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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by d6jg View Post
    My point was that Sonos had started to become accepted in the consumer electronics field just as Logitech pulled out.
    Yes. Only a different subset of the consumers than the Squeezeboxes caters to. The fact that there was enough buyers to support Sonos doesn't suggest that there would have been enough to keep the Squeezebox going IMHO.

  2. #22
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    Sonos also made the executive decision to cripple their digital outputs, for reasons no one can fathom; nor do they seem interested in sorting it out.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    --
    Hardware: 3x Touch, 1x Radio, 2x Receivers, 1 HP Microserver NAS with Debian+LMS 7.9.0
    Music: ~1300 CDs, as 450 GB of 16/44k FLACs. No less than 3x 24/44k albums..

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmatt View Post
    Sonos also made the executive decision to cripple their digital outputs, for reasons no one can fathom; nor do they seem interested in sorting it out.
    And that must have cost them about five sales or something?
    I honestly don't think the majority of potential Sonos buyers know, much less care.
    Wouldn't know if there's an uside somewhere, but since I doubt there's any downside from Sonos' perspective, even the slightest advantage would make it the right decision.

  4. #24
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    One of the most attractive aspects of Squeezebox is the ability to use it (server and hardware) with high definition music, if one wants to. I have an optical connection to my stereo and have really loved the ability to listen to my surround sound music. There are things I wouldn't mind being better, but no one else is doing it at this point either.

    I am encouraged by the continued support and development of the LMS, and with the ability to use a PI device, I don't see a need for Logitech to resurrect the system.

    I could see frustration for people that may not have the inclination to build their own system with a PI, but I suspect there will be those who will potentially provide a service of building such devices that could take advantage of LMS or even other server software that is out there.

    I have to admit that I do slightly fear a discontinuation of LMS from the standpoint that I do not see any other similar media servers with the full suite of features LMS has. There are those that the individual features I find important (full featured library or high definition audio) but few provide all the features. I only wish I had the time to contribute more myself; my job swallows all my time but my devices and LMS allow me to move along happily.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Mnyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmatt View Post
    Sonos also made the executive decision to cripple their digital outputs, for reasons no one can fathom; nor do they seem interested in sorting it out.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    Probably due to old tech .
    more than 16/44.1 does not really do anything for anyone .
    It increases bandwith usage . One of Sonos bragging points is there mesh network that practically configure itself .
    You can be a computer numpty and it sort of works anyway .

    LMS and wifi also works , if you have a decent network how many treads do we have with "my wifi is perfect" and I still have rebuffering songs quit etc .....
    And squeezeboxes are kind of weak in the wifi department :/ not on par with what you can do today . Rpi3 is not that good for wifi either .
    Anyhow some stubborn fellow wants to sync 24/192 pcm over 5 players and comes to our forum.....
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Main hifi: Touch + CIA PS +MeridianG68J MeridianHD621 MeridianG98DH 2 x MeridianDSP5200 MeridianDSP5200HC 2 xMeridianDSP3100 +Rel Stadium 3 sub.
    Bedroom/Office: Boom
    Kitchen: Touch + powered Fostex PM0.4
    Misc use: Radio (with battery)
    iPad1 with iPengHD & SqueezePad
    (spares Touch, SB3, reciever ,controller )
    server HP proliant micro server N36L with ClearOS Linux

    http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mnyb View Post
    Anyhow some stubborn fellow wants to sync 24/192 pcm over 5 players and comes to our forum.....
    Hah, works for me....


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    --
    Hardware: 3x Touch, 1x Radio, 2x Receivers, 1 HP Microserver NAS with Debian+LMS 7.9.0
    Music: ~1300 CDs, as 450 GB of 16/44k FLACs. No less than 3x 24/44k albums..

  7. #27
    Senior Member toby10's Avatar
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    The story goes much deeper than we’ll ever know. I'm sure Michael Herger knows all the dirt but is unable say so publicly.

    What little we do know……. Soon after Logitech acquired SlimDevices there was a major reshuffling of managers and department personnel at Logitech. The few individuals at Logitech that had even the slightest clue and interest in SlmDevices and it’s ecosystem were shuffled around and I suspect eventually even out of Logitech. Some of the core SlimDevices personel and developers were also cycled out. A couple more corporate reshufflings and the entire SqueezeBox idea became the red headed step child at Logitech. First ignored, then diminished, finally axed all together.

    They struggled to market it properly as well. The same brand stores (like a Best Buy) in different regions had the SB players in different product/shelf categories. Some displayed them in the computer speakers area, others in the keyboard/mouse area, some others still in the TV/stereo area. Some had stock, some didn’t, some with stock did not know what shelf to find them on, and if found coudlnt explain what it was capable of or how it worked. It was a mess. I suspect various regional Logitech reps with varying degree of knowledge and interest of the SB product had a lot to do with it’s confusing product placement issues.

    A niche product for (mostly) home stereo use being marketed by a behemouth keyboard/mouse conglomerate in a fast growing consumer environment that wanted on demand music services on their phones with earbuds and satisfied with compressed audio over BlueTooth (also absent on SB devices)…. Was a recipe for disaster.

    For SlimDevices it was the perfect time to sell. Taking into account Logitech’s business model it was the wrong time for Logitech to buy.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by toby10 View Post
    For SlimDevices it was the perfect time to sell. Taking into account Logitech’s business model it was the wrong time for Logitech to buy.
    Logitech were, and always would have been, the wrong company to buy Slim Devices. Their core businesses were just miles apart.

    The Squeezebox system was never going to become successful in the mass-market. Its topology required a certain level of insight on the user's part. IMHO the best way for it to have survived and grown would have been to licence the technology to established audio manufacturers such as Sony, Yamaha, Marantz, Cambridge, Meridian, Linn, McIntosh and the like. The cachet of those names would have boosted its standing. Slim Devices could have become a supplier of effectively OEM modules to be incorporated into devices such as preamps and optical disc players. (No doubt the greedier vendors such as Naim would have just bunged the SD module in a box on its own and flogged it as yet another source component at 100x the price of the module, but it would still have the desired effect of legitimizing the technology).

    There was a brief window of opportunity about a decade back where SlimProto could have become the defacto streaming mechanism around the industry, but it would have taken a heck of a lot of work. Can't blame Sean, Dean and the gang for taking the cash when it was on offer, even though they probably knew it was being taken on by the wrong company.
    Transporter -> ATC SCM100A

  9. #29
    Senior Member Mnyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmatt View Post
    Hah, works for me....


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    .. with wifi i forgot that
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Main hifi: Touch + CIA PS +MeridianG68J MeridianHD621 MeridianG98DH 2 x MeridianDSP5200 MeridianDSP5200HC 2 xMeridianDSP3100 +Rel Stadium 3 sub.
    Bedroom/Office: Boom
    Kitchen: Touch + powered Fostex PM0.4
    Misc use: Radio (with battery)
    iPad1 with iPengHD & SqueezePad
    (spares Touch, SB3, reciever ,controller )
    server HP proliant micro server N36L with ClearOS Linux

    http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveb View Post
    Logitech were, and always would have been, the wrong company to buy Slim Devices. Their core businesses were just miles apart.
    Perhaps, but I think most other companies would have struggled to keep the product line going, and most other companies would have wasted no time pulling the plug on support once they pulled out of the market.

    Another kind of company may have been better suited at operating in a niche market, selling through channels other than the major retail chains or developing a licensing model. But those other companies could just as well have folded during the financial crisis the years after the sale and taken the Squeezebox with them.

    So even if Logitech, to put it bluntly, failed, they did so in a fairly nice way.

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