PDA

View Full Version : Why didn't they buy a SqueezeBox?



Gregory Forrest
2005-02-22, 21:32
It seems that many people are having problems with 802.11b coverage. What
kind of equipment are you all running for your access points? Many
consumers don't realize that there are major and significant differences in
the range performance between various access point manufacturers. One key
rule in wireless - you get what you pay for. Keep in mind that most
Linksys, Netgear, Belkin, etc. consumer-grade units have transmit power
levels of about 30 milliwatts, and need a signal at their receiver of
about -82 dBm in the reverse direction for adequate performance. But you
can purchase AP's for about $120 that provide 200 milliwatts and only
need -91 dBm of received signal levels. These can provide four-times the
range, or much higher reliability on short paths. The high transmit power
can also help overcome interference (i.e., Microwwave ovens).

If you are interested in reliable service and range, consider some of the
high-power Senao and Cisco products. I have no financial interest in this
recommendation - I just own a few.

Greg

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com]On Behalf Of Russell
> Mulcahy
> Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 15:09
> To: Slim Devices Discussion
> Subject: [slim] Why didn't they buy a SqueezeBox?
>
>
> FWIW, My SB works fine on 11b, until the microwave goes on, when it
> stops dead!
>
> Dodgy microwave, I guess!
>
> Russell.
>
> Yan Tran wrote:
>
> >Just how much interference does a microwave cause? How close to
> >wireless router or an SB does a microwave have to be in order for
> >their to be noticeable noise? I've operated 802.11b devices within a
> >10 foot radius of a microwave without noticing signal degradation.
> >(Now I'll have to put my SB next to a microwave to find out)
> >
> >You can get signal loss with 10Base-T if for some reason you decide to
> >use a cable that's over 328 feet long, but that's a pretty extreme
> >case for most of us.
> >
> >Yan
> >
> >
> >
>
>

Jeff Allison
2005-02-23, 08:37
Gregory Forrest wrote:
> It seems that many people are having problems with 802.11b coverage. What
> kind of equipment are you all running for your access points? Many
> consumers don't realize that there are major and significant differences in
> the range performance between various access point manufacturers. One key
> rule in wireless - you get what you pay for. Keep in mind that most
> Linksys, Netgear, Belkin, etc. consumer-grade units have transmit power
> levels of about 30 milliwatts, and need a signal at their receiver of
> about -82 dBm in the reverse direction for adequate performance. But you
> can purchase AP's for about $120 that provide 200 milliwatts and only
> need -91 dBm of received signal levels. These can provide four-times the
> range, or much higher reliability on short paths. The high transmit power
> can also help overcome interference (i.e., Microwwave ovens).

I don't know about the specs, but I can throw in some anecdotal evidence
on the behavior of different APs. I used to run a Netgear AP that
suffered tremendously from noise. It couldn't deal with the microwave
at all, and the 2.4Ghz phone was just as bad. When I replaced the
Netgear with an SMC Barricade I found the interference problems just
went away. To be fair, we use a 5.8 Ghz phone most of the time now, but
we have the same microwave and it's no problem.

So in my particular environment there was a definite difference in
behavior with different AP's. I still get the occasional dropout on the
SB, but I'm not so sure that's a network problem.

- Jeff

> If you are interested in reliable service and range, consider some of the
> high-power Senao and Cisco products. I have no financial interest in this
> recommendation - I just own a few.

> Greg

Aaron Zinck
2005-02-23, 09:25
"Jeff Allison" wrote
> Gregory Forrest wrote:
> > It seems that many people are having problems with 802.11b coverage.
What
> > kind of equipment are you all running for your access points? Many
> > consumers don't realize that there are major and significant differences
in
> > the range performance between various access point manufacturers. One
key
> > rule in wireless - you get what you pay for. Keep in mind that most
> > Linksys, Netgear, Belkin, etc. consumer-grade units have transmit power
> > levels of about 30 milliwatts, and need a signal at their receiver of
> > about -82 dBm in the reverse direction for adequate performance. But
you
> > can purchase AP's for about $120 that provide 200 milliwatts and only
> > need -91 dBm of received signal levels. These can provide four-times
the
> > range, or much higher reliability on short paths. The high transmit
power
> > can also help overcome interference (i.e., Microwwave ovens).
>
> I don't know about the specs, but I can throw in some anecdotal evidence
> on the behavior of different APs. I used to run a Netgear AP that
> suffered tremendously from noise. It couldn't deal with the microwave
> at all, and the 2.4Ghz phone was just as bad. When I replaced the
> Netgear with an SMC Barricade I found the interference problems just
> went away. To be fair, we use a 5.8 Ghz phone most of the time now, but
> we have the same microwave and it's no problem.
>
> So in my particular environment there was a definite difference in
> behavior with different AP's. I still get the occasional dropout on the
> SB, but I'm not so sure that's a network problem.
>
> - Jeff
>

Perhaps the two AP's had different default channels set? If you never tried
adjusting the channels for best coverage then different default channels
would potentially explain this dramatic difference in performance.