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stevebaggs
2015-03-08, 13:35
I'm hoping this will ring a bell with someone here.

I have a Receiver that has worked fine for some time on an Ethernet connection. I now want to use it on WiFi (same LAN, same server).

I did a factory reset on the Receiver (hold button in until it flashes red rapidly), and the Receiver duly appeared on the controller with its default name. I started the configuration process by telling it to connect to the WiFi network. The controller displayed the spinning disc waiting for a connection, meanwhile the Receiver with through the sequence of lights showing it had connected to WiFi and got an IP (steady red, yellow, green, blue). At this point I would expect the controller to prompt me for the IP of the LMS server - but it didn't, the disk just kept on spinning.

After several minutes the controller reported that it could not connect to the WiFi network - the Receiver, meanwhile, showed a blue light indicating it was connected to the network and was waiting to be given the address of the LMS server. A check on the router (DHCP server) confirmed that it was in the client list with an IP allocated.

If I restart the controller with the blue light showing on the Receiver, the Receiver does not appear on the controller. If I reset the Receiver (flashing red light) then it does appear with its default name.

I have tried:-

- Several factory resets of the Receiver

- Several factory resets of the Controller

- Several reboots of the router / DHCP server

- Giving the Receiver a fixed IP, and also reserving an IP on the router (but we know DHCP is working, so I doubt if this is relevant)

There are two Squeezebox Radios on the same WiFi network, and one other receiver on Ethernet. All of those are working fine, so LMS is running OK. Just to be sure, though, I uninstalled and reinstalled it - same result. The Receiver in question does not show in the list of connected players.

After spending several hours on this, I still have a Receiver showing a blue light while the Controller tells me the Receiver can't connect to the WiFi. It appears the WiFi connection is OK (the Receiver appears in the router client list), we know LMS is OK (the three other players are working), and the Controller operates the other players OK. I've run out of ideas - has anyone else seen this and have an answer to it, please?

Mnyb
2015-03-08, 21:09
First you should not need to give it the server IP it should automatically discover the server if port 3483 UDP is open on the server ?

And what version of the server and controller firmware and reciver firmware ?

If nothing else works try the net udap comandline utility .

What IP adress does it apear to have btw .

You can not see it the pull down player list on the server ? As conected to mysqueezebox.com

stevebaggs
2015-03-09, 04:31
> First you should not need to give it the server IP it should automatically discover the server if port 3483 UDP is open on the server ?

- NETSTAT says the server PC is listening on 3483.

> And what version of the server and controller firmware and reciver firmware ?

- LMS version 7.7.5, Controller firmware version 7.7.3 r16662, Receiver firmware version 77

> If nothing else works try the net udap comandline utility .

- Yes, that's an option - I have a Win7Pro64 PC with Perl installed already, do you know if that will do the job?

> What IP adress does it apear to have btw .

- The receiver is on 192.168.1.36

> You can not see it the pull down player list on the server ? As conected to mysqueezebox.com

- That's correct - when the blue light is displayed, the receiver does not appear on the server list in LMS. The other devices do appear.

This morning I tried reconnecting the Receiver with an Ethernet cable via a HomePlug, and it was picked up immediately and works correctly. As an experiment, I tried connecting to WiFi with an Ethernet cable connected - back to the blue light problem. Go back to Ethernet and it's up and running in a minute.

So it seems that, even though the Receiver is able to connect to the WAP, there is something about the WiFi connection that prevents it from connecting to LMS. The WiFi signal is good - the Receiver is in the same room as the WAP, and the Squeezebox radios that use WiFi are much further away, in other rooms, and work well.

I'm coming to the conclusion that there is a fault in the Receiver's WiFi card that I haven't noticed before because it has always been on Ethernet, but if you have any other thoughts I'd like to hear them - I would rather not have the Ethernet cable in this environment if I can help it, there's enough wire there already!

Mnyb
2015-03-09, 07:49
Aha a wap is it really configured as the "same network" for server discovery to work server and player must be on the same network .

A mistake can be to just connect two routers in series wan to LAN or similar .

Port forwarding could. Work but better have things on the same network .

w3wilkes
2015-03-09, 09:47
I had this happen with one of my receivers. It just refused to connect to the server. I ended up having to use Net::UDAP to put in the LMS server IP address. Then I did a not factory reset (just pushed the front without holding it in), it then connected and I haven't had an issue since.

stevebaggs
2015-03-09, 10:01
Aha a wap is it really configured as the "same network" for server discovery to work server and player must be on the same network .

Everything is on the same subnet, if that's what you mean - 192.168.1.* with mask 255.255.255.0. The WAP interface has its own IP (192.168.1.253) but using this WiFi-connected PC, tracert shows only one hop to the server:-
==============================
C:\Users\Stephen>tracert 192.168.1.5

Tracing route to zinc [192.168.1.5]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

1 3 ms 2 ms 2 ms ZINC [192.168.1.5]

Trace complete.
==============================
Or am I missing your point? Happy to try port forwarding.

stevebaggs
2015-03-09, 10:04
I ended up having to use Net::UDAP to put in the LMS server IP address.

If Net::UDAP allows me to make that sort of configuration change then perhaps I should try it. I'm not getting the same problem with Squeezebox Radios, but maybe their firmware is different from the Receivers.

w3wilkes
2015-03-09, 10:22
When it happened to me it only affected one of my 2 receivers. I tried everything with the one that wouldn't connect and Net::UDAP finally rescued me.

Mnyb
2015-03-09, 11:32
Everything is on the same subnet, if that's what you mean - 192.168.1.* with mask 255.255.255.0. The WAP interface has its own IP (192.168.1.253) but using this WiFi-connected PC, tracert shows only one hop to the server:-
==============================
C:\Users\Stephen>tracert 192.168.1.5

Tracing route to zinc [192.168.1.5]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

1 3 ms 2 ms 2 ms ZINC [192.168.1.5]

Trace complete.
==============================
Or am I missing your point? Happy to try port forwarding.

I'm a bit unfamiliar with your setup but it s perfectly possible to have two 192.168.1.x and subnet 255.255.255.0 networks that are not the same that's the whole idea routers work on there is an internal and one external side of it .

I may be totally wrong here .

Do try net udap it helped me with my old reciever when I had misconfiguted ( unknovingly ) my firewall .

Also do your router have any wifi ? Try there instead of on the AP . Just as a test it may be to far away ( hence you using an AP ) but move the reciever there to try .

stevebaggs
2015-03-09, 15:33
Also do your router have any wifi ? Try there instead of on the AP

Good thought, but no, the router doesn't have WiFi. There is a switch between the router and the WAP too, which might complicate matters further (the router has one Ethernet port which is patched to a 16-port switch, and the rest of the network goes from there).

You and w3wilkes have convinced me that Net:UDAP is the way to go and I've downloaded the Windows .exe and read a tutorial. It looks pretty straightforward, but knowing how minutes turn into hours when messing around with networking I'm going to do it later this week when I have a bit of time to spare.

Thanks to both of you for the advice - I was giving up hope! I'll report back later in the week, and I'm fairly optimistic that I'll be saying that the problem is sorted.

Swiftie
2015-03-10, 00:09
... There is a switch between the router and the WAP too, which might complicate matters further...
Your network seems topologically similar to mine, and mine is rock solid. I'll describe my network from the perspective of the LMS, on my desktop PC in "my room":


LMS runs on PC which plugs into Gigabit Switch [2m]
Gigibit Switch connects to Gigabit port #1 in my router [10m]
Router Gigabit port #2 connects to Powerline adapter #1 [20m]
Powerline adapter #1 connects wirelessly through wall to other Powerline adapter #2 [<1m]
Powerline adapter #2 connectes to 100Mb Switch near Receiver [15m]
Switch connects to Belkin WiFi access point [2m]
Belkin WiFi connects wirelessly to player (and controller) [3m]


The numbers in brackets [15m] represent the cable or wireless length.
Topologically, there is a cluster of devices on a switch in "my room", the switch is cabled to my router. There is another cluster of devices on a switch in my living room. This switch is cabled to my router, but uses a pair of powerline adapter to penetrate a wall (I was too scared to drill through the wall, because of unknown cabling, hence the powerline adapters).

I use ping to diagnose network problems from my PC. Along the route I can ping the router itself (192.168.1.1) and the Belkin AP (192.168.1.8). When all is working (99.9% of the time) I can ping the Controller and Receiver, to confirm that the Belkin WiFi AP is working. I can also verify the path via the Belkin AP back to the router with sundry smartphones/tablets.
I can probe intermediate points (the two switches) by pinging other devices on the same switch.

The weakest link in this path seemed to be the Belkin AP, but that cleared up when I replaced my old ZyXEL router with a new ASUS one. The ZyXEL router was rebooting 2-3 times per day, and I think that was screwing up the DHCP address allocations, or DHCP lease renewals.

In my experience, the presence of two (unmanaged) switches and a pair of powerline adapters is transparent to the network; none of them has ever been identified as the source of any problem, to wit, I have never power-cycled any of these devices since installing them (several years ago). Power failures will have recycled the powerline adapters and 100Mb switch, but these events are rare and never coincided with blue-light syndrome.

So, in summary, I doubt that your switch will enter into the problem.

stevebaggs
2015-03-10, 02:39
Your network seems topologically similar to mine

Yes, it is very similar. The only major difference is that I have an Ethernet cable between the "office" (where the server, router and several other devices live, hanging off a 16-por switch), and another switch in the living room which supports the WAP and an Ethernet-connected Receiver (not the one I've had problems with). I'm hoping to get the second Receiver (his'n'hers Receivers!) running wirelessly in the living room, rather than have a long patch cable back to the living room switch: but, as you have seen, I ran into the blue light problem.

For now I've got around it by running the second Receiver on Powerline and that arrangement seems to be stable (it ran for several hours last night, anyway), but if I can get it running over WiFi it will be neater so I'll have a go with net::UDAP later in the week. If it all goes pear-shaped, I can just factory-reset and go back to the Powerline arrangement so I shouldn't lose anything.