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Donald
2014-03-08, 08:38
I need some basic instruction in how the Duet combo works.

Does the Controller ‘talk’ to the network directly or to the Receiver via its own RF method?

What unit has a Wi-Fi connection, the Controller or the Receiver?

Which unit has an IP assigned , the Receiver or the Controller? How can I force a specific IP?

In the case of multiple Duet combos, does the software on the PC care which Duet combo it is ‘talking’ to? I know there is a Sync capability for multiple units.

Can I have one Duet wired and one Duet wireless using the same music PC?

jimbobvfr400
2014-03-08, 11:28
Once set up and connected to the network each device whether a receiver or controller is a completely independent device. Any controller could be used to control any player, including other SB hardware like a Touch, SB3 etc and any receiver can be used as an independent player controlled via the web interface, app on a phone/tablet or even by a Touch, Radio or even the Squeezeplay software on a computer.

The receiver does need configuring to connect to the network initially which is why without a controller it can be painful but it is possible to set them up by connecting directly to a PC and using a command line utility, the name of which I've forgotten. Normally setup would be with a controller connecting directly via WiFi to the receiver, the receiver however would then be connected to the network.

There is an option during setup where you can leave the controller connected wirelessly to the receiver, this is to allow it to be used where you don't have WiFi available, but I'd suggest this wouldirrelevant best way to use it.

Once setup the particular connection any player use's is irrelevant really.


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Swiftie
2014-03-08, 23:08
During initial setup, the controller "talks" directly to the player by what is known as an "Ad Hoc" IP network. The protocol is inefficient, and it would run your controller battery down quickly, so you need to get the setup task done, and then move on.

In normal use, you have the Media Server running on a system on your local network. The controller "talks" to this server, and in turn, the server instructs the player(s) what to do.
Once you've got some music playing, you could turn off the controller and everything would be happy (with the possible exception of my wife coming in and telling me to "stop playing that Led Zeppelin"; which without the controller on, I couldn't do)
Both controller and player are network connected; I have IP names "controller" and "player" setup, so I can ping them to verify connectivity.

AFAIK there is no direct communication between the controller and the player in normal use, but you don't need to care about this... it "just works".

Usually, both controller and player use WiFi and get their IP addresses via DHCP. Most routers can reserve a fixed IP address for a given device (i.e. MAC Address). I use this, so my IP names "controller" and "player" keep working. Both my controller and player connect via DHCP, but they always get the same IP addresses assigned by my router. So the controller is always 192.168.1.101 and the player always 192.168.1.102

The Server on your PC (or similar device) runs the players, once it has been instructed by a controller, by sending data to the player(s). If you have multiple players (even different devices) then the server will be sending data to any of these which are actually playing at the time. So, the PC Server cares passionately about which player(s) it talks to. This is it's main purpose!

Nothing cares whether the players are connected via WiFi or wired Ethernet. You may encounter problems with WiFi (bandwidth, signal strength, reliability) and your use of a wired connection would depend on this. The wired Ethernet can be DHCP or Fixed IP address. This is the only example of a true Static IP address in the Duet system, I think.

In a nutshell: The controller(s) job is to instruct the server, and it's the server's job to feed data to the player(s). Your job is to poke the buttons on the controller and to enjoy the music. You don't need to be connected to the network personally. :-)

RonM
2014-03-09, 10:34
As I recall, one of the setup options for the Duet is a hybrid wireless/ethernet mode. This would be used where there was no wireless network, and the Receiver was hard-wired via ethernet to the device with the server (a computer of some sort). The Controller still needs to communicate with the server, but does so through the Receiver -- Controller connects to Receiver via wifi, then through the Receiver to the server via ethernet.

This is not as good as having a wireless network. I recall that the Controller does not maintain as secure and reliable a wifi connection to the Receiver as it would to a wireless network. Not sure there is a battery-rundown issue in the Controller, as presumably the wifi takes just as much power connecting to the Receiver as to a network, but I might be wrong about that.

Bottom line is that it's best to use a wifi network to connect the Controller to the server, but you can do so through the Receiver if necessary.

All of this is aside from any required direct controller-receiver connection during initial setup.

R

Donald
2014-03-09, 10:59
Thanks for the info. As soon as I figure out how to tell the router to assign specific IP to the controller and receiver I will be set.

jimbobvfr400
2014-03-09, 12:15
It'll most probably be labeled DHCP Reservation or something like it, you assign the IP via the devices MAC address do make a note of those as well.

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Swiftie
2014-03-09, 23:51
Just a word of caution about DHCP Reservation:

My router has a limit of 8 devices in this table. I ran out recently, and it took me some time to deduce which ones were no longer used.

So now, I allocate a name to reserved devices, and save the IP Address/Name pair in my hosts file. So I know what's what (http://www.swiftys.org.uk/whatswhat.html).

wickerbill
2014-03-11, 09:17
Thanks for the info. As soon as I figure out how to tell the router to assign specific IP to the controller and receiver I will be set.

This isn't really necessary. I've been using my duet for five years with random IP addresses assigned through DHCP by my router. I have never had a problem with it not working correctly.

Donald
2014-03-11, 14:24
This isn't really necessary. I've been using my duet for five years with random IP addresses assigned through DHCP by my router. I have never had a problem with it not working correctly.

I have a set of IP cams that need fixed IP so they can be accessed via the web. They are not actually attached now so the IPs appear available and get assigned to the Duet. I need to fix the Duet IPs so I don't have a conflict later.

I got the IPs assigned to the Duet pair and a Wi-Fi printers using the tables in the router.

Next challenge: add a 2nd Duet.

Mnyb
2014-03-11, 21:51
Re ip reservation as you have noticed its really two indipendent devices .

So controller and reciever part may need one reservation each .

Another way to avoid ip conflicts or potentally buggy dhcp is static ip settings in some devices ( no dhcp used there ) and then limit the dhcp range so that those adresses are avoided .

I find that usefull as some of my devices are directly conected via the switches i have and woulf not depend on the router working properly .

jimbobvfr400
2014-03-12, 03:16
Normally it is possible to set the range that DHCP uses for its automatically assigned addresses. You would then make sure any you set manually or by reservation are outside that range.

For example my router is set to adding from 192.168.1.101 and above. I then use addresses below 100 for fixed stuff. This would stop your cameras IP being assigned to something else.

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Mnyb
2014-03-12, 03:23
Normally it is possible to set the range that DHCP uses for its automatically assigned addresses. You would then make sure any you set manually or by reservation are outside that range.

For example my router is set to adding from 192.168.1.101 and above. I then use addresses below 100 for fixed stuff. This would stop your cameras IP being assigned to something else.

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Yeah but you probably have to set static ip reserving dchp outside dhcp range would maybe not work on all routers .

The drawback with static setup is that you have to know ip,subnet,dns,network,gateway beforehand.

dhcp is user friendly

jimbobvfr400
2014-03-12, 04:54
Yeah but you probably have to set static ip reserving dchp outside dhcp range would maybe not work on all routers .

The drawback with static setup is that you have to know ip,subnet,dns,network,gateway beforehand.

dhcp is user friendly

I find on one of my routers I have to reserve within the DHCP range and then change the range leaving the reservation in place. That was a faff, luckily I changed routers and now don't have to do that.

I have all my reserved and static stuff using multiples of 10 in the main, and these addresses have tended to stick in my mind so I'm reluctant to change them. It would take me ages to remember the correct number if I did.

The other advantage for me at least is that my router that does DHCP and connects to broadband only has a switch connected to it, no other devices are connected directly. All squeezebox stuff that has a proper fixed IP can essentially work independently. So if I'm playing local files I can still reboot my router as necessary without stopping playback or access to my NAS.

Going back on topic, I would say unless you have a good reason reserving or setting manual addresses is not normally necessary. I do it for specific reasons only, mainly because they are devices I want to access in some way or other by IP (for example SSH, telnet or a web interface like LMS)

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