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swayzak
2014-02-09, 03:49
Hi

I have an extended network via homeplug, both labelled identically eg. "my network"..

Should they also share the same wifi channel, or different channels ?

I am having some issues and wonder whether they shouldn't be on the same channel...

Thanks

jeremy
2014-02-09, 06:05
Different channels would be best, I have 3 channels here all with same SSID network name, devices just chose the strongest signal where they are

swayzak
2014-02-09, 06:17
Thanks

But what if LMS is running on a laptop connecting to network on different channel number to player - would that cause a problem ?

garym
2014-02-09, 06:25
Thanks

But what if LMS is running on a laptop connecting to network on different channel number to player - would that cause a problem ?

Not a problem. The channel does not "define" the network. I use same SSID and password but different channels.

swayzak
2014-02-09, 09:09
Thanks

I'll give it a go then..

pbroughton
2014-02-10, 20:21
Could someone help me understand the issues/consequences if all the channels are the same? Mine seem to work ok, but maybe that's just a fluke?????

thanks

swayzak
2014-02-10, 23:40
Cautiously optimistic - network seems more stable on different channels...

DJanGo
2014-02-11, 00:09
Could someone help me understand the issues/consequences if all the channels are the same? Mine seem to work ok, but maybe that's just a fluke?????

thanks

quite simple...

the channels are the frequency the systems talking about.
If you know something about rc modells - its strictly forbidden to use on a rc flightplace two sender with the same band - cause then both senders operate two different modells and both will crash (one says go up another go left and none of them will fly left or up they will fly left and up)

or simpler: If you talking to a group with two others if one is a male and the other is a female you can "handle" who say what. If in the next corner some other wifes a giggling like hell you just hear the male next to you not the female.

And then its communication - both reciever and sender are using the same frequency if you had to much "speech" on one channel pakets gone lost and had to repeat sending again.

pbroughton
2014-02-12, 18:18
Thanks for the additional info regarding having different channels on the same network.

I have a router, a range extender and a homeplug wifi, all on 6.

After reading this and seeing the response from others, I researched this on the net; without doing an exact count, I would say that is 60/40 toward using the same channel for all elements of the network. This includes reading numerous manufacturer's manuals, FAQs and HELP forums.

Have I missed reading about a clear conclusion of what works 'the best'?

Thanks for any further discussion or a lead to a conclusive recommendation.


thanks

garym
2014-02-12, 20:54
Thanks for the additional info regarding having different channels on the same network.

I have a router, a range extender and a homeplug wifi, all on 6.

After reading this and seeing the response from others, I researched this on the net; without doing an exact count, I would say that is 60/40 toward using the same channel for all elements of the network. This includes reading numerous manufacturer's manuals, FAQs and HELP forums.

Have I missed reading about a clear conclusion of what works 'the best'?

Thanks for any further discussion or a lead to a conclusive recommendation.


thanks

I haven't done a detailed study of this, but when setting up my own 2nd wifi access point in my house (actually in two different houses), the instruction I read always said clearly to put the 2nd WIFI AP on a different channel, but to use same SSID and pw, so my devices could move seamlessly between the APs. I've had it setup this way for several years with no issues whatsoever. If the devices are far enough apart, perhaps same channel is not a problem. Any potential problem would be from channel/frequency interference. Whether same channel or different channels, all these things are on the *same* network that allows wired, wireless, etc. devices to all talk to each other. The channel doesn't define the "network".

swayzak
2014-02-13, 01:30
Well touch wood, my network has been better since moving over to different channels.

I guess, despite being the same SSID / password, the 2 networks are different physical networks which a device has to link to & communicate through. And defined by the SSID, not the channel number as you say.

Avoiding shared channels with your neighbours (to minimise interference issues) would also apply to this situation ?

kesey
2014-02-13, 03:07
Avoiding shared channels with your neighbours (to minimise interference issues) would also apply to this situation ?

Yes, depending on how far away they are.

If you have an Android phone,down load Wifi Analyser. You'll see what wifi networks are in your vicinity, what channels they are on etc. There's probably a similar iOS app

swayzak
2014-02-13, 03:22
Yes, depending on how far away they are.

If you have an Android phone,down load Wifi Analyser. You'll see what wifi networks are in your vicinity, what channels they are on etc. There's probably a similar iOS app

That's exactly what I use already - and obviously showed very strong signals from both my networks on the same channel number. If different devices are connected to the "separate" networks (despite sharing same SSID/password) then I would suspect interference could be an issue.

Now the strong signals are on different channels (1 & 6), and this also seems to "dissuade" neighbours from sharing these channels (I assume at least some of there routers are set to "auto" channel select) - these seem to piling up on channel 11 now.

garym
2014-02-13, 04:57
That's exactly what I use already - and obviously showed very strong signals from both my networks on the same channel number. If different devices are connected to the "separate" networks (despite sharing same SSID/password) then I would suspect interference could be an issue.

Now the strong signals are on different channels (1 & 6), and this also seems to "dissuade" neighbours from sharing these channels (I assume at least some of there routers are set to "auto" channel select) - these seem to piling up on channel 11 now.

correct, auto select would try to use the least congested/nearby channel. (p.s., I know you are using it in quotes and understand what it means, but to be clear for other readers of this thread, your devices are all connecting to the *same* network not "separate networks sharing same ssid/pw. Keep in mind that even things not connected to WIFI at all (ethernet connected) are still connected to the same network as all your wifi connected devices.

EDIT: auto channel select for wifi is *not* a good idea for using when you have squeezebox devices. best to use 1, 6, 11 (as these don't overlap) and don't use > 11, even if in a country that has this.

reinholdk
2014-02-13, 05:20
In addition to the correct points garym made:

All devices communicating over a certain channel have to share the limited bandwidth of that channel and have to avoid collisions while talking. So the more clients are talking on a channel the less throughput can be expected. And the different channels are partly overlapping, which can decrease performance further. The only non-overlapping channels in the 2.4GHz range are the 1, 6 and 11.

So if you have different APs, try to use different channels - but this also depends on how many WiFis are in your neighborhood and on which channels they're talking.

Mnyb
2014-02-13, 13:21
Pay some attention to which AP your squeezebox actually is connected to ,they are not known to have a very good roaming function , especially the controller you may have to force it to reconnect sometimes .

pbroughton
2014-02-13, 20:17
Thanks for the added info.

I will be trying 1,6, & 11 in lieu of 6 on each.

I'll use Wifi Analytics to document any changes room by room to satisfy my own curiosity.

thanks again.

Edit: HELP!!

I am using the Securifi Almond Router set up as a Range Extender. The FAQ/Support has the following:
=============
Q: Why can’t I change the wireless channel of my Almond when it’s used in Range Extender mode?
A: In Range Extender mode, the Almond must be synched with the main router’s channel. If the Almond’s channel is changed independently, it will no
longer be able to extend the range.
================

Anyone have any thoughts? thanks

Mnyb
2014-02-13, 22:21
Thanks for the added info.

I will be trying 1,6, & 11 in lieu of 6 on each.

I'll use Wifi Analytics to document any changes room by room to satisfy my own curiosity.

thanks again.

Edit: HELP!!

I am using the Securifi Almond Router set up as a Range Extender. The FAQ/Support has the following:
=============
Q: Why can’t I change the wireless channel of my Almond when it’s used in Range Extender mode?
A: In Range Extender mode, the Almond must be synched with the main router’s channel. If the Almond’s channel is changed independently, it will no
longer be able to extend the range.
================

Anyone have any thoughts? thanks

Why not wire it to the main router , range extending works it does just that but the speed gets at least 1/2 of the original if not worse .
Multiple AP's usually means that they are all wired together .

reinholdk
2014-02-14, 06:32
Performance-wise, using a range extender or repeater is a bad thing as the data is sent twice: from the router to the repeater and from the repeater to the client (and back).

Of course, sometimes the alternatives are limited due to location restrictions. If you cannot use a directly-wired AP, consider powerline network adapters.

And it looks the Almond can also be used in AP mode (if it's the model mentioned here: http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/32029-securifi-almond-reviewed).

DJanGo
2014-02-14, 12:54
I would say that is 60/40 toward using the same channel for all elements of the network.

I do know - that 60 or 40% didnt have a clue what they talking about (depends on 60% for using the same channel or 60% to not do it that way.)



In Range Extender mode, the Almond must be synched with the main router’s channel.

Mööööp....

You / Nobody can use Channel A on the Sender and Channel B on the Receiver (very simple) and always remember all systems are sender and receiver!
Even a Client is answering "yep i got a paket with serial#xyz from you" after the "server" sends that paket.

The "only" way to manage that is both APs are connected via cable / but thats not "repeater mode".

The all in one answer is - if your "client" (to not using the phrase sender/receiver) is in the middle of two "AP" they using the same channel - the "client" may sends a paket (question) to AP1 - connects to AP2 and asks for the answer (that AP2 couldnt send cause he didnt know the question - so the client is told to ask the question again)


"answer" and "question" are symbolic!
Just believe us and dont ask further questions (edit) in this context (/edit) - the osi Layer modell and all other stuff are very very hardcore even for peoples that had studied that kind of networking in the deep. (means theoreticals and also Guys from Practice)