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lukaslouw
2008-04-25, 05:57
I have a SB3, and am looking at also getting a Duet.

I currently have a D-Link DI524 wireless router, and it has been working great now for a number of years.

However, I have a need for wireless network coverage at the far end of my house, where the Duet will be used, about 100 ft away, and the DI524 is mounted on a lower level, with metal, such as kitchen appliances in between the 2 areas, so I cannot get a decent wireless signal at the far end of the house. I DO have a hardwired RJ45 jack at the far end of the house from the DI524, but it seems that the Duet controller really needs to talk back to the router, but what kind of range can I expect with the Duet controller, using the SB receiver in bridge mode, i.e. hardwired CAT5 to receiver, and it acting as access point for the controller?

So my question is:
Can I connect a 2nd wireless router to he RJ45 jack at the far end of the house to provide wireless coverage there, if the bridge mode has limitations?
What are the pitfalls, even if possible, and could anyone maybe suggest another product that that I could use instead of a 2nd router?

Re-locating the existing DI524 is unfortunately completely impractical, so is not an option.

Thanks, any suggestions will be appreciated,
Lukas

radish
2008-04-25, 06:01
Sure, a second router is no problem and a common solution. However, in this scenario you want it acting as an Access Point, not a Router. To do this, go into the web interface for the router and disable DHCP, and set the channel to one which doesn't conflict with the existing one (e.g. if your current router in on 1, use 11 for the new one). Then connect up the new router but connect to one of the LAN ports, not the WAN - the WAN port should stay empty.

That should be it - just make sure your devices are connecting to the appropriate network. Theoretically you should be able to set them both to use the same SSID and encryption keys to make it transparent but I've never found that reliable so I use different SSIDs so I know where they're connected.

lukaslouw
2008-04-25, 06:11
Thanks for that info - However, if the Duet controller gives me decent range in bridge mode, I may not have to resort to the 2nd router. I wonder if anyone has any experience with tha tyet?

Lukas

ik632
2008-04-25, 11:31
If you do end up getting another router some of them can be configured to act only as an access point. I have a Belkin wireless router that I use only as an access point while my Linksys does all of the routing.

radish
2008-04-25, 12:02
If you do end up getting another router some of them can be configured to act only as an access point. I have a Belkin wireless router that I use only as an access point while my Linksys does all of the routing.

Switching it to some "AP mode" is basically the same as disabling DHCP and the WAN port. What is commonly referred to as a "wireless router" is actually several devices in one - an access point, a switch, a DHCP server, a NAT router and often an SPI firewall. If you switch off the DHCP and bypass the router & firewall (by not using the WAN port) you end up with an AP and a switch :)

Neil66
2008-04-25, 13:46
Thanks for that info - However, if the Duet controller gives me decent range in bridge mode, I may not have to resort to the 2nd router. I wonder if anyone has any experience with tha tyet?

Lukas

Yep, I'm running mine like that as my wireless router is up in the loft & the signal's a litle weak.

I can control the SB from pretty much all over the house (say up to 25-30m and a coupls of walls) - it's starts to drop out in a room at the diagonally opposite side of the house, ie about two or three walls & a ceiling & 30m away - give it a try ;)