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Redrum
2016-05-14, 12:27
Hi,

I could not find this in a search, so bear with me.

I have four receivers and a touch scattered through the house, with the exception of one in an attached garage. All run fine, with the exception of the occasional "buffering" of the garage receiver, and any other receiver that might be synced with it at the time. It can run fine for hours, but can "rebuffer a few times and recover, or get stuck. Once "stuck", I have to fiddle with start/stop LMS, on/off receiver, or just give up. It seems independent of the bandwidth demands (i.e. 128kbps - 320kbps) radio station to FLAC server files.

I followed toby10's advice: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?104873-Classic-and-receiver-synchronization-issues&highlight=wifi+orientation to try to land on a clean channel.

My WIFI strength hovers around 30-40% despite moving the receiver around in the garage, or changing it's orientation. Before I get into Powerline, or pulling an ethernet cable into the garage I thought I would try to get the wireless strength up a bit. Which leads to my question, I an sure that the receiver's antenna was designed omnidirectional, but most omni antennas have hot lobes, or orientations. Does anyone know if there is a "sweet" orientation with respect to the location of the router?

Thanks
Jim

Mnyb
2016-05-14, 13:00
Have a look at this tread .

http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?100887-Receiver-WiFi-improvement&highlight=Receiver+wi-fi+antenna

callesoroe
2016-05-15, 02:21
Hi,

I could not find this in a search, so bear with me.

I have four receivers and a touch scattered through the house, with the exception of one in an attached garage. All run fine, with the exception of the occasional "buffering" of the garage receiver, and any other receiver that might be synced with it at the time. It can run fine for hours, but can "rebuffer a few times and recover, or get stuck. Once "stuck", I have to fiddle with start/stop LMS, on/off receiver, or just give up. It seems independent of the bandwidth demands (i.e. 128kbps - 320kbps) radio station to FLAC server files.

I followed toby10's advice: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?104873-Classic-and-receiver-synchronization-issues&highlight=wifi+orientation to try to land on a clean channel.

My WIFI strength hovers around 30-40% despite moving the receiver around in the garage, or changing it's orientation. Before I get into Powerline, or pulling an ethernet cable into the garage I thought I would try to get the wireless strength up a bit. Which leads to my question, I an sure that the receiver's antenna was designed omnidirectional, but most omni antennas have hot lobes, or orientations. Does anyone know if there is a "sweet" orientation with respect to the location of the router?

Thanks
Jim

Looks like a wifi problem. 30-40% signal strength is low.... Must be about 50-60 to be considered stable...

Redrum
2016-05-15, 04:31
Mynb - perfect, I'll give it a try, thanks.

Calle - yup, router to the attached garage is about 70' through a house wall (with foil backed insulation), and either a garage wall, or, the aluminum garage door. Hence the crappy (and fluctuating) signal strength. One time I thought I had the perfect location, then closed the garage door...not anymore.

All other receivers/tuoch in the house are ethernet, with the exception of one wifi, whose signal strength is fine.

toby10
2016-05-15, 04:31
Garage have the foil covered insulation in the walls? I've never owned a Duet but I can see where by it's design the WiFi antenna is probably more horizontal oriented? Can you try the Receiver standing on it's side, possibly giving it's antenna a better vertical orientation?

Redrum
2016-05-16, 04:17
Garage have the foil covered insulation in the walls? I've never owned a Duet but I can see where by it's design the WiFi antenna is probably more horizontal oriented? Can you try the Receiver standing on it's side, possibly giving it's antenna a better vertical orientation?

The house wall had foil back foam applied before the vinyl siding (previous owner) presumably for a flat surface and a few extra R's. I am pretty sure the garage is the same way. It doesn't make sense for an unheated space, but they had a wood burner in there that I replaced with an old little stand alone fuel oil heater salvaged from an old farm house (for situational heating, i.e. something is broken). So, perhaps that's why they did it.

I'm also not sure what part the foil adds to the normal signal attenuation of the walls as it's not grounded.

I'll try both the ideas in the link, and yours as well. When I have done this in the past it seems hard to determine if you have done any improvement. If the signal as seen by the receiver in the "settings->advanced->squeezebox information" is a snapshot value, and if it's varying normally at, say 35 - 42% each time you do a check, unless you really hit on something to pop it past, say 50%, it's hard to tell if you have done anything.

Appreciate the help. There is a pull conduit that runs from the basement to the garage, so I can always resort to pulling a 100' ethernet cable, which might be the smart move, but I'll certainly try the ideas above first.

Jim

Redrum
2016-05-16, 04:26
one last thing. I am still running LMS 7.7.5. Not sure any work has been done on the packet handling/buffering area of the server since that release. If there has, perhaps I need to update.

drmatt
2016-05-16, 11:51
I would look at Powerline ethernet connectors in your position. You don't need a high speed link for audio.

Redrum
2016-05-17, 05:09
My original query was if the receiver had an particular "optimal" orientation. Thanks for all your thoughts, the findings for my specific situation:

1) It didn't seem to improve flipping the horizontal plane of the receiver vertically, in any rotation.
2) With the help of a 25' RCA cable I had in my stash, I found a better location for the receiver, which I think the most important part is that I moved it vertically, so that it is on the same horizontal plane as the router. I went from 30-40% to 50-60%. It does vary quite a bit for each "reading".
3) I did not try the mods in the link yet.

I'm going to see how this does with regard to data streaming reliability (buffering). I know I have options such as powerline, but probably the best option is you can get a 100' ethernet cable for <$15 and pull it.

Something else but on topic, Through squeezebox information, I can only get a snapshot of the signal strength. Has anyone, through a SB app, or, say SqueezeCntrl (which I use) or similar, created a "live" display of the % that the SB sees? Just curious. It seems like it would be useful for tricky positioning.

Jim

drmatt
2016-05-17, 05:41
Something else but on topic, Through squeezebox information, I can only get a snapshot of the signal strength. Has anyone, through a SB app, or, say SqueezeCntrl (which I use) or similar, created a "live" display of the % that the SB sees? Just curious. It seems like it would be useful for tricky positioning.


Yes I appreciate there are off-topic responses.. but here's one on-topic. Yes you can:

NC=/bin/netcat
HOST=<LMS server name>
PORT=<LMS server port>

COUNT=$(printf "%b" "player count ?\nexit\n" | $NC $HOST $PORT | cut -d " " -f 3)
(( COUNT-- ))
for ID in $(seq 0 $COUNT); do
MAC=$(printf "%b" "player id $ID ?\nexit\n" | $NC $HOST $PORT | cut -d " " -f 4 | sed 's/%3A/:/g')
VAL=$(printf "%b" "$MAC signalstrength ?\nexit\n"| $NC $HOST $PORT | cut -d " " -f 2- | sed "s/$CMD //")
MAC2=$(echo $MAC| sed 's/://g')
echo "$MAC2.value $VAL"
done


This, or something like this, will get a list of players indexed by MAC address and print out the signal strength reported by each.

E.g.
00042017f9c8.value 0
0004202314aa.value 68
00042022d970.value 0
00042016e5d5.value 0
000420263bcd.value 100

Assuming, of course, that you have a Linux machine to run it on.

RonM
2016-05-17, 05:42
Although it would require more outlay, you could try an upgraded router. I had some problems with a series of basic and better routers - the router is in the basement along with my music server, and the signal to the deck off the main floor is on the other side of the house (farthest possible location). Signal had to go through many walls and was always iffy.

I upgraded to an Asus RT-N66U (branded as "Dark Knight", weirdly), which is a robust dual-band router. I mostly don't use the 5 ghz band, but sometimes do for devices that support it, but it's mostly used on standard 2.4ghz. There are other similar high-end routers. The Asus is selling for under $100 on Amazon US.

This completely solved the problem. Signal strength is significantly higher than the other routers I'd tried, and I didn't have to fiddle with Ethernet cables (only Transporter is on Ethernet, through a small hole in the floor behind it, which goes directly to the basement room with the router). It works even through a solid concrete wall from the basement location into the garage and well beyond into the yard. Good for mobiles.

Redrum
2016-05-17, 12:50
Assuming, of course, that you have a Linux machine to run it on.

Thank you for the input, but alas, not a Linux guy yet, maybe someday




I upgraded to an Asus RT-N66U (branded as "Dark Knight", weirdly), which is a robust dual-band router.

Thank you. I have been meaning to buy that exact same router, as my dad and a friend love theirs. So I pulled the trigger on "amazon warehouse deals" for $68. I have has real good luck with their repackages stuff, as long as you don't mind occasionally returning things for missing parts, or something. Most of the time the box has been opened and the merchandise is untouched.

I have a modem/router because of DSL, so I'll have to configure to split that to use the external modem, but that shouldn't be hard.

Thanks everyone for your input, it's been fun. I use my SB's constantly and still find myself smiling at how it has change the way I listen to music, and what I listen to as well.

Jim