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rrgmrg
2015-10-08, 17:59
My Transporter died after 6 years. I missed it so much I shelled out 750 for a NIB black with knob on EBay. When this one goes I suspect there won't be any more around. Forgive me if this has already been discussed, but why did Logitech give up on it or at the very least, why wasn't it picked up by another company? Such great form and function and I suspect a hefty profit margin as well.

Thanks,

Randy

JJZolx
2015-10-08, 20:15
To be honest, the Transporter was an inside joke by Sean Adams, who chuckled under his breath at audiophiles and the little rarefied world that they live in. He designed a very nice sounding device, and gave it an arbitrary price tag. ("Hey Tony, how does $1000 sound? That's expensive, right?" "Nah, why don't you make it $2000?" "Sure. What the hell.")

Transporter was never where Logitech wanted to take the product line. They were hoping for something more mainstream, but could never quite make that happen financially. If they could have sold a device for $99, then Squeezebox might still be alive. Unfortunately, they inherited (bought, actually) an ecosystem that was extremely expensive to maintain, and way more rickety than they'd hoped.

Forensically, their problem was that they hired a lot of guys who understood the hardware, audio and networking sides of things, but they pretty thoroughly fucked up the data modeling and (to a lesser extent) the user interface. If Logitech had immediately made the decision to port the software to a native Windows application and knocked out a device for $99, I guarantee the Squeezebox would still be alive today.

SuperQ
2015-10-08, 22:49
That's a lot of faith in Logitech management. I bought a harmony remote on the premise that I could manually tweak config files, and it had a good, if windows-based UI for configuration. Then they made this completely shit wizard-based abomination that was nearly force-upgraded upon me. I still regret buying into the harmony remotes, but the behavior of the company has convinced me they can't get anything besides mice done correctly. And even those have issuse, like my wireless mouse at work still can't correctly report the battery status of a NiMh battery.

rrgmrg
2015-10-08, 22:58
To be honest, the Transporter was an inside joke by Sean Adams,

I totally agree that it was way overpriced, but for an "inside joke" it's an awesome and innovative product, so much so that I overpaid a second time. Works great, sounds great and looks awesome in my rack.

callesoroe
2015-10-09, 02:17
To be honest, the Transporter was an inside joke by Sean Adams, who chuckled under his breath at audiophiles and the little rarefied world that they live in. He designed a very nice sounding device, and gave it an arbitrary price tag. ("Hey Tony, how does $1000 sound? That's expensive, right?" "Nah, why don't you make it $2000?" "Sure. What the hell.")

Transporter was never where Logitech wanted to take the product line. They were hoping for something more mainstream, but could never quite make that happen financially. If they could have sold a device for $99, then Squeezebox might still be alive. Unfortunately, they inherited (bought, actually) an ecosystem that was extremely expensive to maintain, and way more rickety than they'd hoped.

Forensically, their problem was that they hired a lot of guys who understood the hardware, audio and networking sides of things, but they pretty thoroughly fucked up the data modeling and (to a lesser extent) the user interface. If Logitech had immediately made the decision to port the software to a native Windows application and knocked out a device for $99, I guarantee the Squeezebox would still be alive today.

It was not overpriced. It is worth every penny. Design, build quality, components, and sound quality all top. So the price is OK.

cliveb
2015-10-09, 08:02
Unfortunately, they inherited (bought, actually) an ecosystem that was extremely expensive to maintain, and way more rickety than they'd hoped.
Funny that. I've never had any reliability problems with any version of SlimServer/SqueezeCenter/LMS. I've run various incarnations on FreeBSD, Win2000, Ubuntu and Fedora. It always just worked. So I can't understand where you get your idea of "rickety" from.

Or perhaps you're speaking in terms of the development and support effort required. I guess that's possible, but I don't have any inside knowledge of what their software guys had to deal with.


Forensically, their problem was that they hired a lot of guys who understood the hardware, audio and networking sides of things, but they pretty thoroughly fucked up the data modeling and (to a lesser extent) the user interface.
Seems to me that what Logitech actually did was see that there might be money to be made from the streaming audio market, and so took a punt on buying a semi-mature technology to try and enter that marketplace. It only cost what for them was petty cash.

Unfortunately they never understood the Slim Devices vision so had no idea where to take things. Everyone seems to think that in hardware terms the Touch was the crowning glory, but it was the beginning of the end - a "non-slim Slim Device", as it were. By trying to put some of the intelligence into the player, they completely missed the point of how the ecosystem was supposed to work. Luckily for customers who did understand the system, they could ignore the cut-down server they tried to put on the Touch and just use it as a player. But it was presented to the mass market as an all-in-one solution, and that just didn't work.

What Logitech should have done is release some sort of LMS appliance so they could sell a turnkey server and stick with genuinely slim players. If they couldn't even figure out how to do that, they could have bought Vortexbox for much less than they paid for Slim Devices.


If Logitech had immediately made the decision to port the software to a native Windows application and knocked out a device for $99, I guarantee the Squeezebox would still be alive today.
Perhaps something would still be alive, but it wouldn't be much like the Squeezebox system we know and love.

netchord
2015-10-09, 11:07
i have two, one of which i use via its digital output to a Meridian G61. i could use a touch for the same purpose, but the transporter looks so much cooler.

i paid $1300 for one, and $600 for the other, several years apart. the average seems about right, and it sounds fabulous via its analog outputs in my main rig.

SamS
2015-10-11, 13:01
I have two now, bought a spare NIB via eBay for about $500. Cheap insurance for when one eventually gives up the ghost.

Greg Erskine
2015-10-11, 13:27
My Transporter died after 6 years. I missed it so much I shelled out 750 for a NIB black with knob on EBay. When this one goes I suspect there won't be any more around. Forgive me if this has already been discussed, but why did Logitech give up on it or at the very least, why wasn't it picked up by another company? Such great form and function and I suspect a hefty profit margin as well.

Thanks,

Randy

Hi Randy,

There is a thread here discussing replacing failed Transporter PSUs.

Maybe you can bring it back to life?

regards
Greg

rrgmrg
2015-10-13, 07:58
Hi Randy,

There is a thread here discussing replacing failed Transporter PSUs.

Maybe you can bring it back to life?

regards
Greg

Thank you Greg. I'm afraid I already sent it to E Waste. Probably should have kept it for parts and pursued a repair, it would have been nice to have a backup.

Randy

riffer
2015-10-15, 14:07
Thank you Greg. I'm afraid I already sent it to E Waste. Probably should have kept it for parts and pursued a repair, it would have been nice to have a backup.

Randy

Ouch!!

People would have bought it just for a working display and the knob.

BJW
2015-10-19, 02:44
If they could have sold a device for $99, then Squeezebox might still be alive. Unfortunately, they inherited (bought, actually) an ecosystem that was extremely expensive to maintain, and way more rickety than they'd hoped.

If Logitech had immediately made the decision to port the software to a native Windows application and knocked out a device for $99, I guarantee the Squeezebox would still be alive today.

totally agree! i believe had the first SB used a native audio driver for windows, that would have been huge.

and it never "just worked" for me. in fact, i blame it for killing several HDs before i realized there was some kind of conflict between Server and windows defender, and thats just one of many issues i had.

i consider my whole exp with this stuff to be an education, but its not something i think has much of a future or much appeal to anyone else these days.

cliveb
2015-10-19, 07:24
totally agree! i believe had the first SB used a native audio driver for windows, that would have been huge.
Comments like this just go to show how badly some people misunderstand the Squeezebox ecosystem.

None of the Squeezebox players were ever Windows devices, and the server software isn't an audio application - it sends packets of data via TCP/IP to the players. You can run the server on a machine without any audio devices at all. So where would a "native audio driver for Windows" fit?

Mnyb
2015-10-19, 09:56
Comments like this just go to show how badly some people misunderstand the Squeezebox ecosystem.

None of the Squeezebox players were ever Windows devices, and the server software isn't an audio application - it sends packets of data via TCP/IP to the players. You can run the server on a machine without any audio devices at all. So where would a "native audio driver for Windows" fit?

Yes that's exactly what squeezebox NOT aspired to be a soundcard with a long wire :)

BJW
2015-10-22, 20:15
Comments like this just go to show how badly some people misunderstand the Squeezebox ecosystem.

None of the Squeezebox players were ever Windows devices, and the server software isn't an audio application - it sends packets of data via TCP/IP to the players. You can run the server on a machine without any audio devices at all. So where would a "native audio driver for Windows" fit?

i do understand the ecosystem. i have been using this stuff for ~ten years now.

the things you point out, are things i know and knew and just obvious. the things i am saying that you are replying to, are things that i consider to be part of why all this ecosystem died. and just to be clear, it is dead.

i have np with what exists. my problem is with what they didn't create. there should have been more focus on the windows market, b/c without that market, this was never going to be viable. the problem was that there was too much blind ideology or philosophy involved, basically a commitment to platform independence above all else, (mainly b/c the devs were all linux/mac types, and none of them live and work and play in a windows environment).

what i suggested, (and i did so before this ecosystem died) is that had they made a windows driver, that then fed a transparent app whose job was to feed the audio from the driver into TCP/IP to the devices, then this all might have been viable. the advantage for the user is that they then could have used any software on the computer they wanted to use. i for one, find the server to be ridiculously designed, and not fun to use. that seems to be the sentiment of the market as well.

i could have used winamp to play all my stuff the way i ALREADY was using winamp. and i can remote control my winamp too, i don't need server for that. think about it, all the money/resources/time poured into developing server, which was not a revenue generator, could have been used elsewhere.

anyway, it makes no difference now if i am right or wrong. but what must be acknowledged, is what was done, was not the right thing to do.

toby10
2015-10-23, 02:05
..... i could have used winamp to play all my stuff the way i ALREADY was using winamp. and i can remote control my winamp too, i don't need server for that. .

WinAmp is a server.

epoch1970
2015-10-23, 04:36
what must be acknowledged, is what was done, was not the right thing to do.
Right. But that's as far as I am with you.
How do you explain Sonos is still in the market? They do market expensive stuff, and their design is a networked audio system, not a long audio cable for windows desktops.
In addition, the long audio cable is called Bluetooth nowadays. Logi sells affordable BT audio devices. Yet they've not taken the world over, as far as I can see.

(recycling the Transporter... dreadful thing to do.)

Golden Earring
2017-03-13, 07:40
Hi guys!

Just a quick pointer to my recent thread in the Audiophile sub-forum under the above heading (it's near the top of page 1), in case you don't graze there often.

If anyone still wants one, or even a spare for insurance, they're not over-priced now...

Best regards,
Dave :)

pablolie
2017-03-17, 22:01
The problem was they only saw value in hardware (selling Transporters or Touches or Booms), but never realized the software ecosystem was actually the more valuable asset. I have often said I would have paid $ for an LMS and especially a "Squeeze Slave" agent license. Why that stuff was always given away defies logic. But many companies don't deal with the transition from hardware to a software ecosystem.

Hammer865
2018-04-22, 07:16
Fellow Transporters,

I started with the SB after reading a review by David Pogue in the NYT "personal tech" column, around 2004.

Then sprung the $2000 for the Transporter in 2006 and sold the SB. It sits in my rack with an ADCOM GTP-602 preamp (which I selected for the phono support), Adcom GFA-5000 (200 X 2), Thorens 3-speed (I can play my grandmothers 78s!), a Niles speaker selector box (2 halves to my apartment, so need the A/B option), and a pair of Acoustic Engineering AEII's in the large room, DeVore Gibbon 3's in the smaller room.

Turn the Transporter off at night: I tended to leave mine on and the power supply generated enough heat to eventually toast the capacitors nearby. Fortunately, there is an old school repair shop called ANALOGIQUE on West 20th in Manhattan that offered to try and save it. It took a couple of months, but they did salvage it. I wasn't sure they would, so I grabbed one off EBAY for $550....it arrived with its own power supply issue, so once I got my original back, they fixed the used one also.

The My Squeezbox option works well, but somehow it cannot seem to sync to the LMS and allow me to stream my ITUNES. In the LMS software, I see "you player not found". It used to connect, has in the past, but now seems arbitrary at best and has not worked in a few months. But when I select "My Squeezebox", it connects every time. Wireless signal in the Settings shows 99%. Any ideas?

Thanks, have enjoyed reading your posts. MRH1959@EXCITE.COM Terence

garym
2018-04-22, 11:28
Fellow Transporters,

I started with the SB after reading a review by David Pogue in the NYT "personal tech" column, around 2004.

Then sprung the $2000 for the Transporter in 2006 and sold the SB. It sits in my rack with an ADCOM GTP-602 preamp (which I selected for the phono support), Adcom GFA-5000 (200 X 2), Thorens 3-speed (I can play my grandmothers 78s!), a Niles speaker selector box (2 halves to my apartment, so need the A/B option), and a pair of Acoustic Engineering AEII's in the large room, DeVore Gibbon 3's in the smaller room.

Turn the Transporter off at night: I tended to leave mine on and the power supply generated enough heat to eventually toast the capacitors nearby. Fortunately, there is an old school repair shop called ANALOGIQUE on West 20th in Manhattan that offered to try and save it. It took a couple of months, but they did salvage it. I wasn't sure they would, so I grabbed one off EBAY for $550....it arrived with its own power supply issue, so once I got my original back, they fixed the used one also.

The My Squeezbox option works well, but somehow it cannot seem to sync to the LMS and allow me to stream my ITUNES. In the LMS software, I see "you player not found". It used to connect, has in the past, but now seems arbitrary at best and has not worked in a few months. But when I select "My Squeezebox", it connects every time. Wireless signal in the Settings shows 99%. Any ideas?

Thanks, have enjoyed reading your posts. MRH1959@EXCITE.COM Terence

On the transporter itself, have you used the menu to select "my music". At that point, it should offer to connect to your LMS music library (whatever name you gave your library in LMS > Settings).

Hammer865
2018-08-25, 10:25
GaryM,
Thanks for your reply and I checked that setting and it is pointed at my Itunes library.
I still struggle with having only my Squeezebox account verified so I can stream radio, etc, but I when I select "Connect to LMS" to connect to my PC to be able to stream my ITunes but I get these errors.

Any thoughts?

Your player was not found.

If you own a Squeezebox or Transporter:

Make sure that your player is plugged in and its networking settings are correct. Click the Refresh button once your player is connected.

FROM THE "INFORMATION" tab, notice "Total Players Recognized: 0" (when it used to work correctly, this always said "1")


Logitech Media Server Version: 7.7.6 - 1521467459 @ Thu Mar 29 16:46:01 WEDT 2018
Hostname: Terence-PC
Server IP Address: 192.168.0.4
Server HTTP Port Number: 9000
Operating system: Windows 7 - EN - cp1252
Platform Architecture: 8664
Perl Version: 5.14.1 - MSWin32-x86-multi-thread
Database Version: DBD::SQLite 1.34_01 (sqlite 3.7.7.1)
Total Players Recognized: 0

Hammer865
2018-08-25, 10:52
Transporter

Type: Transporter

Status: Not Connected


so how do I get it to connect?

garym
2018-08-25, 11:00
Transporter

Type: Transporter

Status: Not Connected


so how do I get it to connect?

on Transporter menu (unit itself), select "My Music" then it will try to connect to your local LMS. If you have more than one LMS running locally, choose the name you've given your LMS music library (in LMS webGUI, in SETTINGS, Basic Settings Tab, media library name). This will connect your Transporter to LMS running on your local computer.

RonM
2018-08-26, 17:46
Jeez, Gary, more than 11,000 posts? You are indeed a warrior!

R.

garym
2018-08-27, 03:52
Jeez, Gary, more than 11,000 posts? You are indeed a warrior!

R.

oh my....I spend way too much time in front of a computer.