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dagadog
2014-02-18, 06:08
Hi Forum

I have been running LMS (and predecessors) on a ReadyNAS NV+ since about 2009. It works well (apart from the fan noise) but I'm looking for a more powerful device so I can run more services simultaneously (mail server etc.) I trust the ReadyNAS name and have the SSH and APT add-ins installed, and run Ubuntu on my main PC, so am comfortable getting under-the-hood if necessary, but don't have a huge amount of time to tinker with things to make them work. I'd rather use a version of LMS 7.8 packaged specifically for the NAS rather than rolling it myself.

Any experiences you can share will be gratefully received.

aubuti
2014-02-18, 07:42
My recommendation would be to forget about a box marketed as a NAS and instead get a small computer to use as a headless server. It will give you a lot more flexibility, especially given your comfort level under-the-hood. Get hardware like one of the units in this link. Then add RAM and hard drive to your needs, install Ubuntu, configure things like Samba (file sharing), sshd, LMS, etc. and away you go. If you're using Ubuntu on the server, the Debian LMS package is every bit as convenient to install as the ReadyNAS LMS. And I dare say that as official support from Logitech wanes, the likelihood of a Debian version continuing in the community is greater than the odds of continued ReadyNAS NV support.

And if you don't want to install RAM or a hard drive, just buy a small pc without an operating system and install Ubuntu on it.

dagadog
2014-02-18, 08:28
Get hardware like one of the units in this link.

Thanks, that's something I've been thinking about too (is there a link missing?) Yes, I'd be happy adding disks and RAM, and of course no limitations on installing/upgrading software. Are there boxes with a hardware RAID controller for 4 disks? I could also use hotswap and the ability to increase the raid volume dynamically by adding bigger disks.

aubuti
2014-02-18, 08:37
Sorry, I forgot to paste the link. This is just one set of options. Of course there are many others. http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=bare+bone&N=100006668&isNodeId=1

I've never seriously looked into RAID, as a single 1TB drive is plenty for my needs, and I don't need 100% uptime for my music library. If/when the drive dies I can use the backup copy that's kept on a separate NAS until I can replace the dead drive, or fetch the backup I keep off-site on a USB drive.

dagadog
2014-02-18, 11:32
The RAID is important to me, and has proven its worth hen one of the disks on the NV+ failed catastrophically without me loosing any data. I use it to store exported video from my PVR , and streaming it back to the TV using the miniDLNA server. And I also use it as a general NAS for storing data, which includes at the moment my kmail maildirs.

I used to have everything running on my PC (it is 10 years old this year) but a hard disk failure in 2008 which made me re-evaluate.

That said, maybe I should google "DIY NAS" for my next project. I could even bung a CD/DVD/BluRay drive in it and set it up to rip CDs to FLAC automatically on insertion....

aubuti
2014-02-18, 11:52
That said, maybe I should google "DIY NAS" for my next project. I could even bung a CD/DVD/BluRay drive in it and set it up to rip CDs to FLAC automatically on insertion....
For that you may want to look into the Vortexbox software, which is a distro based on Fedora Linux and focused on network audio devices (includes LMS, auto-ripping and tagging software, etc.).

I hope you have a true backup in addition to the RAID. RAID provides redundancy, so you can make a quick switch when a hard drive dies. But it's useless for other risks such as a failed controller card, RAID software failure, electricity spike, fire, flood, theft, or the ever-popular user error. As they say, RAID!=backup.

DJanGo
2014-02-18, 15:00
The RAID is important to me, and has proven its worth hen one of the disks on the NV+ failed catastrophically without me loosing any data

Bah:mad:

RAID on a Consumer Home Stuff isnt realy a good idea...

Let me explain (i do really know what i am talking about)

RAID is no Backup
RAID is always powerful -powerful means heat and heat means FANs and Fans means Noise.

If you delete / something on a Raid its gone

If someone breaks into your home and takes one case with your spinning RAID 10 or whatever Harddisks - theyre gone 4ever (trust me ive had this worstcase in real life)

A real Hardware Raid NAS is mostly 19" - you didnt wanna have this @ your dining room.

Just use a simple older Notebook or a used cheap minimac buy some spare usb Harddisks and wrote a simple backupscript and place the backup in another place.
I am using a smal (very old aopen minimac lookalike with a celeron 1.6 and 2 Gb Ram - that fine enough)

dagadog
2014-02-19, 17:34
I can see what you're saying, yes. On the other hand I want a RAID based headless NAS/home server. I have one already, and it has served its purpose, and now I'd like a new one, and I really don't want to build one from scratch if I can help it.

aubuti
2014-02-19, 19:13
It's certainly possible to put together a box that holds 4 drives, a RAID controller, and adequate ventilation (usually a big fan or two). None of the barebones computers in the link posted earlier would fit the bill, but there are others out there. Whether you go for a closed system that works out of the box like your ReadyNAS or a more open system that puts you in control is up to you. In general the pre-packaged consumer NASs cost more per unit of computing power than standard computer configured as a NAS.

Even if you have a big RAID NAS you still need a proper backup (including off-site) or you're just flirting with disaster.

dagadog
2014-02-20, 04:20
Agreed re backups. What prompted the desire to upgrade was the failure of my backup disk. A full backup to the replacement took over 18 hours (NV+ is USB2?) and I don't have an off-site facility. Part of my strategy is to use the decomissioned NAS as a backup repository possibly located at someone else's house and accessed over the Internet via VPN.

I'm pretty sure I'd get more out of a roll-your-own system based on a headless Ubuntu server, and comments about flexibility and ongoing support/maintenance of are appreciated. It's just a matter of available time. Having said that my PC (built 2004) is still going strong so chances are I wouldn't have to do it again for 10 years or so. I'll give it some more thought.

Pascal Hibon
2014-02-24, 11:47
Hi Forum

I have been running LMS (and predecessors) on a ReadyNAS NV+ since about 2009. It works well (apart from the fan noise) but I'm looking for a more powerful device so I can run more services simultaneously (mail server etc.) I trust the ReadyNAS name and have the SSH and APT add-ins installed, and run Ubuntu on my main PC, so am comfortable getting under-the-hood if necessary, but don't have a huge amount of time to tinker with things to make them work. I'd rather use a version of LMS 7.8 packaged specifically for the NAS rather than rolling it myself.

Any experiences you can share will be gratefully received.

I'm a happy user of a ReadyNAS NVX. To me ReadyNAS is the only brand that provides excellent value for the money. You get a pro device at consumer prices. Just make sure to select a NAS with decent power. The ReadyNAS R314 looks like a nice model.

Alternativly, you could keep your NV+ and by a Wandboard. Run CSOS (http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?99395-Community-Squeeze-OS-F19-Release-1) on the Wandboard and put your NV+ somewhere where it can make all the noise in the world.

aspendl828
2014-02-26, 10:23
I have just bought a QNAP TS-420. Just over 250 from Amazon in the UK. I have been using an NV+ but the maximum drive size was an issue. I did try using the NV+ to run LMS but it wasn't powerful enough to transcode hi-res files down to my SB+ and Boom so moved LMS to a PC.
LMS is a downloadable app for the QNAP but I haven't yet tried it.
Overall it feels a much more robust piece of kit that the Netgear.

Hope that helps.

bomboloni
2014-02-26, 14:07
I was using a NetGear ReadyNAS Duo for a few years and like you I got tired of how slow it was. This year I upgraded to a ReadyNAS Ultra 2 Plus which is x86 based dual core processor and I've been thrilled with my choice. As others have mentioned it is significantly faster than the sparc-based Duo. I had always heard that it was faster, but I was shocked at the difference.

It is important to note that the Ultra 2 Plus has been discontinued, but because of that you can get some deals. I also took the opportunity to upgrade from 1tb to 2tb drives. I have used ReadyNAS for a long time, and have also been happy with its performance.

There are guides out there on how to upgrade fro Sparc to X86: http://www.readynas.com/contributed/mdgm/UnofficialGuideformovingfromSparcReadyNAStox86Read yNASv0.5.pdf

I found the process very simple, and I upgraded to LMS 7.8 and everything has been running beautifully ever since.

Ben

dagadog
2014-02-28, 12:27
It is important to note that the Ultra 2 Plus has been discontinued, but because of that you can get some deals. I also took the opportunity to upgrade from 1tb to 2tb drives. I have used ReadyNAS for a long time, and have also been happy with its performance.

Ben

Thanks for the advice, Ben. I'm not sure exactly what I'm going to do now :confused: It's the desire to "do more" then just file sharing and LMS that is driving me towards an Ubuntu based server.

I have started to spec out a MiniITX system based on a dual core Atom CPU. I found a nice board with 6 SATAII ports and a case with 4 front-loading hot-swappable drive bays. I'd probably go for 1TB disks in RAID5 to match the current capacity of the NV+ which is currently less than 17% utilised - The NV+ can then sit there replicating the new box with rsync, and running no other services. Or I might future proof it with 2TB drives, and grow the NV+ when needed to support the bigger backup.

JJZolx
2014-02-28, 23:22
For a little more CPU power, you might want to consider Intel Celeron 1037U based motherboards.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813138393

Not sure if you'll find a similarly priced board with six SATA ports, though, as the NM70 chipset only support four. Some server-ish motherboards may have additional disk controllers on them (like the Atom board you're looking at), but will be pricier.

If you're not aware of it, have a look at the Fractal Design Node 304 miniITX chassis, which holds six 3.5" drives in a compact package, although they're not in hotswap bays.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811352027

dagadog
2014-03-01, 04:09
Both good recommendations of kit, but one of the attractions of the Atom board is the low energy draw (~20W) and that it is fanless. The other one is that it has 6 built in SATA ports so I can have my OS and data on separate disks without buying an additional hard disk controller. And it has the CPU included in the price.

For the case, I'm getting one of these....

http://linitx.com/product/cfi-a7879-miniitx-nasserver-case-4-hot-swap-bays/12789

It's the front access to the drive bays rather than the hot-swappable capability. I really don't like delving around inside computer cases if I can avoid it, and having swapped hard-drives on my PC several times, if I can make it easy on myself, that's what I'd prefer to do. (clumsy engineer's hands).