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View Full Version : Boulder 2120 DAC - $55k DLNA/UPnP Network Player! - Why is Squeezebox not viable?



ctbarker32
2015-01-14, 10:21
It boggles my mind to think that Boulder believes there is a market for $55k DLNA Network audio player/DAC that is still slower and has less features than an LMS server plus say PiCoreplayer RPi clients?

Boulder 2120 DAC (Network Player) (http://www.audiostream.com/content/boulder-2120-dac-network-player)

I don't see why Logitech and other companies can't make a success of selling potentially better spec'd featured products for way less money? I am curious that Bryston has apparently built in LMS support into one of their products (USB1) but still for about $2k.

It would seem that the network music player market continues to evolve and even heat up?

Has Logitech completely abandoned the Squeezebox marketplace? Would they ever re-enter at some date?

DaveWr
2015-01-24, 08:56
It boggles my mind to think that Boulder believes there is a market for $55k DLNA Network audio player/DAC that is still slower and has less features than an LMS server plus say PiCoreplayer RPi clients?

Boulder 2120 DAC (Network Player) (http://www.audiostream.com/content/boulder-2120-dac-network-player)

I don't see why Logitech and other companies can't make a success of selling potentially better spec'd featured products for way less money? I am curious that Bryston has apparently built in LMS support into one of their products (USB1) but still for about $2k.

It would seem that the network music player market continues to evolve and even heat up?

Has Logitech completely abandoned the Squeezebox marketplace? Would they ever re-enter at some date?

The following is all IMHO

The death knell came with no protected IPR left in the product. The only part of the product that was effectively protected nad paying for development was the Slimp/SB3 type product line. These had some custom firmware that customers couldn't clone for their own use. When the Touch came along with a Linux implementation, many of the use base, enthusiast and computer literate, could clone the operations onto other platforms. From a Logitech management perspective, what have we got left to sell? At the same time the very flexibility of the core Slimpserver/Squeezebox Server/LMS allowed a vast array of facilities but also a significant bug area. So we have Logitech with no guaranteed hardware sales and and open software suite to maintain. Frankly I wouldn't support that business model for long. Loads of enthusiasts on this site despair at the loss, but with the Picoplayer, Squeezepad and iPeng, the users have what the system was always going to evolve into from the business practice.