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fcm4711
2005-02-13, 07:15
Hi Mark

I am not sure, but I think there are Audio CDs
out there, where all songs are on the CD twice.
A regular version and a special copy protected
version that is presented to when you open the CD
with Window Media Player. The regular version
is 'hidden' and needs special programs to get
off the CD. I guess EAC is one of these programs.

Luckily most of the copy protection mechanism
only work properly on Windows so the Mac I
use to rip my CDs is not triggered by it and
rips 'Un'-CDs like nothing had happend.

I only noticed that the last CD I ripped was
copy protected after I was already listen to
it on my Sqeezebox and I was studying the
booklet. :)

Felix



--- kdf <slim-mail (AT) deane-freeman (DOT) com> wrote:

> Quoting Mark Graham <graham_mark (AT) sbcglobal (DOT) net>:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I downloaded a couple of CD's onto my harddrive
> (Velvet Revolver and
> > Silvertide) and were able to listen to them by
> either using the CD or
> > directly through the hard drive but they wouldn't
> play thru the slimserver.
> > When looking at each song thru the slimserver it
> stated that the songs were
> > protected by digital rights mangagement.
> >
> > I thought I would delete the folders from the hard
> drive and attempt to
> > download them again and this time the CD didn't
> open and go to the internet
> > for the codes. It wouldn't do anything.
> >
> > Both of these CD's are originals. Just to review
> both CD's at first played
> > either with the CD inserted or thru the hard drive
> after receiving the codes
> > from the internet. After reinstalling them they
> both seem to be dead.
> >
> > Has anyone ran into this and are there any
> solutions to this?
>
> I'm not completely following what you have done
> here. Have you downloaded songs
> from an online store or taken files from a store
> bought cd? Depending on the
> store, the files may be protected by Digital Rights
> Management, which means you
> are only able to play the song in a format and
> location of the record company's
> choosing. Slimserver is not one of those formats.
> You would have to burn your
> downloaded songs to a blank CDR then rip those
> tracks back onto your hard
> drive.
>
> if you have ripped from a CD, what program did you
> use? I've found that EAC is
> fairly good at getting clean tracks off any CD.
>
> regardless, copy protected so-called CD's are a bad
> thing.
>
> -kdf
>

Patrick Dowling
2005-02-13, 08:00
That is the case for Velvet Revolver. A friend of mine has it and
couldn't get it to work on Win XP but I was able to rip for him on Mac
OS X, So if you know someone with a Mac or possibly Linux you can get
around the DRM.

Pat

On Feb 13, 2005, at 8:15 AM, Felix Mueller wrote:

> Hi Mark
>
> I am not sure, but I think there are Audio CDs
> out there, where all songs are on the CD twice.
> A regular version and a special copy protected
> version that is presented to when you open the CD
> with Window Media Player. The regular version
> is 'hidden' and needs special programs to get
> off the CD. I guess EAC is one of these programs.
>
> Luckily most of the copy protection mechanism
> only work properly on Windows so the Mac I
> use to rip my CDs is not triggered by it and
> rips 'Un'-CDs like nothing had happend.
>
> I only noticed that the last CD I ripped was
> copy protected after I was already listen to
> it on my Sqeezebox and I was studying the
> booklet. :)
>
> Felix
>
>
>
> --- kdf <slim-mail (AT) deane-freeman (DOT) com> wrote:
>
>> Quoting Mark Graham <graham_mark (AT) sbcglobal (DOT) net>:
>>
>>> Hi all,
>>>
>>> I downloaded a couple of CD's onto my harddrive
>> (Velvet Revolver and
>>> Silvertide) and were able to listen to them by
>> either using the CD or
>>> directly through the hard drive but they wouldn't
>> play thru the slimserver.
>>> When looking at each song thru the slimserver it
>> stated that the songs were
>>> protected by digital rights mangagement.
>>>
>>> I thought I would delete the folders from the hard
>> drive and attempt to
>>> download them again and this time the CD didn't
>> open and go to the internet
>>> for the codes. It wouldn't do anything.
>>>
>>> Both of these CD's are originals. Just to review
>> both CD's at first played
>>> either with the CD inserted or thru the hard drive
>> after receiving the codes
>>> from the internet. After reinstalling them they
>> both seem to be dead.
>>>
>>> Has anyone ran into this and are there any
>> solutions to this?
>>
>> I'm not completely following what you have done
>> here. Have you downloaded songs
>> from an online store or taken files from a store
>> bought cd? Depending on the
>> store, the files may be protected by Digital Rights
>> Management, which means you
>> are only able to play the song in a format and
>> location of the record company's
>> choosing. Slimserver is not one of those formats.
>> You would have to burn your
>> downloaded songs to a blank CDR then rip those
>> tracks back onto your hard
>> drive.
>>
>> if you have ripped from a CD, what program did you
>> use? I've found that EAC is
>> fairly good at getting clean tracks off any CD.
>>
>> regardless, copy protected so-called CD's are a bad
>> thing.
>>
>> -kdf
>>

Marc Sherman
2005-02-13, 08:34
Patrick Dowling wrote:
> That is the case for Velvet Revolver. A friend of mine has it and
> couldn't get it to work on Win XP but I was able to rip for him on Mac
> OS X, So if you know someone with a Mac or possibly Linux you can get
> around the DRM.

Or you could just return it to the store where you bought it, and tell
them that you thought you were buying a red-book CD, but that's not what
you got. Vote against DRM with your wallet.

- Marc

Simon Still
2005-02-13, 09:28
The other thing to do is to try a few different apps to rip the CD.
The first album by the Kings of Leon was copy protected in the UK but
about 50% of the time Windows iTunes will allow it to be ripped.
Exact Audio Copy sometimes also works around certain sorts of copy
protection. The most important thing is not to let autorun do it's
stuff.

Harm Reitsma
2005-02-13, 10:02
Last friday I bought the CD of Amos Lee.............with "copy
controlled" from EMI. I tried about everything (shift, iTunes, EAC, Nero
6.0, Audiograbber, Isobuster) but I couldn't get rid of the sharp
electronic beebs once every 20-30 seconds. I got very frustrated and
decided to go back to the shop I bought the CD. I expected trouble but
interestingly enough I experienced the contrary. No discussion at all,
the shop offered me to order a new (non copy controlled) CD from Amos
Lee. It really made me suspect that EMI uses copy control but that they
probably think they can not legally defend so if a customer complains he
gets a non copied control CD without any hassle. Anybody the same
experience?


Simon Still wrote:

>The other thing to do is to try a few different apps to rip the CD.
>The first album by the Kings of Leon was copy protected in the UK but
>about 50% of the time Windows iTunes will allow it to be ripped.
>Exact Audio Copy sometimes also works around certain sorts of copy
>protection. The most important thing is not to let autorun do it's
>stuff.
>

Simon Still
2005-02-13, 12:06
On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 18:02:43 +0100, Harm Reitsma <harm.reitsma (AT) gmail (DOT) com> wrote:
>Anybody the same
> experience?

The Blue Nile's most recent album went to the pressing plant with some
kind of studio protection applied. The record company sent out newly
pressed CD's without question - I actually ended up with two copies as
i emailed and, when i hadnt had a reply, phoned. They werent even
asking for any proof of purchase.

Mark Graham
2005-02-13, 20:02
Hi all,

I got the 2 DRM disks working. I use musicmatch and had to open the music
files from the music disk. I then burnt these files to a blank CD-R. Then
copied them from the burnt CD to the harddrive where the music files are
stored. The slimserver software then read all the music with no problems.
No DRM protection was detected. I believe kdf mentioned something about
this in his post.
I also wrote to the group that deals with the DRM and BMG stating my thought
about all of this crap.

Thanks

Mark Graham
-------Original Message-------

From: Slim Devices Discussion
Date: 02/13/05 13:06:49
To: Slim Devices Discussion
Subject: [slim] Issues with Digital Rights Management and slimserver

On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 18:02:43 +0100, Harm Reitsma <harm.reitsma (AT) gmail (DOT) com>
wrote:
>Anybody the same
> experience?

The Blue Nile's most recent album went to the pressing plant with some
kind of studio protection applied. The record company sent out newly
pressed CD's without question - I actually ended up with two copies as
i emailed and, when i hadnt had a reply, phoned. They werent even
asking for any proof of purchase.

Damon Riley
2005-02-14, 10:36
I read below where you got your cd's burnt and were then able to move
the files to your slimserver. So what is the DRM for, I wonder, if it's
so easy to circumvent? I agree with Marc wholeheartedly and wanted to
say "Amen" to returning DRM'd CDs. I'd rather not have the music under
those conditions.

Also, haven't you violated the Digital Millenium Copyright Act by
outwitting the DRM? Better get an iPod to take to prison with you-- I
doubt they'd let your server in the door.

-- Damon

Marc Sherman wrote:
> Patrick Dowling wrote:
>
>> That is the case for Velvet Revolver. A friend of mine has it and
>> couldn't get it to work on Win XP but I was able to rip for him on Mac
>> OS X, So if you know someone with a Mac or possibly Linux you can get
>> around the DRM.
>
>
> Or you could just return it to the store where you bought it, and tell
> them that you thought you were buying a red-book CD, but that's not what
> you got. Vote against DRM with your wallet.
>
> - Marc
>
>