, the server will recognize the MAC address and always
> assign it the same, fixed IP address. This way you avoid having to
> manually (re)configure all of your hosts with IP addresses. If an
> unknown MAC address shows up, as from a visitor's laptop, the DHCP
> server will fall back to giving it one out of the dynamic pool.

FWIW, all small home router boxes I've used have the facility to "fix"
DHCP leases, ie. always allocated the same IP address to a given MAC
address. Generally speaking, you boot your Pc or whatever and it is
allocated a dynamic address. You then use the router admin tool to "fix"
the address.

R.
--
http://robinbowes.com

Michael Peters
2005-03-02, 17:42
On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 14:00:36 -0800, Phil Karn <karn (AT) ka9q (DOT) net> wrote:

>
> The best way is to assign a fixed, static IP address to each host on
> your own local network. There's really no point in allocating IP
> addresses dynamically to your own hosts given that you have such an
> abundant supply of 192.168.0.xxx addresses. Dynamic assignment also
> makes it difficult for your hosts to find and talk to each other (unless
> they use Apple's Rendezvous). However, it's still useful to keep DHCP
> and dynamic addressing around for the benefit of guests with laptops, so
> you don't really want to turn it off entirely.

The problem is a mis configuration of the dhcp server.
It should not have been assigning IP's in the same range that some are
manually set.

..1 is my router.
I reserver .2 through .10 for utility purposes (print server, local
yum server, dmz machine, caching name server, etc. - some of those are
actually same box, but done through multihoming so I can seperate them
in future if I need to)

11 through 99 I reserve for static IP's when needed.
When something requests an IP - it gets one from the 100 to 149 range
- 50 dhcp addresses are far far far more than I'll ever use.

150 through 254 I just do not use, and probably never will.

But that was the problem - something was assinged an IP address that
was in use in the static range. My squeezebox will most certainly be
dhcp, it has no need to be static. My slimserver currently is on my
main box (.11) but is likely in the near future to be moved to a
shuttle, where it will get a utility IP address.

Using dhcp is fine as long as you have no need to talk to the box from
another, and as long as your static IP's are not in the range the dhcp
server controls.

--
http://mpeters.us/

Jay Sissom
2005-03-02, 17:43
I have a linksys WRT54G. Can you tell me how to do this? I can find
no setting to allow this in the WRT54G.

Thanks
Jay


On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 00:17:23 +0000, Robin Bowes
<robin-lists (AT) robinbowes (DOT) com> wrote:
>
> FWIW, all small home router boxes I've used have the facility to "fix"
> DHCP leases, ie. always allocated the same IP address to a given MAC
> address. Generally speaking, you boot your Pc or whatever and it is
> allocated a dynamic address. You then use the router admin tool to "fix"
> the address.
>
> R.
> --

Michael Peters
2005-03-02, 17:51
On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 19:43:34 -0500, Jay Sissom <jsissom (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
> I have a linksys WRT54G. Can you tell me how to do this? I can find
> no setting to allow this in the WRT54G.

I also have that router.
The default lease time is a day.

Go to Setup - Basis Setup

Scroll down to DHCP Server

set the lease time value to 0 (that will reserve an IP for the same
machine for 24 hours)
Set the starting IP address to something like 192.168.1.100 - and only
use values below 100 for your local machines that you want to have a
static IP address.

--
http://mpeters.us/

Jay Sissom
2005-03-02, 22:35
Thanks, but that isn't what I want to do. I want to make the router
always assign a specific IP address based on the Mac address in my
ethernet card. Robin said all the routers he has seen allow this, so
I would like him to explain it for WRT54G. This is one of the most
popular ones out there. I can't find this setting. I'd like to know
where it is hiding.

I know how to change the lease on DHCP and how to assign static
addresses. Both useful tasks, but neither are what I would like to
do.

Thanks for your help
Jay



On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 16:51:06 -0800, Michael Peters <funkyres (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
> On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 19:43:34 -0500, Jay Sissom <jsissom (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
> > I have a linksys WRT54G. Can you tell me how to do this? I can find
> > no setting to allow this in the WRT54G.
>
> I also have that router.
> The default lease time is a day.
>
> Go to Setup - Basis Setup
>
> Scroll down to DHCP Server
>
> set the lease time value to 0 (that will reserve an IP for the same
> machine for 24 hours)
> Set the starting IP address to something like 192.168.1.100 - and only
> use values below 100 for your local machines that you want to have a
> static IP address.
>
> --
> http://mpeters.us/
>

Michael Peters
2005-03-02, 22:51
On Thu, 3 Mar 2005 00:35:12 -0500, Jay Sissom <jsissom (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
> Thanks, but that isn't what I want to do. I want to make the router
> always assign a specific IP address based on the Mac address in my
> ethernet card. Robin said all the routers he has seen allow this, so
> I would like him to explain it for WRT54G. This is one of the most
> popular ones out there. I can't find this setting. I'd like to know
> where it is hiding.
>
> I know how to change the lease on DHCP and how to assign static
> addresses. Both useful tasks, but neither are what I would like to
> do.

Having the dhcp server assign the same IP based with an infinite lease
based upon the mac address is no different than a static IP address.
You could try putting in a very large number of minutes for the lease
time - or see if there is a firmware that will do that (imho it should
have the option)

Try 50000 in the lease time (over a month) and see if that does it for you.

--
http://mpeters.us/

Tom
2005-03-02, 23:00
Jay Sissom wrote:
> Thanks, but that isn't what I want to do. I want to make the router
> always assign a specific IP address based on the Mac address in my
> ethernet card. Robin said all the routers he has seen allow this, so
> I would like him to explain it for WRT54G. This is one of the most
> popular ones out there. I can't find this setting. I'd like to know
> where it is hiding.
>
> I know how to change the lease on DHCP and how to assign static
> addresses. Both useful tasks, but neither are what I would like to
> do.
>
> Thanks for your help
> Jay
>
>
>
> On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 16:51:06 -0800, Michael Peters <funkyres (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 19:43:34 -0500, Jay Sissom <jsissom (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
>>
>>>I have a linksys WRT54G. Can you tell me how to do this? I can find
>>>no setting to allow this in the WRT54G.
>>
>>I also have that router.
>>The default lease time is a day.
>>
>>Go to Setup - Basis Setup
>>
>>Scroll down to DHCP Server
>>
>>set the lease time value to 0 (that will reserve an IP for the same
>>machine for 24 hours)
>>Set the starting IP address to something like 192.168.1.100 - and only
>>use values below 100 for your local machines that you want to have a
>>static IP address.
>>
>>--
>>http://mpeters.us/
>>

Michael Peters
2005-03-03, 01:31
>
> Not sure if you're running the Sveasoft firmware, but if you are
> adding an entry like "10.0.0.3 00:04:20:05:91:BF sbox" to the 'Dhcpd'
> section of the 'Management' section under 'Administration' on the
> web interface will do what you are asking.

I have no such section (stock, 3.03.1 firmware)

There's a management section administration.
It has

(Password)
Local Router Access
Web Access
Remote Router Access

(UPnP)

That's it. On mine anyway.


--
http://mpeters.us/

Robin Bowes
2005-03-03, 01:51
Jay Sissom wrote:
> I have a linksys WRT54G. Can you tell me how to do this? I can find
> no setting to allow this in the WRT54G.

Jay,

I too have a WRT54G.

Two problems:

1. I don't have access to it at the moment - I have given it to my Mum!
2. I use the Sveasoft firmware, so this may be different to the stock
Linksys firmware

I'm moving house at the weekend back in with my Mum temporarily so will
have access to the WRT54G next week.

Drop me a reminder next week and I'll have a look for you.

R.
--
http://robinbowes.com

Chip Hart
2005-03-03, 06:50
Robin Bowes wrote:
> 1. I don't have access to it at the moment - I have given it to my Mum!
> 2. I use the Sveasoft firmware, so this may be different to the stock
> Linksys firmware

According to my harried experience this week, the WRT54G does
*not* do static addressing with the standard firmware.

I, too, wanted to assign addresses from the router (rather than
from within each OS) and although the WRT54G menus imply that
this works, it doesn't - at least as far as I could tell.
I could have easily made a mistake, but assigning a MAC address
to a desired address left me with the first available one in the
dynamic range each time. Yes, I made sure to assign IPs outside
the dynamic range.


[In my efforts to get a newer firmware that allows this feature,
I apparently bricked my router. Sigh.]

--
Chip Hart - Marketing * Physician's Computer Company
chip @ pcc.com * 1 Main St. #7, Winooski, VT 05404
800-722-7708 * http://www.pcc.com/~chip
f.802-846-8178 * Pediatric Software Just Got Smarter
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