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c2r
2015-01-19, 03:54
So... for those of you out there using the pi for your server or players, what cases have you settled on?

I've bought a couple of these delightful wooden ones from Amazon:
https://sites.google.com/site/granadaguitar/otras-cosas-other-things/raspberry-pi

One for the B with Wolfson, and another for my B+

I'd be interested to see what anyone else uses?

Grumpy Bob
2015-04-02, 05:07
Here's a set up destined for my office.

Raspberry Pi B running piCorePlayer 1.19 with a HiFiBerry DAC (https://www.hifiberry.com/dac). The Amplifier is an Amptastic Mini-1 (http://www.amptastic.com/). Speakers are QAcoustics 3010 bookshelf (http://www.qacoustics.co.uk/3010-stereo-speaker.htm) speakers.

As an alternative to the Pi, I can use iPeng on an iPad via an iPhone dock. The Amptastic Mini-1 is a neat little amp with a footprint smaller than a CD case.

The case used for the Pi is a budget case that I drilled to fit the RCA sockets connected to the HiFiBerry DAC.

17817

Harryl89
2015-05-05, 00:39
http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?103465-some-of-my-builds

kidstypike
2015-05-05, 01:30
Raspberry pi B+ with a HiFiBerry DAC+, stood on it's side, the wires drop through a hole in the bookcase shelf (centre, behind the black cat).

Speakers are AVI DM5 actives (superb) - controlled by Squeeze Control on an Android phone/tablet.

Jeff07971
2016-01-11, 16:44
Photo of my latest project.

Raspberry Pi 2 Running piCorePlayer

Hifiberry DAC+ Pro

2 (soon to be 4) ICEPower 300ASC Power amps

Sounds Great !


19717

pmcdnz
2016-05-13, 18:00
20463

Pioneer SP22 BS speakers with RPi2 HifiBerry Amp+ HifiBerry Case. PiCorePlayer

Sounds great definitely enough power for these speakers doesn't really need EQ

Grumpy Bob
2016-06-08, 22:01
Here's a set up destined for my office.

Raspberry Pi B running piCorePlayer 1.19 with a HiFiBerry DAC (https://www.hifiberry.com/dac). The Amplifier is an Amptastic Mini-1 (http://www.amptastic.com/). Speakers are QAcoustics 3010 bookshelf (http://www.qacoustics.co.uk/3010-stereo-speaker.htm) speakers.

As an alternative to the Pi, I can use iPeng on an iPad via an iPhone dock. The Amptastic Mini-1 is a neat little amp with a footprint smaller than a CD case.

The case used for the Pi is a budget case that I drilled to fit the RCA sockets connected to the HiFiBerry DAC.

17817

I'm currently using the set up described above with LMS running on a WD WiFi My Passport as described in this thread (http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?105512-Portable-squeezebox-with-a-Western-Digital-quot-Passport-Wireless-quot).
Works very well, and independent of my work wifi network.

Robert

Pascal Hibon
2016-07-21, 03:37
Inspired by the RaspTouch project (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1626717193/audiophile-touch-audio-player-raspberry-pi-3-sabre?ref=nav_search) I decide to prototype a similar case for one of my RPI's. I have been toying with a similar construction for quite some time but my mind couldn't agree on a solution to fix the display. The above project shed some new light on that; solutions are sometimes so very simply that they get overlooked :D

This is the current state of the prototype:

20791

20792

20793

The display is angled at 10 degrees. I used a Hammond Enclosure I had used for another project. The enclosure has been cut to fit the desired dimensions (and angle).
There is still room besides the RPI to install an SPDIF hat. I re-used a part of the bezel of the original RPI display stand.
The display is now actually mounted upside down but it is rotated in the configuration. By rotating the display I finally could address the "fixing issue" I had. The flat cable is not sitting on the bottom side of the enclosure; this is way it is hidden.

All connectors are now available at the back side of the enclosure. This has been my main concern with the display cases currently on the market.

kolossos4730
2016-07-21, 07:38
Inspired by the RaspTouch project (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1626717193/audiophile-touch-audio-player-raspberry-pi-3-sabre?ref=nav_search) I decide to prototype a similar case for one of my RPI's. I have been toying with a similar construction for quite some time but my mind couldn't agree on a solution to fix the display. The above project shed some new light on that; solutions are sometimes so very simply that they get overlooked :D

...

The display is angled at 10 degrees. I used a Hammond Enclosure I had used for another project. The enclosure has been cut to fit the desired dimensions (and angle).
There is still room besides the RPI to install an SPDIF hat. I re-used a part of the bezel of the original RPI display stand.
The display is now actually mounted upside down but it is rotated in the configuration. By rotating the display I finally could address the "fixing issue" I had. The flat cable is not sitting on the bottom side of the enclosure; this is way it is hidden.

All connectors are now available at the back side of the enclosure. This has been my main concern with the display cases currently on the market.

Pascal,

Nice! Interesting solution for people who find the Audiophonics solution too expensive or the angle of the display too steep.

FYI the display is now the right way up; all earlier display stands mounted the display upside-down. This should improve the vertical viewing angle of the display according to several sources (see this (https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=121263)link)

Arie

Pascal Hibon
2016-07-21, 08:58
Pascal,

Nice! Interesting solution for people who find the Audiophonics solution too expensive or the angle of the display too steep.

FYI the display is now the right way up; all earlier display stands mounted the display upside-down. This should improve the vertical viewing angle of the display according to several sources (see this (https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=121263)link)

Arie

Now that you mention it, yes the viewing angles is better this way. Thanks for sharing Arie!

albertone74
2016-08-18, 01:34
Inspired by the RaspTouch project (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1626717193/audiophile-touch-audio-player-raspberry-pi-3-sabre?ref=nav_search) I decide to prototype a similar case for one of my RPI's. I have been toying with a similar construction for quite some time but my mind couldn't agree on a solution to fix the display. The above project shed some new light on that; solutions are sometimes so very simply that they get overlooked :D

This is the current state of the prototype:

20791

20792

20793

The display is angled at 10 degrees. I used a Hammond Enclosure I had used for another project. The enclosure has been cut to fit the desired dimensions (and angle).
There is still room besides the RPI to install an SPDIF hat. I re-used a part of the bezel of the original RPI display stand.
The display is now actually mounted upside down but it is rotated in the configuration. By rotating the display I finally could address the "fixing issue" I had. The flat cable is not sitting on the bottom side of the enclosure; this is way it is hidden.

All connectors are now available at the back side of the enclosure. This has been my main concern with the display cases currently on the market.

Hi Pascal,

This is just fanstastic! It looks great. Now I really want it as well;)

I am so tempted to get a new display (I have got the first model with no brightness control) and build such a nice system with one of my spare RPis!

Arie,

BTW your VU meter was the main reason to purchase the display ;) Excellent job!

PS. Pascal, just out of curiosity which sort of DIY tool did you use to cut the case?

Pascal Hibon
2016-08-18, 10:36
Hi Pascal,

This is just fanstastic! It looks great. Now I really want it as well;)

I am so tempted to get a new display (I have got the first model with no brightness control) and build such a nice system with one of my spare RPis!

Arie,

BTW your VU meter was the main reason to purchase the display ;) Excellent job!

PS. Pascal, just out of curiosity which sort of DIY tool did you use to cut the case?

Thank you Alberto!
I used a tenon-saw like this one:

https://www.bosch-do-it.de/media/media/garden/gardenmedia/icons/1022047_600_370.png

I have a blade to cut aluminium.
The angle is about 10 degrees.

Since a couple of weeks I have an spdif board fitted as well. I now need to finish the back panel. I'll post some pics when I get the chance.

albertone74
2016-08-19, 02:07
Thank you Alberto!
I used a tenon-saw like this one:

https://www.bosch-do-it.de/media/media/garden/gardenmedia/icons/1022047_600_370.png

I have a blade to cut aluminium.
The angle is about 10 degrees.

Since a couple of weeks I have an spdif board fitted as well. I now need to finish the back panel. I'll post some pics when I get the chance.

Great, thanks for sharing Pascal. And very much looking forward to seeing more pictures!

Pascal Hibon
2016-12-18, 08:51
I've build another one for a friend. This time I used a black Hammond enclosure and used a 15 degree angle on the display (instead of 10 degrees). I like this one better...

21724


And this is the back side. This player is fitted with an IQaudio analog DAC.


21725

The black smudges around the the USB and Ethernet connectors is cause by a black marker. I wanted to hide the aluminium color by coloring them black but the paper (used for the back panel) sucked up some of the marker's ink. It's a pity this happend... but otherwise happy with the result.

EDIT: below a picture of the guts:


21726

albertone74
2016-12-28, 03:29
I've build another one for a friend. This time I used a black Hammond enclosure and used a 15 degree angle on the display (instead of 10 degrees). I like this one better...

21724


And this is the back side. This player is fitted with an IQaudio analog DAC.


21725

The black smudges around the the USB and Ethernet connectors is cause by a black marker. I wanted to hide the aluminium color by coloring them black but the paper (used for the back panel) sucked up some of the marker's ink. It's a pity this happend... but otherwise happy with the result.

EDIT: below a picture of the guts:


21726

Hi Pascal,

That looks great. Very nice and neat job! I love it!

cliver
2017-01-10, 03:35
This is what I have done so far...
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170110/3d7b62c77882f9d00d69c17d103bf239.jpg
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170110/396c46956fc79eeb0eca27de35989142.jpg
It's the official 7 inch display case, RPi3 and a DigiAmp+ board from IQAudio. It's a tight squeeze and I had to cut away one of the back panel mounting lugs and make a cut away for the power plug. I also squeezed 2 speaker connections in :). I need to tidy the cables up as this is a prototype. It seems to work ok and doesn't overheat but time will tell if it's reliable. Just need to find some means of fitting a lid of some kind on the back to make it complete.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

pgnyc
2017-05-07, 13:48
Here my son config :

RPI 3 - $50
Smarticase Pi 7" Touchscreen Display - LEGO - $28
Raspberry Pi 7" Touchscreen Display - $70
Vishay Tsop4838 Ir Receiver, 38Khz - $2

Alesis M1 Active320 Professional USB Audio Speaker System - $80

total $230

Reusing a SB3 remote !


22672

iPhone
2017-05-12, 08:18
I've build another one for a friend. This time I used a black Hammond enclosure and used a 15 degree angle on the display (instead of 10 degrees). I like this one better...

21724


.
.
Nicely done!!! :cool:

Now that I have paid homage to the form, finish, and craftsmanship of your efforts, how would you feel about posting a parts list so others might also build one in tribute to all your wonderful and hard work? ;)
.
.

Pascal Hibon
2017-05-13, 00:20
.
.
Nicely done!!! :cool:

Now that I have paid homage to the form, finish, and craftsmanship of your efforts, how would you feel about posting a parts list so others might also build one in tribute to all your wonderful and hard work? ;)
.
.

Thanks ! you got me blushing now ;)

These are the parts used:

Enclosure:
Hammond Enclosure 1455T2201BK (http://www.hammondmfg.com/1455.htm)

Dac / hats:
HiFi Berry DIGI+ clone (https://www.fasttech.com/products/1/10023729/5137000-pifi-hifi-digi-digital-sound-card-w-i2s-to-s-pdif) for an SPDIF interface. It is cheaper that the HiFi Berry and includes a IR sensor.

The one I built for a friend has analog output:
Pi-DAC+ (http://iqaudio.co.uk/audio/8-pi-dac-0712411999643.html)

Display:
Official PRI 7" display (https://thepihut.com/collections/raspberry-pi-screens/products/official-raspberry-pi-7-touchscreen-display)
I also used the black frame (https://thepihut.com/collections/raspberry-pi-screens/products/raspberry-pi-7-touchscreen-display-frame)

Power supply:
Mean Well 5 volt / 3 A (http://www.conrad.be/ce/nl/product/1439180/Mean-Well-GST18E05-P1J-Stekkernetvoeding-vaste-spanning-5-VDC-3000-mA-15-W)

Connectors:
DC Connector (http://www.conrad.be/ce/nl/product/1460780/Laagspannings-connector-------Bus-inbouw-verticaal----57-mm-------21-m)
RCA connectors (http://www.conrad.be/ce/nl/product/731112/Rean-AV-NYS367-9-Cinch-connector-Flensbus-contacten-recht-Aantal-polen-2-Wit-1-stuks) in case of a analog DAC.

Additionally there are some mechanical parts (aluminium to fix the display to the enclosure). I will have to build another one fro another friend. I'll take some pictures and post them when I build it.

Pascal Hibon
2017-05-25, 05:13
Additionally there are some mechanical parts (aluminium to fix the display to the enclosure). I will have to build another one fro another friend. I'll take some pictures and post them when I build it.

Today I started building another streamer for another friend. This one will use the same Hammond enclosure but the display will be mounted straight (because the streamer will sit on a high shelf in his audio rack). This time I used a larger 2 mm aluminium plate so that the display is fixed with its 4 mounting screws. The same plate could be used in an angled setup.

22763

I'm still waiting for a few parts to arrive to complete the entire build. But I will post pics again when finished. This one will have a power supply inside and have a trigger control so that the streamer is automatically powered when the pre-amp switches on.

Pascal Hibon
2017-07-01, 13:29
Finished the RPI streamer for another friend.
This one has an internal power supply and is fitted with an SPDIF hat. Initially I planned on using the Hifiberry Digi+ but it doesn't work well with the display. The PCB sits over the display connecter and so obstructing the display cable. The Hifiberry "clone" does not have that issue. The clone also has a better supply filtering on board.
The streamer also has a 12 volts trigger input so that it is automatically powered on when the preamp is switched on.
Below are some pictures of the streamer:


2303123032

edwin2006
2017-07-02, 01:29
Looking nice. Which hifiberry one did you use?

Pascal Hibon
2017-07-02, 01:38
Looking nice. Which hifiberry one did you use?

Thanks!
I didn't use the Hifiberry beacsue it doesn't alow the display connecter to be fitted on the RPI.
I used the PiFi HIFI DiGi+ (https://www.fasttech.com/products/1/10023729/5137000-pifi-hifi-digi-digital-sound-card-w-i2s-to-s-pdif) instead. It is cheaper and I find it better constructed than the Hifiberry Digi+.

epoch1970
2017-07-04, 13:10
I have to say, I love this one. Ok it doesn't sound so great but it is, IMHO, the very definition of cheap and cheerful.
23044
23045
Integration is very basic:
- The original power cable was extended with a Y cable powering both the amp and the Pi. Ground hum is tolerable, YMMV :)
- The amp has auto shut-off, that's a nice thought when powering the box with batteries but it is a bit adverse in my case. I soldered a cable to a reset pad on the amp board and flip-flop a gpio output pin to wake the amp when needed. Squeezelite does that on power up, for example.
- The Pi 3 is sort of a tight fit in there. I did away with the bottom of the battery compartment and mounted the Pi flush to the battery cover flap to expose its ports.

And PCP does the rest, as usual ;)

ElFishi
2017-07-10, 13:46
I can do cheap and cheerful!

Kitchen radio, based on Raspberry Pi Zero W and ES9023 DAC sourced from ebay.
Software is piCorePlayer, slimmer and LIRC.


2307723078230792308023081

lesliew
2017-07-10, 19:36
A case that I cut out of a 2.5" thick block of wood using my CNC. This is v2 which took just over 5 minutes total to cut.

Using Official 7" display, Pi 2, HiFiBerry Amp+ and a couple of 2.5" speakers.

23082

slimhase
2017-08-31, 07:36
Hi; have a look at my "pi PAL".
Its a Tivoli PAL, which I upgraded with a Pi Zero W running the awesome piCorePlayer.
I wanted to have a very basic system with low energy consumption, so it is headless (-> use Smartphone as remote).
Also, I use no external DAC, but simple PWM Audio similar as on the Pi3. That is good enough for a desktop radio.
The power for the Pi is diverted from the PAL's internal batterypack, soldering an additional cable at the 4th battery (4.8V), which feeds the Pi +5V input.
Another nice feature: No additional switches etc. needed to be added to the PAL - just a hole in the back of the case to feed the audio cable from the pi to the Aux input of the PAL. Sticking that cable in the jack does 2 things: The PALs Amp is switched from Radio to Aux (-> the Pi). And the Pi is powering up, as this cable is also the (only) ground connection to the Pi! A nice feature of the piCorePlayer s/w is that it runs completely in RAM, so you can pull that plug (i.e. switching from Pi Audio to Radio and powering the Pi down) w/o risk of SD card corruption.
I am very happy with this setup. Also, battery live is pretty ggod: It is running almost a day already!
See http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?107901-questions-for-a-most-basic-portable-squeezebox-using-PiCorePlayer-and-Pi-Zero-W for some hurdles I had to go through to get it running.

wtnh
2017-09-01, 14:11
I can do cheap and cheerful!

Kitchen radio, based on Raspberry Pi Zero W and ES9023 DAC sourced from ebay.
Software is piCorePlayer, slimmer and LIRC.


2307723078230792308023081

Parts list? Please?

Thanks!

ElFishi
2017-09-02, 11:56
Duh,

glad you like it, but that is literally the parts list...

The rest is "standard" or came from the parts box.


Raspberry Pi Zero W
"Audiophonics DAC Sabre ES9023 I2S vers Analogique 24bit/192KHZ Raspberry PI" (search this in ebay)
"2004 LCD blue Display for Arduino HD44780" (again, this should produce a useful result in ebay)
EC11 Rotary Encoder
DIP4 push buttons
bunch of 10k pull-up resistors
IR Receiver 38 kHz TSOP4838
the driver for the display background lighting is a BC546B with a 10k base resistor, any transistor will do the job
10k trimpot for the contrast
since the pics were taken I added a 2200uF Panasonic FM cap across the power input under the DAC board
the box came with cotton swabs
the perspex is 3mm. My hardware store cuts them to measure as small as 10cm, 40ct a pop.
all bolts and nuts M3


Any questions just ask.

atca
2017-09-09, 15:38
My roberts Pi radio... Beats your usual bluetooth boombox.

30-40 hours battery, charges via old line out.

Runs Volumio with squeezelite, spotify-web-connect and airplay.

Working analog ALPS volume pot, with push on / off power.

Working buttons:
1. Swap between wifi between access point mode (to stream from phone to when no wifi network connection near) and client mode (to use on a network)
2. Radio station up
3. Radio station down

The radio frequency knob not currently integrated, thinking about adding a digital rotary encoder to it.

Hardware
2x BMR 2x 20w speakers
1x 3w class D pam 8403 amp
1x RPi B+
1x Iqaudio PiDac+
1x edimax wifi
1x mausberry power switch
1x big battery aukey 20000mah
1x Roberts R404https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170909/a127b41e98b3829a17748872551f5e9e.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170909/977f03c77b11cf9d07a60a507b405032.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170909/0f9ede17ed67d8693c21a0ad5b7eb94b.jpg

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Julf
2017-09-10, 06:19
Very cool! Been thinking of doing something similar for portable use - already have one rpi inside a 1950's tube radio.

Jeff07971
2017-09-17, 09:53
Looking forward to see the details of these:-

https://www.hifiberry.com/beocreate

wtnh
2017-10-02, 09:44
Finished the RPI streamer for another friend.
This one has an internal power supply and is fitted with an SPDIF hat. Initially I planned on using the Hifiberry Digi+ but it doesn't work well with the display. The PCB sits over the display connecter and so obstructing the display cable. The Hifiberry "clone" does not have that issue. The clone also has a better supply filtering on board.
The streamer also has a 12 volts trigger input so that it is automatically powered on when the preamp is switched on.
Below are some pictures of the streamer:


2303123032

OK - now I am inspired to clone your work ;)! I am planning to build in a power supply as well, but will use a Hammond toroidal transformer and a linear dual regulator like this one (http://www.ebay.com/itm/262629850606). This will enable me to separate the power for the Pi and the DAC (I have an Allo Boss). Also planning a combo switch/filter/fuse power input module.

A couple of questions:
- does this version use the same Hammond box as your previous ones - just not chopped as much? Looks like it is a lot deeper and I will need the extra room.
- Looks like you used a longer-than-standard display cable - where did you get that?

Thanks for a great design!

epoch1970
2017-11-04, 08:09
Some people like me want to give their amp some punch on the cheap and use enclosed PSUs. I thought I'd share about my way of doing this.
The general design is the same as this one (http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?107370-JustBoom-DAC-HAT-Amp-Reviews&p=882942&viewfull=1#post882942): Pi 3, Justboom AMP Hat, 75W PSU, metal box.

This enclosure happens to look just vile, sorry for that...
23958

There is as little material as possible inside the box, both in quantity and variety. The cables are of the high-temperature, low-smoke type. Ground wires are 2.5mm2, AC wires 1.5mm2, DC wires 0.75mm2. They are oversized considering high ambient temperature. Ground cables must be the last ones to melt, go fat and short. Audio cables are 1.5mm2, same type.
23959

Accidental access to mains voltage can kill. I use a grounded alu shield to completely enclose the area. Also note the removable cover is grounded to the case. If the case is anodised, grind it to ensure bare metal contact at ground points. Ensure you have continuity between the earth pin of the power inlet and any part of the box: cover, case, chassis, shield, psu enclosure... everything. (And, no, earthing does not "kill wifi".)
Also, if you do a bit of cutting/grinding, make sure the inside of the case is clean and dust-free. You don't want a speck of metal to detach, land somewhere and cause a short-circuit.
23960

Use a 3-pin power inlet with earth and AC fuse. Dimension your fuse according to the manufacturer's PSU input specifications and the expected power draw. If you can't find the specifications and tests sheet for your PSU... get another one.
Here you see a 250V/1.25A normal blow fuse. 1.25A is probably a bit large, even considering temperature derating. Also note the insulating adhesive feet under the case.
23961

I hope this design is less unsafe than some I see floating around the Internet. And please chime in if you see an issue with it.

epoch1970
2017-11-04, 08:38
In a nicer looking vintage biscuit box. Sorry again for the eyesore above...
23963

epoch1970
2017-11-21, 03:27
Overly complicated project due to the box opening only from the top.
24057
24055
24056

epoch1970
2017-12-08, 09:56
Last one, I think. Housed in a derelict Ténor TS 35 A (http://www.doctsf.com/grandlivre/fiche.php?ref=30480) case, circa 1934.
The USB thinggie is an EnOcean receiver.
24165
24166
24167

Pascal Hibon
2017-12-28, 02:21
A friend of mine bought a Roomplayer from Simple Audio a few years back. The streamer has been sitting in the box for a couple of years until he asked me to help him set it up. We did install the streamer together and found out that the Simple Audio software is so outdated and poorly constructed. Since the company went out of business a few years back there was no way to upgrade the streamer.

The Simple Audio is housed in a beautiful enclosure and it is fitted with a good amplifier (ICEpower 50ASX; an amplifier build by B&O). It would be a shame to let those parts go to waste so I suggested to him to upgrade the Roomplayer to a Squeezebox device. Here are a few pictures of the internals:

1. The enclosure with the original Simple Audio PCB on right:

24242

2. I fitted an aluminum plate that would serve as the bottom plate for the new streamer guts:

24243

3. The final setup of the Squeezebox streamer:

24244

4. The finished product:

24245

From the outside it still looks like a Simple Audio streamer but it now is a Squeezebox.
If anyone is interested, these are the parts I used:

* An RPI model B
* An IQaudio DAC+ (http://iqaudio.co.uk/hats/8-pi-dac-0712411999643.html)
* a 5 volts SMPS (https://www.conrad.be/ce/nl/product/511835/SunPower-SPS-G015-05-ACDC-inbouwnetvoeding-5-VDC-3-A-15-W/SHOP_AREA_37320)
* a custom made trigger relay board (switches the amp on and off)
* a piece of breadboard containing the power LED and driver transistors for the LED and relay.

It's a tight fit but it works great.

odw199
2018-02-05, 16:11
A bit of a rushed picture, but here is my current main setup.

Raspberry pi running piCorePlayer into an All Boss DAC which then feeds an Onkyo 9010 amplifier out to KEF LS50 speakers.

So far very happy with the setup.

24483

s2kiwi
2018-02-23, 18:29
I've gone for what looks to be a slightly different route from the rest of the photos on here. I've gone for a completely hidden install and in-ceiling speakers.

This is one of the ugly monster stacks I've built. This one includes:

Two pi's
2 relays
2 100w mini amps
Shared power supply for the amps


It may not look pretty, but it doesn't matter as it's all hidden away discretely. They are connected to in ceiling speakers in the various rooms, and configured so the various amps turn on/off with the players.

All in all I have 10 separate zones running smoothly.

24601
24602

Grumpy Bob
2018-02-24, 00:05
A bit of a rushed picture, but here is my current main setup.

Raspberry pi running piCorePlayer into an All Boss DAC which then feeds an Onkyo 9010 amplifier out to KEF LS50 speakers.

So far very happy with the setup.

24483

How do you find the Kef LS50 speakers? I was toying with the idea of replacing my floorstanding Missions which take up rather too much space with some smaller speakers. Was thinking of giving the LS50 speakers an audition. Aesthetically I rather like the rose gold cones!

Robert

Paul Webster
2018-02-24, 00:24
I've gone for what looks to be a slightly different route from the rest of the photos on here. I've gone for a completely hidden install and in-ceiling speakers.

This is one of the ugly monster stacks I've built. This one includes:

Two pi's
2 relays
2 100w mini amps
Shared power supply for the amps


It may not look pretty, but it doesn't matter as it's all hidden away discretely. They are connected to in ceiling speakers in the various rooms, and configured so the various amps turn on/off with the players.

All in all I have 10 separate zones running smoothly.



Was that single "ugly monster stack" for 2 zones or more?

edwin2006
2018-02-24, 01:06
Why 2 pi's?

atca
2018-02-24, 02:17
maybe because

That means 5 squeezelite sessions on each rpi.
10 zones might be overkill but using two devices for that is imho a good idea..But how do you get 10 zones from two amps? And two pi's with two line outs?

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

odw199
2018-02-24, 03:14
How do you find the Kef LS50 speakers?

Robert

Love them, they are my first proper speakers and they sound amazing.

Fahzz
2018-02-24, 06:44
How do you find the Kef LS50 speakers? I was toying with the idea of replacing my floorstanding Missions which take up rather too much space with some smaller speakers. Was thinking of giving the LS50 speakers an audition. Aesthetically I rather like the rose gold cones!

Robert

I really like these speakers too. Beware that the online price from KEF Direct fluctuates periodically. They were down to $999 around the holidays last year, but that might have been a one time deal.

wl1
2018-02-24, 18:02
A case that I cut out of a 2.5" thick block of wood using my CNC. This is v2 which took just over 5 minutes total to cut.

Using Official 7" display, Pi 2, HiFiBerry Amp+ and a couple of 2.5" speakers.

23082

Thanks for the inspiration for my Garage Boom2....
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180225/86b4a3670ad99b15763b79fadfff8925.jpg

Raspberry Pi 3 with HifiBrrry Amp2+ piggy backed, with a Meanwell PSU. PiCorePlayer running as SqueezeLite player and Server.

The speakers were Pioneer car speakers left over from years ago....along with 9mm plywood left from lining my shed.

[emoji106]

s2kiwi
2018-02-24, 21:18
But how do you get 10 zones from two amps? And two pi's with two line outs?

Ok, let me give a little more info on the system. This is only one small example part of it.

I generally have each pi doing two things. That may be 2 squeeze players or 1 player and some other function. I found reliability dropped if I had more than 2 players on a single Pi.

The stack you see here as an example has:

Pi 1 = running 1 player (i2c dac) and also my home VPN
Pi 2 = 1 player (i2c Dac) + other monitoring scripts, web server etc.


The rest of the house set up is:

Another stack has 2 pi, 4 players (one i2c DAC and one USB DAC on each pi) and 4 amps.
Another pi3 runs outside speakers with another amp + it runs kodi for the TV.
A laptop software player does the 8th zone (another mini amp). I have a pi/dac to swap this to when I get time


Lastly I have 2 portable speakers I use for the 9th and 10th zones. I'm quite proud of these as they use a great quality Arcam Cube portable speaker with a small pi/dac combo on the back running of the USB power out of the cube - the sound is brilliant and they have about 7-8 hours battery life. These serve a main room, and can also get moved around when I'm working in un-speakered rooms (like the garage, front garden etc)

24612
24613


Actually, I've missed an 11th zone that's used on/off. I run squeeze player on my android to play through noise blocking headphones when doing the lawns/hedge mowing etc.

Everything is controlled by an ipad mounted on the kitchen pantry, a pair of jogglers around the house, or via phone client. I'm working on hardware switches for it at the moment, but it's a work in progress.

deadushka
2018-05-31, 10:05
This is awesome amp. I built it just to try this board and it just floored me. Very easy to assemble.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKBSHRCSArY

wtnh
2018-07-12, 14:16
Inspired by Pascal's designs from last year, I got around to finishing a similar unit. Originally, I was going to put the power supply in the same box as the player, but things got too cramped. So I built a separate box for the linear power supply.

The player consists of a Raspberry Pi 3B, official Raspberry Pi touchscreen, Allo Boss DAC and an Allo I2S isolator.

Finished unit looks like this:

25300

Since I had room in the power supply chassis, I decided to add batteries for the I2S isolator and the DAC. This required a switching relay to connect the LiPo cells in parallel (for charging) and in series for running the DAC. The toroid is a 25VA dual 9 volt secondary unit connected to a dual LT1083 linear regulator, outputting 5 volts for the Pi and 7 volts for the charging circuits. The batteries will run the DAC for about 20 hours - but go into charge mode when I power off the Pi:

25301

Here are the two units side by side:

25302

Here is a closeup of the Pi stack. The Pi is on the bottom, the I2S isolator is in the middle, and the Boss is on the top.

25303

How does it sound? To my ears, pretty darn good, particularly on hi-rez tracks like 24-bit downloads from HD Tracks. On batteries, it is dead silent (ear to speaker, max gain). I will probably upgrade to the new Boss DAC sometime soon sonce most reviewers find it sounding even better.

Thanks to Pascal for the design ideas.

Whit

Pascal Hibon
2018-07-12, 22:45
Inspired by Pascal's designs from last year, I got around to finishing a similar unit. Originally, I was going to put the power supply in the same box as the player, but things got too cramped. So I built a separate box for the linear power supply.

The player consists of a Raspberry Pi 3B, official Raspberry Pi touchscreen, Allo Boss DAC and an Allo I2S isolator.

Finished unit looks like this:

25300

Since I had room in the power supply chassis, I decided to add batteries for the I2S isolator and the DAC. This required a switching relay to connect the LiPo cells in parallel (for charging) and in series for running the DAC. The toroid is a 25VA dual 9 volt secondary unit connected to a dual LT1083 linear regulator, outputting 5 volts for the Pi and 7 volts for the charging circuits. The batteries will run the DAC for about 20 hours - but go into charge mode when I power off the Pi:

25301

Here are the two units side by side:

25302

Here is a closeup of the Pi stack. The Pi is on the bottom, the I2S isolator is in the middle, and the Boss is on the top.

25303

How does it sound? To my ears, pretty darn good, particularly on hi-rez tracks like 24-bit downloads from HD Tracks. On batteries, it is dead silent (ear to speaker, max gain). I will probably upgrade to the new Boss DAC sometime soon sonce most reviewers find it sounding even better.

Thanks to Pascal for the design ideas.

Whit

Wow, great work Whit!
Glad to have inspired you.

The switching of the batteries, does it happen automatically (by means of a GPIO pin acting on power ON / OFF)?

wtnh
2018-07-13, 05:41
Wow, great work Whit!
Glad to have inspired you.

The switching of the batteries, does it happen automatically (by means of a GPIO pin acting on power ON / OFF)?

Not yet - it happens when I kill 5 volts to the Pi via the switch on the right (I try to remember to use the Jivelight gui to shut down PiCorePlayer first). With 5 volts off, the relay de-energizes and puts the batteries in parallel charging mode. The charging circuit is still on.

The switch on the left gives me the option of either running on battery or +7 volts to the isolator and DAC - this is just in case the batteries have discharged and I feel like listening anyway. However, the battery-only functionality is so good (20+ hours) that I may simplify the supply and just eliminate the left switch. I would then only need a single 5 volt supply.

Adding a power "kill" relay driven off gpio would be a logical next step - but I would still need a "restart" switch to bring the system back up.

Beyond that, it would be interesting to add automatic charging. I may get fancy and have two sets of batteries - one set charging while the other supplies the DAC with auto switchover when the active one dies.

Cheers

Pascal Hibon
2018-07-13, 07:32
Adding a power "kill" relay driven off gpio would be a logical next step - but I would still need a "restart" switch to bring the system back up.

Cheers

Not necessary, the Jivelite GPIO off becomes your "power button". It triggers the charging relay and you can have you display blacked out by the screensaver (when off = display off). Your PI is still running and powered but it looks like it is switched off. When pressing the power button, the gpio will trigger the relay to put the batteries out of charging mode.
You might need a bit of changes in the way this is all wired up: for this to work it is important that the I2C isolater stays powered as well, even when the batteries are in charging mode. But that is probably a matter of a few additional diodes (note that I don't know how things are currently wired up).

wtnh
2018-07-14, 05:43
Not necessary, the Jivelite GPIO off becomes your "power button". It triggers the charging relay and you can have you display blacked out by the screensaver (when off = display off). Your PI is still running and powered but it looks like it is switched off. When pressing the power button, the gpio will trigger the relay to put the batteries out of charging mode.
You might need a bit of changes in the way this is all wired up: for this to work it is important that the I2C isolater stays powered as well, even when the batteries are in charging mode. But that is probably a matter of a few additional diodes (note that I don't know how things are currently wired up).

That's a great idea, Pascal. I do recall seeing some relay scripts in this forum for power control. I'll have to look into the practical aspects of doing this. One small issue is that the GPIO pins are covered up by the isolator - but a few are passed onto the DAC. And the Boss DAC exposes a few of these on the Allo Volt header which I don't use, so I will need to investigate if one of them could be used. Alternatively, I could break apart the stack and connect the isolator to the Pi with a ribbon cable and a gpio breakout to keep things tidy. Also - I want to keep strict galvanic isolation between the Pi and the DAC, so may need an addtional relay to keep the isolator powered (currently I use a DPDT switch to do this). If the isolator is off (and therefore the DAC) does this mess up Jivelite? Easy to test.

If I manage to get this to work - I'll post some details - maybe a schematic others may find useful.

Whit

Pascal Hibon
2018-07-14, 08:06
If the isolator is off (and therefore the DAC) does this mess up Jivelite? Easy to test.



I suppose it would mess up the jivelite and or picoreplayer setup since it would loose its audio interface when the isolator is switched off.
But yes, that's easy to test.
Good luck (looking forward to see the results).

wtnh
2018-07-14, 14:36
I suppose it would mess up the jivelite and or picoreplayer setup since it would loose its audio interface when the isolator is switched off.
But yes, that's easy to test.
Good luck (looking forward to see the results).

A quick test confirmed that powering off the I2S isolator and DAC did indeed mess things up.

I used the power off button in Jivelite and then pulled the plug on the isolator and DAC. Plugging the power to the isolator and DAC back in and then using Jivelite to "power on" resulted in picoreplayer losing connection to the DAC (even though the interface looked OK - just no sound), so it looks like I will need to accomodate that in my re-design. This means another relay.

The good news is that this gives me the motivation to re-do the power supply and get rid of the eBay (i.e. China-sourced) regulator board which I never really cared for, and swap in a lower voltage toroid with Schottky rectifiers and a bigger filter cap, plus a fixed regulator. This will make the supply more efficient and reduce heat dissipation, which right now is higher than I like.

The bad news is I need to order more parts :-(.

Whit

wtnh
2018-08-28, 11:51
This is version 2 of my player. I decided I did not like the two-chassis approach and put everything into one Hammond box. In order to do this, I had to design a small PCB and get it fabricated. The PCB contains the rectifiers, filter caps and linear regulator for the +5 volt supply for the Pi. It also contains a battery charging circuit for the LiPos and a set of relays which switch the batteries between parallel (charging mode) and series (playing mode).

I use a GPIO pin from the Pi to control the relay circuit. This is set up in the piCorePlayer web interface and works in conjunction with the LMS PowerSave plugin, as suggested by Pascal (once again, thanks!). When the player is idle, the batteries are put into charge mode when LMS PowerSave times out (minimum of 15 minutes).

While playing, the batteries are completely "floating" and power the Allo isolator which sits between the Pi and the Allo Boss DAC. Thus, the DAC is galvanically isolated from the Pi and its noisy digital circuitry.

The custom PCB is the small board in the middle. You can see the TO-220 type regulator and a couple of the Schottky rectifiers bolted down to the chassis for heatsinking. The batteries are on top of the Raspberry Pi display controller board, which is flopped down to a horizontal mounting position.

Still to do - possibly add some shielding around the toroid and the output RCAs (but it is very quiet electrically). I would need some instrumentation to measure any improvements.

Whit

25543

Greg Erskine
2018-08-28, 14:34
Excellent build Whit,

I like your custom power PCB idea. What software?

Hope the toroid mounting bolt doesn't touch the lid. :)

regard
Greg

wtnh
2018-08-28, 15:14
Excellent build Whit,

I like your custom power PCB idea. What software?

Hope the toroid mounting bolt doesn't touch the lid. :)

regard
Greg

I used EasyEDA: https://easyeda.com/editor

This is a completely on-line package - runs in a browser. It was the first time I had tried it, but I found it pretty straightforward. They have done a good job making it intuitive (unlike other software I have used). I used their companion board fab in China. I received 5 sample boards in just 1 week after uploading the Gerber file. Boards were ridiculously cheap but they use DHL for shipping which is ridiculously expensive ;).

One caveat - the user-contributed part libraries are a bit of a mess. I found several parts I wanted to use but the symbols were wrong (incorrect pin assignments, dimensions, etc.). This can really mess you up unless you double-check everything you choose from the libraries (or make your own symbols). As it turned out, there was one mistake on the boards which I had to correct with an "ECO wire".

Below is a photo rendering of the top of the board from the software.

Yes, the toroid bolt is a bit large and ugly (I did not use the supplied bolt because the head was not countersunk), but it does just clear the cover, as does the Boss ;).

Whit

Greg Erskine
2018-08-28, 15:54
The PCB looks good. I am a long time Eagle user but have recently changed over to KiCAD.

For my boards, less than 100x100, I use dirtypcbs.com, very cheap and postage included. You can "share your design" so others can buy them direct. This avoids distribution hassles and Australia's expensive postal system.

regards
Greg

wtnh
2018-08-28, 16:07
The PCB looks good. I am a long time Eagle user but have recently changed over to KiCAD.

For my boards, less than 100x100, I use dirtypcbs.com, very cheap and postage included. You can "share your design" so others can buy them direct. This avoids distribution hassles and Australia's expensive postal system.

regards
Greg

I would recommend EasyEDA over Eagle in a heartbeat. They have a similar business model to dirtypcbs.com - if you share your designs, it is free to use for > 2 boards. I used their partner in China for the board fab simply because it was easy to do, and the results were very good. But EasyEDA also allows you to download the Gerbers so you can use any fabricator you like.

Best,

Whit

edwin2006
2018-08-29, 08:54
How did you create the VU gauges and do they work?

Jeff07971
2018-08-29, 09:32
How did you create the VU gauges and do they work?

:rolleyes::rolleyes:

They are in Jivelite !

They work as long as the Pi the Jivelite is on is the player and you use Joggler Screen Layout

Jeff

wtnh
2018-08-29, 09:54
:rolleyes::rolleyes:

They are in Jivelite !

They work as long as the Pi the Jivelite is on is the player and you use Joggler Screen Layout

Jeff

More details - you can select the VU meter you want to be visualized in the tweaks tab on the piCorePlayer web gui. In my case, the meters are Kolossos Oval, which are pretty cool looking. You need to be running either Joggler or Grid Skin (I use Grid 800x400 currently), selected on the touch screen menu.

The meters are mostly eye candy - they do work, but there is a slight lag. I am running a Pi 3B - there are probably a little zippier on a 3B+.

Cheers

Whit

edwin2006
2018-08-29, 22:33
Thnx!

wtnh
2018-09-03, 08:28
A quick test confirmed that powering off the I2S isolator and DAC did indeed mess things up.

I used the power off button in Jivelite and then pulled the plug on the isolator and DAC. Plugging the power to the isolator and DAC back in and then using Jivelite to "power on" resulted in picoreplayer losing connection to the DAC (even though the interface looked OK - just no sound), so it looks like I will need to accomodate that in my re-design. This means another relay.

The good news is that this gives me the motivation to re-do the power supply and get rid of the eBay (i.e. China-sourced) regulator board which I never really cared for, and swap in a lower voltage toroid with Schottky rectifiers and a bigger filter cap, plus a fixed regulator. This will make the supply more efficient and reduce heat dissipation, which right now is higher than I like.

The bad news is I need to order more parts :-(.

Whit

Since Pascal's hunch that removing power from the isolator and DAC would mess things up proved correct, here is the solution. I added a third relay which applies unregulated +7 volts to the isolator and DAC while the batteries are charging. Since this is referenced to ground, the isolator is not galvanically floating, but it does not matter since the player is quiescent during the charging cycle. A 47uF cap across the power leads to the isolator serves as a "keep alive" source in the brief interval when the relays are switching. So far has proven to be completely reliable and I don't hear any audible glitches from the amplifier.

Here is the schematic. The charging module is from Amazon - they sell them in packs of 5 very inexpensively. The transformer I used is a Triad VPT12-2080 25 VA unit. Since it only puts out 6 VAC, I used Schottky rectifiers to minimize voltage drop and a hefty amount of filtering to keep the ripple on the +7 unregulated rail low. Header H2 supplies +5V to the touchscreen control board. The battery charger draws 1 amp when the batteries are fully discharged, so keeping the LDO regulator happy is a bit of a challenge; however, the +5 output never goes below 4.95V at the input to the Pi.

[a couple of errors on the component lables: the flyback diode across the relay windings is not a 1N4448, but a 1N4001GA which is a little beefier and R2 is 2.2K to ensure saturation of the Darlington when driven by the 3.3V GPIO signal via the H1 header. Also the Darlington is not a BC517 but a ZTX603 due to non-availability of the BC517]

Cheers

Whit25559

wl1
2018-09-07, 02:55
Hi -
My RPi build is in post 47. I am using the RPi official touch screen display - and all is working fine apart from the "touch". It seems really clunky, unresponsive, and unusable. Touching the volume, then moving to Play button will just go back to changing the volume, as if it didn't recognise the vertical shift. Hard to explain.

I have tried re-seating connectors, no difference, tried again and broke the ZIF off the PCB. I decided to purchase another - and this is exactly the same!

Has someone got some suggestions on the software side of things - I think when I have asked previously, everyone reported theirs just worked. I think I am missing something - so I just use it with iPeng and as a Display only. Bit frustrating though.....

Thanks

Greg Erskine
2018-09-07, 03:36
Hi

My RPi official touch screen display has always worked perfectly (until I broke it yesterday that is)

It should work properly by default using piCorePlayer once Jivelite is loaded.

I have been using it on my development pCP RPi for years, so I have installed pCP and Jivelite hundreds of times.

What skin are you using? I use Grid 800x600.

regards
Greg

wl1
2018-09-07, 04:05
Hi
What skin are you using? I use Grid 800x600.

regards
Greg

I think that's the same. I can't check atm - is that selected from the touchscreen "Settings"? Could be catch 22 for me....

wtnh
2018-09-07, 07:52
Hi -
My RPi build is in post 47. I am using the RPi official touch screen display - and all is working fine apart from the "touch". It seems really clunky, unresponsive, and unusable. Touching the volume, then moving to Play button will just go back to changing the volume, as if it didn't recognise the vertical shift. Hard to explain.

I have tried re-seating connectors, no difference, tried again and broke the ZIF off the PCB. I decided to purchase another - and this is exactly the same!

Has someone got some suggestions on the software side of things - I think when I have asked previously, everyone reported theirs just worked. I think I am missing something - so I just use it with iPeng and as a Display only. Bit frustrating though.....

Thanks

Since a new display did not correct the problem (and assuming a recent version of Jivelite), that only leaves the grid settings, the cable, the Pi itself, or maybe the power supply (how are you getting power to the display controller? - if you are using a micro usb splitter, they can be problematic - maybe try using the male pins on the diplay controller board).

Good luck.

Whit

wl1
2018-09-09, 01:50
Hi

My RPi official touch screen display has always worked perfectly (until I broke it yesterday that is)

It should work properly by default using piCorePlayer once Jivelite is loaded.

I have been using it on my development pCP RPi for years, so I have installed pCP and Jivelite hundreds of times.

What skin are you using? I use Grid 800x600.

regards
Greg
I am using the Grud Skin 800 x 480. There doesn’t appear to be a 600?

Is this correct?
25572

Greg Erskine
2018-09-09, 03:35
That's the one. As mentioned, I broke my screen and was using my memory which seems to be also broken....

arubaluba
2018-09-20, 04:44
My old Denon DRA-565 receiver died almost two years ago. After buying a new amp I was questioning what to do with the old Denon. Inspired by the examples on this forum I decided to go for a Raspberry Pi based player built into the old Denon case and using the Denon VFD to display titles, menu etc. It ended up with lots of trials, software and hardware. I spent a lot of hours reading, learning and building and I finally got to the point yesterday where I closed the case. It's not finished completely because there is still some work on the remote IR control and I want to design a PCB for the VFD driver. But it's functional with the old volume control replaced by a rotary encoder and some old buttons connected to the GPIO.

Hardware:

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B,
Hifiberry AMP,
AMB σ11 regulated power supply (12VDC),
VFD driver (own design)


Software:

piCorePlayer 3.5.0
Slimmer
LCDProc
Pikeyd
A custom Python script for serial communication to the VFD driver


Here are some pictures of the result:
25678
25679

d6jg
2018-09-20, 05:24
Brilliant. Love it.

wtnh
2018-09-21, 17:09
My old Denon DRA-565 receiver died almost two years ago. After buying a new amp I was questioning what to do with the old Denon. Inspired by the examples on this forum I decided to go for a Raspberry Pi based player built into the old Denon case and using the Denon VFD to display titles, menu etc. It ended up with lots of trials, software and hardware. I spent a lot of hours reading, learning and building and I finally got to the point yesterday where I closed the case. It's not finished completely because there is still some work on the remote IR control and I want to design a PCB for the VFD driver. But it's functional with the old volume control replaced by a rotary encoder and some old buttons connected to the GPIO.

Hardware:

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B,
Hifiberry AMP,
AMB σ11 regulated power supply (12VDC),
VFD driver (own design)


Software:

piCorePlayer 3.5.0
Slimmer
LCDProc
Pikeyd
A custom Python script for serial communication to the VFD driver


Here are some pictures of the result:
25678
25679

Really too cool. Great re-use of old technology! Congrats.

Cheers

Whit

origoreo
2018-11-24, 12:17
Lot of ideas can be use thanks for it! Though this is not easy but I'll read more and try to make my own pi system like those :)

Pascal Hibon
2018-12-22, 04:03
This is version 2 of my player. I decided I did not like the two-chassis approach and put everything into one Hammond box. In order to do this, I had to design a small PCB and get it fabricated. The PCB contains the rectifiers, filter caps and linear regulator for the +5 volt supply for the Pi. It also contains a battery charging circuit for the LiPos and a set of relays which switch the batteries between parallel (charging mode) and series (playing mode).

I use a GPIO pin from the Pi to control the relay circuit. This is set up in the piCorePlayer web interface and works in conjunction with the LMS PowerSave plugin, as suggested by Pascal (once again, thanks!). When the player is idle, the batteries are put into charge mode when LMS PowerSave times out (minimum of 15 minutes).

While playing, the batteries are completely "floating" and power the Allo isolator which sits between the Pi and the Allo Boss DAC. Thus, the DAC is galvanically isolated from the Pi and its noisy digital circuitry.

The custom PCB is the small board in the middle. You can see the TO-220 type regulator and a couple of the Schottky rectifiers bolted down to the chassis for heatsinking. The batteries are on top of the Raspberry Pi display controller board, which is flopped down to a horizontal mounting position.

Still to do - possibly add some shielding around the toroid and the output RCAs (but it is very quiet electrically). I would need some instrumentation to measure any improvements.

Whit

25543

That is a great build WTNH !!

atca
2018-12-24, 16:42
My Allo Katana build retro fit into a Sugden case, with two linear PSU.https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181224/9a52130c87be420b1178d2c272aecb29.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181224/4979ea2e45cc2bda703e300d64fe44ad.jpg