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  1. #1
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    Hybrid Wireless solution - What hardware

    Where my SBT located, I can basically only use wifi as the connection to LMS. Learning from some threads, it seems that some finds benefit (in terms of SQ) from using a wireless bridge/AP/Client(?) (Box B) to deal with the wifi connection to the first wifi router (Box A) and then connect from Box B to SBT via ethernet cables. I think that would be a good idea for my set-up, since it would be also nice to have wired network access near that area for things like set-top boxes, etc., not to mention the potential extra stability and speed brought by a wireless-N device. However, when I went shopping for such Box B from my local computer shops, they seem quite puzzled as to what router/AP would do that (i.e. connecting wirelessly to the home wireless network and feeding cables to machines) while I have a feeling that it should not be rocket science.

    What feature should I look for in a device for it to act as Box B? Any recommendation on models (hopefully inexpensive) from key manufacturers like Cisco, D-link, TP-Link, Buffalo, Asus? Would a simple device like Buffalo's WCR-GN do? It has a WDS bridge mode.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by eduardoo; 2012-03-07 at 00:12.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by eduardoo View Post
    Where my SBT located, I can basically only use wifi as the connection to LMS. Learning from some threads, it seems that some finds benefit (in terms of SQ) from using a wireless bridge/AP/Client(?) (Box B) to deal with the wifi connection to the first wifi router (Box A) and then connect from Box B to SBT via ethernet cables. I think that would be a good idea for my set-up, since it would be also nice to have wired network access near that area for things like set-top boxes, etc., not to mention the potential extra stability and speed brought by a wireless-N device. However, when I went shopping for such Box B from my local computer shops, they seem quite puzzled as to what router/AP would do that (i.e. connecting wirelessly to the home wireless network and feeding cables to machines) while I have a feeling that it should not be rocket science.

    What feature should I look for in a device for it to act as Box B? Any recommendation on models (hopefully inexpensive) from key manufacturers like Cisco, D-link, TP-Link, Buffalo, Asus? Would a simple device like Buffalo's WCR-GN do? It has a WDS bridge mode.

    Thanks.
    I'm going to recommend the Trendnet TEW-650AP, its $40 and works great for this purpose. What makes it work for this application is that it supports AP client mode. That "client" is the important part. That means it can be configured as a client for an existing wireless network.

    There are two ways to configure the box, windows software that comes on the CD, or with a web browser. The software on the CD is the easiest way to do it, AS LONG as you follow the instructions for setting it up in AP client mode. Ignore the quick setup guide, it is for using the box as a straight access point. Rather read the user guide (on the CD) and follow the instructions for AP client mode. Just for the setup you will connect the box to your existing router with a cable. Put the CD into a drive in a computer that is already connected to the router with a cable, read the user guide and run the setup wizard, this connects to the box, you do the configuration with the wizard, THEN you can unplug the box from the router and put it where you want and it will act as bridge for whatever you plug into the ethernet jack.

    Note that this box just has one ethernet jack. If you want to plug more than one wired device into it you will need a switch. (I personally prefer the Netgear FS-105, its built like a tank and works forever)

    This box has many different modes in which you can use it. The important part is to just focus on the AP client mode and ignore all the other ways it can be used and you should be fine.

    John S.

  3. #3
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    Trendnet also makes the TEW-640MB which is exactly what you want, its a 4 port "media bridge". Its $70 but it has a builtin 4 port switch. Since its just a client mode bridge, its less confusing to setup. Note I have not used this box so I can't vouch for it, but if its built to the same standards as the other Trendnet boxes I have it should do well.

    John S.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnSwenson View Post
    Trendnet also makes the TEW-640MB which is exactly what you want, its a 4 port "media bridge". Its $70 but it has a builtin 4 port switch. Since its just a client mode bridge, its less confusing to setup. Note I have not used this box so I can't vouch for it, but if its built to the same standards as the other Trendnet boxes I have it should do well.

    John S.
    I was about to ask you whether you had experience of 'AP Client mode' vs 'AP Bridge mode' and then I saw this post.

    I have gained an impression that, in general terms, 'AP Client mode' is used for attaching a single PC by ethernet cable, and that 'AP Bridge mode' is used to connect many PC's, e.g. through a switch as this device seems to do.

    I have no practical knowledge of this. To me they both sound rather the same. Are they in fact the same thing ?

  5. #5
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    Thanks, guys.

    When I went shopping, it seems that manufacturers tend to call the same things differently or different things the same, and the sales people seems pretty clueless as to what would fit the bill.

    I don't seem to have seen Trendnet equipment in my region. On the other hand, it seems that TP-link WR743ND and Dlink DAP1522 should be able to do what I intend to do. Would you mind taking a look and see if my understanding is right?

    Thanks again.

  6. #6
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    Any router capable of running DD-WRT/Tomato/etc will fit your needs too..

    -- Sent from my Palm Veer using Forums

  7. #7
    Senior Member Soulkeeper's Avatar
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    +1

    I rely heavily on a Linksys E2000 (actually an "upgraded" WRT320N) with DD-WRT 16785 as a wireless client, and it works reliably.

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