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Roy Owen
2005-01-07, 07:39
I've been experiencing signal loss problems with a wireless SB I think
that if I can replace the antenna with one with higher gain it would
solve my problems. Anybody have any experience with 3rd party
antennea?

Thanks
Roy Owen
--
Do meddle in the affairs of Dragons,
for you are crunchy and good with Tabasco.

Stephen Ward
2005-01-07, 08:25
Roy --

I installed a D-Link DWL-M60AT 6dBi Directional Antenna on my
Squeezebox...

<http://tinyurl.com/27ag5>

....a while back -- and it boosted the signal strength quite
considerably. It now hovers between 50% and 60% (two floors apart);
when originally it never reached 30%! (I was only having the odd
network-related drop-out before; but this has done enough, in my case,
to rid me of them completely... -- mind you, we hardly ever use the
microwave; and the wireless network is hardly used for anything else
than streaming music... ;-).

I also tried modding an original AirPort base station with an external
antenna; but the signal increase was only minor.

Hope this helps...

- $.

Stephen R Ward
<srward (AT) srward (DOT) com>


On 7 Jan 2005, at 14:39, Roy Owen wrote:

> I've been experiencing signal loss problems with a wireless SB I think
> that if I can replace the antenna with one with higher gain it would
> solve my problems. Anybody have any experience with 3rd party
> antennea?

Jeff Shanholtz
2005-01-11, 17:00
On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 09:39:39 -0500, Roy Owen wrote:

> I've been experiencing signal loss problems with a wireless SB I think
> that if I can replace the antenna with one with higher gain it would
> solve my problems. Anybody have any experience with 3rd party
> antennea?

I just discovered a design for a quick, cheap, and effective parabolic
reflector that not only will supposedly give you 10 to 12 dB of gain but
will help increase your wireless LAN's privacy (i.e. contain it within your
house rather than transmitting beyond your property, which was actually the
primary objective of the design). It's so quick and easy, it's worth a try
before you go out and buy new antennas.

http://www.freeantennas.com/projects/template/

Marc Sherman
2005-01-12, 10:29
Jeff Shanholtz wrote:
> I just discovered a design for a quick, cheap, and effective parabolic
> reflector that not only will supposedly give you 10 to 12 dB of gain but
> will help increase your wireless LAN's privacy (i.e. contain it within your
> house rather than transmitting beyond your property, which was actually the
> primary objective of the design). It's so quick and easy, it's worth a try
> before you go out and buy new antennas.

[Sorry for taking this so off-topic!]

Do these designs work as well if you put them on your client devices but
not on the WAP? I've got a WAP in the basement near the back of my
house, and three clients: a squeezebox on the main floor in the middle
of the house, a laptop that's usually in the back on the main floor but
sometimes moves around, particularly to the front of the basement (on
the other side of the furnace), and a desktop pretty much directly above
the squeezebox.

2nd floor: | D |
1st floor: |L S |
Basement: | W F L'|

My concern is that if I put a parabolic antenna on the WAP and point it
up so that it includes the laptop in it's normal location and the two
fixed devices, the laptop won't get any reception when it moves to the
basement and is already blocked by the furnace.

My WAP has two antennas (it's a WRT54g), so I could put a parabolic on
one of them and leave the other open -- would the wap use the parabolic
to talk to machines in the arc, and the open antenna to talk to the
laptop when it's in the basement?

- Marc

seanadams
2005-01-12, 11:34
Marc,

You would probably do best by leaving your base station alone and
putting directional antennas only on the client devices.

When an antenna specifies gain, it doesn't exactly mean "makes the
signal stronger" it means "focuses it by this much in a particular
pattern," as compared to a theoretical thing called an "isotropic
radiator" - an antenna that is equally sensitive in all directions.
These don't exist - every antenna has some sensitivity pattern and
needs to be pointed the right way to maximize strength.

A high gain antenna allows you to aim at the access point with more
focus. There's a tradeoff in that you have to have better aim, but if
you do you get a much stronger signal.

Especially if your devices are spread out in three dimensions (not just
on one floor) the factory omnidirectional antennas on the access point
should work best.




On Jan 12, 2005, at 9:29 AM, Marc Sherman wrote:

> Jeff Shanholtz wrote:
>> I just discovered a design for a quick, cheap, and effective parabolic
>> reflector that not only will supposedly give you 10 to 12 dB of gain
>> but
>> will help increase your wireless LAN's privacy (i.e. contain it
>> within your
>> house rather than transmitting beyond your property, which was
>> actually the
>> primary objective of the design). It's so quick and easy, it's worth
>> a try
>> before you go out and buy new antennas.
>
> [Sorry for taking this so off-topic!]
>
> Do these designs work as well if you put them on your client devices
> but not on the WAP? I've got a WAP in the basement near the back of
> my house, and three clients: a squeezebox on the main floor in the
> middle of the house, a laptop that's usually in the back on the main
> floor but sometimes moves around, particularly to the front of the
> basement (on the other side of the furnace), and a desktop pretty much
> directly above the squeezebox.
>
> 2nd floor: | D |
> 1st floor: |L S |
> Basement: | W F L'|
>
> My concern is that if I put a parabolic antenna on the WAP and point
> it up so that it includes the laptop in it's normal location and the
> two fixed devices, the laptop won't get any reception when it moves to
> the basement and is already blocked by the furnace.
>
> My WAP has two antennas (it's a WRT54g), so I could put a parabolic on
> one of them and leave the other open -- would the wap use the
> parabolic to talk to machines in the arc, and the open antenna to talk
> to the laptop when it's in the basement?
>
> - Marc
>