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Jason
2005-02-27, 07:42
While many folks won't bat an eye at spending $1000 on 70 new CDs or spend
$1500 on a new set of speakers, as soon as you start trying to put together
a storage solution for them that costs more than a few hundred dollars they
start to flip out.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com] On Behalf Of Phil Karn
> Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2005 6:15 AM
> To: Slim Devices Discussion
> Subject: [slim] Need advice on housing 30K of songs
>
> Chris May wrote:
> > Can anyone give me any tips on dealing with 30k or so worth
> of songs?
> >
> > I have a client who has a HUGE CD collection and wants to take the
> > cream of the crop and put them on a 250gig or 300gig HD for his
> > listening pleasure.
>
> I only discovered the Squeezebox a few months ago. My boss
> got one and began raving about it, and it's pretty rare for
> him to say nice things about *any* product. So I got one (a
> second is now on order), and it prompted me to get finally
> serious about the home audio server I've always wanted to build.
>
> I already had a Linux box acting as a server for the house,
> which I was already planning to expand, so I just added a few
> more drives. The main Linux file systems reside on a software
> RAID-1 array of two 250GB IDE drives. I perform monthly
> backups by the simple expedient of removing one drive every
> month and replacing it with a new drive or an old recycled
> backup and letting the mirror rebuild automatically. This
> gives me a complete bootable backup image of my system for no
> more downtime than it takes to power down, swap the drives
> (it's in a removable caddy) and reboot. I *highly* recommend
> this arrangement for any system that can hold two hard
> drives. Tape is utterly obsolete as a backup medium, and DVDs
> are also too slow and small. The only way to back up today's
> hard drives are onto more hard drives.
>
> Large, relatively static databases like music and personal
> photo collections reside on six 300 GB SATA drives in a
> RAID-5 configuration:
> 4 data drives, 1 parity drive and one online spare. I
> strongly recommend SATA if you're going to have this many
> drives in one box, as the cabling would otherwise be a mess.
> Each drive is split into 50GB partitions, so four data
> partitions joined in RAID-5 will produce a 200 GB virtual
> file system. This is a manageable size for rsync backups onto
> external hard drives that I keep off site or in a safe, as my
> drive rotation scheme won't work for RAID-5. I currently use
> two of those 200GB RAID-5 file systems for the slimserver
> music archive (currently 15,567 songs).
>
> I rip all my CDs in FLAC format and keep them in a storage
> facility as an off site backup, somewhat less vulnerable to
> burglary. With hard disks now so roomy and cheap, I saw no
> reason to use any other format, at least not for my master
> archive. The extra disk cost was minimal, less than the value
> of my time ripping all my CDs again. (I'd already ripped many
> of them before into MP3 or Ogg, and I don't want to ever have
> to rip them again.) We'll use MP3, Ogg or AAC, produced from
> the FLAC versions, only for secondary copies in iPods,
> laptops and car players.
>
> Phil
>

Phil Karn
2005-02-28, 01:44
Jason wrote:
> While many folks won't bat an eye at spending $1000 on 70 new CDs or spend
> $1500 on a new set of speakers, as soon as you start trying to put together
> a storage solution for them that costs more than a few hundred dollars they
> start to flip out.

Why? I use the Linux box that contains my music server for lots of other
things besides serving music. Just being able to box up and move all my
CDs to storage and free up some space in the living room was more than
worth it!